iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Doe, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. Doe

    Doe Guest

    Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):650-6. Links

    Impact of iron deficiency anemia on prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Lao TT, Ho LF.

    Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. University of Hong
    Kong, Hong Kong, China.

    OBJECTIVE:-Increased Hb and ferritin have been associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
    This study was performed to determine whether the prevalence of GDM is influenced by iron deficiency
    anemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-In a retrospective case-control study, 242 women with iron
    deficiency anemia (Hb <10 g/dl with features of iron deficiency) were compared with 484 nonanemic
    women matched for year of birth, who were delivered within the same 24-month period in our hospital,
    with respect to maternal demographics, infant outcome, and the prevalence of GDM diagnosed according
    to the World Health Organization criteria. RESULTS:-There was no difference in the prepregnancy
    weight or BMI, but the anemic group had more multiparas and significantly lower gestational weight
    and BMI increments and prevalence of GDM (odds ratio [OR] .52, 95% CI 0.27-0.97), which was
    inversely correlated (P = 0.045) with the duration of anemia. To determine the independent effect of
    anemia on GDM, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for the effects of
    multiparity and BMI, and anemia was confirmed to be significantly associated with decreased
    prevalence of GDM (adjusted OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.90). CONCLUSIONS:-The prevalence of GDM is
    reduced in iron deficiency anemia, which probably served as a surrogate for other factors such as
    nutritional inadequacy and reduced gestational weight gain. Further studies on the relationship
    between nutritional improvement and the increasing prevalence of GDM in the developing world are
    warranted.

    PMID: 14988280 [PubMed - in process]

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
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    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
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  2. Manky Badger

    Manky Badger Guest

    "doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):650-6. Links
    >
    >
    > Impact of iron deficiency anemia on prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    OK Tom - so what's your point?

    You are seriously advocating the deliberate imposition of a serious condition with long term effects
    on ALL pregnant women & their unborn babies to ameliorate a transient manageable condition in a
    vanishingly small percentage of pregnant women ?
     
  3. markd

    markd Guest

    Tom, here is the point to ponder:

    "CONCLUSIONS:-The prevalence of GDM is reduced in iron deficiency anemia, which probably served as a
    surrogate for other factors such as nutritional inadequacy and reduced gestational weight gain.
    Further studies on the relationship between nutritional improvement and the increasing prevalence of
    GDM in the developing world are warranted."

    So, mothers to be who are malnurished and iron anemic have less, not none bty, gdm. I n india, a
    mostly veggie consuming country, there is a serious problem with iron amenia and the world's highest
    rate of diabetes in the general population, not just mothers to be. How are we to understand this?
     
  4. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes
    >From: [email protected]
    >Date: 2/28/2004 6:14 PM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >

    Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):650-6. Links

    Impact of iron deficiency anemia on prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Lao TT, Ho LF.

    Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. University of Hong
    Kong, Hong Kong, China.

    OBJECTIVE:-Increased Hb and ferritin have been associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
    This study was performed to determine whether the prevalence of GDM is influenced by iron deficiency
    anemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-In a retrospective case-control study, 242 women with iron
    deficiency anemia (Hb <10 g/dl with features of iron deficiency) were compared with 484 nonanemic
    women matched for year of birth, who were delivered within the same 24-month period in our hospital,
    with respect to maternal demographics, infant outcome, and the prevalence of GDM diagnosed according
    to the World Health Organization criteria. RESULTS:-There was no difference in the prepregnancy
    weight or BMI, but the anemic group had more multiparas and significantly lower gestational weight
    and BMI increments and prevalence of GDM (odds ratio [OR] .52, 95% CI 0.27-0.97), which was
    inversely correlated (P = 0.045) with the duration of anemia. To determine the independent effect of
    anemia on GDM, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for the effects of
    multiparity and BMI, and anemia was confirmed to be significantly associated with decreased
    prevalence of GDM (adjusted OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.90). CONCLUSIONS:-The prevalence of GDM is
    reduced in iron deficiency anemia, which probably served as a surrogate for other factors such as
    nutritional inadequacy and reduced gestational weight gain. Further studies on the relationship
    between nutritional improvement and the increasing prevalence of GDM in the developing world are
    warranted.

    PMID: 14988280 [PubMed - in process]

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ------

    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  5. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes
    >From: "Manky Badger" [email protected]
    >Date: 2/28/2004 4:44 PM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>

    Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):650-6. Links

    Impact of iron deficiency anemia on prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Lao TT, Ho LF.

    Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. University of Hong
    Kong, Hong Kong, China.

