Is a 45 sec rest too small?



B

Bradley Burton

Guest
My workout is three sets of each exercise with a 45 second rest in between.
This is what a book by the Men's Health magazine recommends for a body
shaping workout. The workout is about three exercises for each muscle
group. It's a very long workout, and I'm not noticing results yet (not even
the 'immediate' results you get right away), and I'm not sore the next day
after the workout.

Is it going to hinder me from gaining much muscle taking only a 45 sec rest
compared to if I took a minute or two? If it will then I can't imagine why
they would say to do that in the book.

Thanks. I just want to maximize my workout, and not spend a lot of my time
lifting weights in a way that will only give me mediocre results.

Brad
 
On Sat, 2 Jul 2005 19:07:38 -0500, "Bradley Burton"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>My workout is three sets of each exercise with a 45 second rest in between.
>This is what a book by the Men's Health magazine recommends for a body
>shaping workout. The workout is about three exercises for each muscle
>group. It's a very long workout, and I'm not noticing results yet (not even
>the 'immediate' results you get right away), and I'm not sore the next day
>after the workout.
>
>Is it going to hinder me from gaining much muscle taking only a 45 sec rest
>compared to if I took a minute or two? If it will then I can't imagine why
>they would say to do that in the book.
>
>Thanks. I just want to maximize my workout, and not spend a lot of my time
>lifting weights in a way that will only give me mediocre results.


What are your goals? Be specific. How old are you?? Height, weight,
body fat percentage if known? What results are you expecting after
working out for how long?? It could be that your expectations are
unrealistic.

There is no magic number of how many seconds/minutes of rest between
sets. I use a heart rate monitor and begin my next set after my heart
rate drops a certain number of beats or percentage of max. I generally
rest between 1-2 minutes unless I am going heavy or doing legs when I
will rest longer.

Soreness the day after your workout is not an indicator of how
productive your workout is. Many people don't experience it and when
they do it often goes away after you have been training for a while.

RC
 
J

Jeff Finlayson

Guest
Bradley Burton wrote:

> My workout is three sets of each exercise with a 45 second rest in between.
> This is what a book by the Men's Health magazine recommends for a body
> shaping workout.


There's one problem; using buzz phrases like body shaping.

> The workout is about three exercises for each muscle
> group. It's a very long workout, and I'm not noticing results yet (not even
> the 'immediate' results you get right away), and I'm not sore the next day
> after the workout.


Soreness is a poor indicator of workout quality. Go by progress in
weights, reps, measurements and such.

> Is it going to hinder me from gaining much muscle taking only a 45 sec rest
> compared to if I took a minute or two?


For what you are doing yes. Try 1-2 minutes.
 
A

ATP*

Guest
"Bradley Burton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My workout is three sets of each exercise with a 45 second rest in
> between. This is what a book by the Men's Health magazine recommends for a
> body shaping workout. The workout is about three exercises for each
> muscle group. It's a very long workout, and I'm not noticing results yet
> (not even the 'immediate' results you get right away), and I'm not sore
> the next day after the workout.
>
> Is it going to hinder me from gaining much muscle taking only a 45 sec
> rest compared to if I took a minute or two? If it will then I can't
> imagine why they would say to do that in the book.
>
> Thanks. I just want to maximize my workout, and not spend a lot of my
> time lifting weights in a way that will only give me mediocre results.
>
> Brad


From the editor of the Crossfit Journal:

"This was the motivation for

creating the CrossFit Journal. The

fitness rags-featuring grotesque

bodybuilders and their irrelevant

routines, a homoerotic flavor (with

guys all too often working out in their

underwear), fake science promoting

supplements and regimens by snow

job, and cookie-cutter content foreign

to athletes and athletics-are entirely

ignored by folks serious about fitness

and performance."


www.crossfit.com
 
A

A K

Guest
I might bump it up to exactly 60 seconds. The reason that they tell you a
short rest is because the short rest really stimulates the testosterone and
growth hormones within you and gives you that pump. Bodybuilders tend to
use shorter rest inbetween sets for that reason.

--
A K
www.fitnessplanning.com


"Bradley Burton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My workout is three sets of each exercise with a 45 second rest in

between.
> This is what a book by the Men's Health magazine recommends for a body
> shaping workout. The workout is about three exercises for each muscle
> group. It's a very long workout, and I'm not noticing results yet (not

even
> the 'immediate' results you get right away), and I'm not sore the next day
> after the workout.
>
> Is it going to hinder me from gaining much muscle taking only a 45 sec

rest
> compared to if I took a minute or two? If it will then I can't imagine

why
> they would say to do that in the book.
>
> Thanks. I just want to maximize my workout, and not spend a lot of my

time
> lifting weights in a way that will only give me mediocre results.
>
> Brad
>
>
 
J

JMW

Guest
"A K" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I might bump it up to exactly 60 seconds. The reason that they tell you a
>short rest is because the short rest really stimulates the testosterone and
>growth hormones within you and gives you that pump.


The hormonal increases are very transient. So it the "pump," i.e.,
blood engorgement.
 
>From the editor of the Crossfit Journal:

"This was the motivation for


creating the CrossFit Journal. The


fitness rags-featuring grotesque


bodybuilders and their irrelevant


routines, a homoerotic flavor (with


guys all too often working out in their


underwear), fake science promoting


supplements and regimens by snow


job, and cookie-cutter content foreign


to athletes and athletics-are entirely


ignored by folks serious about fitness


and performance.">

Wow! There really is ONE normal guy lifting weights.