    OBJECTIVE:-Increased Hb and ferritin have been associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
    This study was performed to determine whether the prevalence of GDM is influenced by iron deficiency
    anemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-In a retrospective case-control study, 242 women with iron
    deficiency anemia (Hb <10 g/dl with features of iron deficiency) were compared with 484 nonanemic
    women matched for year of birth, who were delivered within the same 24-month period in our hospital,
    with respect to maternal demographics, infant outcome, and the prevalence of GDM diagnosed according
    to the World Health Organization criteria. RESULTS:-There was no difference in the prepregnancy
    weight or BMI, but the anemic group had more multiparas and significantly lower gestational weight
    and BMI increments and prevalence of GDM (odds ratio [OR] .52, 95% CI 0.27-0.97), which was
    inversely correlated (P = 0.045) with the duration of anemia. To determine the independent effect of
    anemia on GDM, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for the effects of
    multiparity and BMI, and anemia was confirmed to be significantly associated with decreased
    prevalence of GDM (adjusted OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.90). CONCLUSIONS:-The prevalence of GDM is
    reduced in iron deficiency anemia, which probably served as a surrogate for other factors such as
    nutritional inadequacy and reduced gestational weight gain. Further studies on the relationship
    between nutritional improvement and the increasing prevalence of GDM in the developing world are
    warranted.

    PMID: 14988280 [PubMed - in process]

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ------

    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  6. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes

    >You are seriously advocating the deliberate imposition of a serious

    Serious .. ? Get .. serious .. Learn your shit ..

    >condition with long term effects on ALL pregnant women & their unborn babies to ameliorate a
    >transient manageable condition in a vanishingly small percentage of pregnant women ?

    Haematologia (Budap) 1993;25(2):69-84

    Adequate iron stores and the 'Nil nocere' principle.

    Hollan S, Johansen KS National Institute of Haematology, Blood Transfusion and Immunology, Budapest.

    There is a need to change the policy of unselective iron supplementation during periods of life with
    physiologically increased cell proliferation.

    Levels of iron stores to be regarded as adequate during infancy and pregnancy are still not well
    established.

    Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations
    developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron
    absorption, utilization and storage.

    Recent data suggest that the chelatable intracellular iron pool regulates the expression of proteins
    with central importance in cellular iron metabolism (TfR, ferritin, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic
    synthetase) in a coordinately controlled way through an iron dependent cytosolic mRNA binding
    protein, the iron regulating factor (IRF).

    This factor is simultaneously a sensor and a regulator of iron levels.

    The reduction of ferritin levels during highly increased cell proliferation is a mirror of the
    increased density of TfRs.

    An abundance of data support the vigorous competition for growth-essential iron between microbial
    pathogens and their vertebrate hosts.

    The highly coordinated regulation of iron metabolism is probably crucial in achieving a balance
    between the blockade of readily accessible iron to invading organisms and yet providing sufficient
    iron for the immune system of the host.

    The most evident adverse clinical effects of excess iron have been observed in immunodeficient
    patients in tropical countries and in AIDS patients.

    Excess iron also increases the risk of initiation and promotion of malignant processes by iron
    binding to DNA and by the iron-catalysed release of free radicals.

    Oxygen radicals were shown to damage critical biomolecules leading, apart from cancer, to a variety
    of human disease states, including inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    They are also involved in processes of aging and thrombosis.

    Recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of iron-chelators, natural and synthetic
    antioxidants, and anti-TfR monoclonal antibodies can contribute in retarding malignant cell
    proliferation.

    Hypoferraemia during pregnancy is--like haemodilution--an adaptation to the risks involved in the
    natural hypercoagulable state of pregnancy.

    It may also serve to prevent the risk of infections and mutagenicity in the highly proliferating
    tissues of the foetus.

    Blunted erythropoiesis has been revealed during the first 30 weeks of pregnancy by the use of the
    newly developed method of determining the soluble serum transferrin receptor.

    The lack of increase in erythropoietin levels proves that there is no hypoxia.

    Decreases in Hb and iron levels are parts of a physiological adaptation.

    As a consequence they should neither be treated nor prevented.

    It is stressed that whenever a widespread and ingrained routine medical intervention has to be
    changed it is essential to first monitor the potential health effects of the recommended change in a
    national policy.

    Publication Types:

    Review Review, tutorial PMID: 8244202, UI: 94063698

    Who loves ya. Tom

    Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  7. markd

    markd Guest

    > Re: iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes
    >
    > From: [email protected] (doe) Reply to: doe Date: 29 Feb 2004 04:10:48 GMT Organization:
    > AOL Canada http://www.aol.ca Newsgroups: sci.med.nutrition
    Tom, here is the central point to considr:

    "Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations
    developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron
    absorption, utilization and storage."> Followup to: newsgroup > References: >
    <[email protected]> >>Subject: Re: iron deficiency anemia
    = no diabetes > >>You are seriously advocating the deliberate imposition
    of a serious > > >Serious .. ? >Get .. serious .. >Learn your shit .. >
    >>condition with long term effects on ALL pregnant women & their unborn
    babies >>to ameliorate a transient manageable condition in a vanishingly small >>percentage of
    pregnant women ? > >Haematologia (Budap) 1993;25(2):69-84 > > >Adequate iron stores and the 'Nil
    nocere' principle.
    > >Hollan S, Johansen KS >National Institute of Haematology, Blood
    Transfusion and Immunology, Budapest. > >There is a need to change the policy of unselective iron
    supplementation during >periods of life with physiologically increased cell proliferation. > >Levels
    of iron stores to be regarded as adequate during infancy and pregnancy >are still not well
    established. > >Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with
    >physiological adaptations developed through millions of years by sophisticated >and precisely
    coordinated regulation of iron absorption, utilization and >storage. > >Recent data suggest that the
    chelatable intracellular iron pool regulates the >expression of proteins with central importance in
    cellular iron metabolism >(TfR, ferritin, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic synthetase) in a
    coordinately >controlled way through an iron dependent cytosolic mRNA binding protein, the >iron
    regulating factor (IRF). > >This factor is simultaneously a sensor and a regulator of iron levels. >
    >The reduction of ferritin levels during highly increased cell proliferation is >a mirror of the
    increased density of TfRs. > >An abundance of data support the vigorous competition for growth-
    essential iron >between microbial pathogens and their vertebrate hosts. > >The highly coordinated
    regulation of iron metabolism is probably crucial in >achieving a balance between the blockade of
    readily accessible iron to invading >organisms and yet providing sufficient iron for the immune
    system of the host. > >The most evident adverse clinical effects of excess iron have been observed
    in >immunodeficient patients in tropical countries and in AIDS patients. > >Excess iron also
    increases the risk of initiation and promotion of malignant >processes by iron binding to DNA and by
    the iron-catalysed release of free >radicals. > >Oxygen radicals were shown to damage critical
    biomolecules leading, apart from >cancer, to a variety of human disease states, including
    inflammation and
    >atherosclerosis. > >They are also involved in processes of aging and
    thrombosis. > >Recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of iron-chelators, natural >and
    synthetic antioxidants, and anti-TfR monoclonal antibodies can contribute >in retarding malignant
    cell proliferation. > >Hypoferraemia during pregnancy is--like haemodilution--an adaptation to the
    >risks involved in the natural hypercoagulable state of pregnancy. > >It may also serve to prevent
    the risk of infections and mutagenicity in the >highly proliferating tissues of the foetus. >
    >Blunted erythropoiesis has been revealed during the first 30 weeks of pregnancy >by the use of the
    newly developed method of determining the soluble serum >transferrin receptor. > >The lack of
    increase in erythropoietin levels proves that there is no hypoxia. >
    >Decreases in Hb and iron levels are parts of a physiological adaptation.
    > >As a consequence they should neither be treated nor prevented. > >It is
    stressed that whenever a widespread and ingrained routine medical
    >intervention has to be changed it is essential to first monitor the
    potential >health effects of the recommended change in a national policy.
    > >Publication Types: > > >Review >Review, tutorial >PMID: 8244202, UI:
    94063698 > >Who loves ya. >Tom > > >Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com >Man
    Is A Herbivore! http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore >DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking Tom, here again is the central point to
    consider in the post you made:

    "Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations
    developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron
    absorption, utilization and storage."

    This would no doubt include the methods you advocate to interfere with iron storage etc., not to
    mention that if you read the info carefully it again is an example which severly undermines the
    points of your thesis. You cann't have it both ways.
     
  8. Doe

    Doe Guest

  9. markd

    markd Guest

    Tom, here is the core of the article:

    "Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations
    developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron
    absorption, utilization and storage."

    This alone, again as in other posts you made, undercut yyour thesis fatally. One must assume the
    methods you advocate to interfere in iron stores etc. are covered by the above. If one reads the
    entire article, it adds to the messages you present that contridict major parts of your thesis.
    Humans have been eating meat for millions of years and have adjusted to the iron levels therein,
    that's what this says, you posted it.
     
  10. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: iron deficiency anemia = no diabetes
    >From: [email protected]
    >Date: 2/29/2004 6:26 PM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <4042915a$0$2[email protected]>
    >

    What part of .. you are full of crap .. don't you understand ..?

    Do you think I actually read the crap you post .. ?

    Hit it ..

    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
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