Is a month long enough to work up to 50?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Mike Rice, Sep 9, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time
    to participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy
    before the HH.

    The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    (hands, shoulders).

    I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far I
    get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?

    Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.

    I've got a feeling this is do-able.

    Any advice?

    Mike Rice
     
    Tags:


  2. bikeman

    bikeman Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 22:06:59 GMT, Mike Rice <[email protected]> wrote:

    >With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time
    >to participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy
    >before the HH.
    >
    >The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    >normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    >(hands, shoulders).
    >
    >I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far
    >I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >
    >Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >
    >I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >
    >Any advice?
    >
    >Mike Rice
    How are your legs when you do 15-20 miles on your wedgie? If they are pretty fresh, you should be
    fine. If 15 miles is tough, then it will be tough to get to 50. I was able to do 20 miles on my
    wedgie with fair legs, but everything else hurt for days (I'm fat). I got an EZ-Sport, did 10 miles
    with no pain to adjust everything, and then did 30 miles the next day. Quads and calves were very
    tired, but I had no pain anywhere. I expect to do 40 miles this Friday (one week after the 30 miler)
    and then 50 miles in another 2 weeks. Two weeks after that, I expect to finish a metric century
    (slowly). Although I cannot ride the bike outside most evenings, I can use a recumbent exercise bike
    with almost identical geometry to build leg strength. Don't just ride on weekends - that will be a
    recipe for disaster. Listen to your body, and stop if you feel joint pain, especially in the knees.
    Good luck! Dan
     
  3. bikeman

    bikeman Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 23:01:36 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >>Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >>
    >>I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >>
    >>Any advice?
    >>
    >>Mike Rice
    Sorry, forgot to add transportation. The easiest way is to use a folding rack that goes on the back
    of your vehicle. I got a Performance Transport, but any of the similar type work well (like a Rhode
    Gear, etc.). Then just put the bike on centered across the two support arms. The wheels stick out on
    each side of my small car, but that is not an issue. If you want to put it on top, you will need a
    tandem mount, which could cause clearance problems, and that huge seat will be up in the wind (read
    - stress!). On the back of the car, part of the seat is behind the car, and the seatback is slicing
    into the wind, not full across like a sail. Dan
     
  4. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    Mike Rice <[email protected]> wrote in news:eek:[email protected]:

    > With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time
    > to participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy
    > before the HH.
    >
    > The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    > normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    > (hands, shoulders).
    >
    > I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far
    > I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >
    > Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >
    > I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >
    > Any advice?
    >
    > Mike Rice

    MAYBE. For a FLAT 50, no problem. But Bloomingtion area is another matter! I would want to be
    comfortable doing at least 25 with similar hills to expect to do the 50 with those hills on the big
    day. Good luck! Go for it!!!
     
  5. Hauling

    Hauling Guest

    Maybe. I have ridden about 433 miles over the last 6 weeks, and I am still only up to about 28 miles
    max per ride.

    I rode 1500 miles this year... up to the time I purchased the recumbent... including a single 480
    mile week in June that included a century midweek. A recumbent is a whole different activity, and
    it may take your particular body significantly more time to adjust than you might think. Many
    people say you get recumbent legs in 400 miles, some say 1000 miles, and others say 2 years. I am
    strong for rides up to about 20 miles, and then start to weaken. On my litespeed I could ride more
    like 65 miles before starting to weaken. In late July, I thought I would buy a bike and be ready
    for a century by Sept 1, but I didnt make it. It looks like it is going to take another 4 or 5
    weeks still.

    Mike Rice wrote:

    > With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time
    > to participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy
    > before the HH.
    >
    > The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    > normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    > (hands, shoulders).
    >
    > I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far
    > I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >
    > Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >
    > I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >
    > Any advice?
    >
    > Mike Rice
     
  6. Dave Harney

    Dave Harney Guest

    I think it depends a lot on your age plus a few more health factors. If you are less than 30 years
    old and don't have any joint problems then you can probably increase your distance in 5 mile
    increments every 3 or 4 days and make 50 or so by the end of 30 days in grand style. You should
    concentrate on getting plenty of sleep and eating a muscle building diet. If you are over 50 and
    have joint problems, I suspect you need more time or learn to enjoy pain.

    "Mike Rice" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time
    > to participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy
    > before the HH.
    >
    > The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    > normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    > (hands, shoulders).
    >
    > I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far
    > I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >
    > Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >
    > I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >
    > Any advice?
    >
    > Mike Rice
     
  7. La

    La Guest

    Mike Rice wrote:

    > Any advice?
    >
    > Mike Rice

    Mike, It's very doable! The key is to spend time spinning. Keep the RPM between 80 and 100. I really
    think that spinning is more important than logging miles. Spin first until you feel really
    comfortable attacking a hill like a bent head, then increase your miles. If you can do 30-35 miles
    before the 50 mile ride, you should have not problem. Spin till it seems natural.

    Lon HepCat
     
  8. Dr. Duk

    Dr. Duk New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike:

    I purchased my TE approximately three (3) weeks ago. What a wonderful RECUMBENT!!! I am just short of 400 miles. My other ride is a Vision R64 SABRE which has a high BB. The first two weeks was quite an adjustment period of acquiring new muscles but I believe this has been accomplished. The TE is such an accomodating vehicle. My advice is ride everyday and ride has many miles has you can.
    On the transportation issue I have a Sportworks carrier that I put on my Yukon XL. I have the hoops extended out the limit of width. On the hoop which supports the rear tire I cut the outer end out and did some additions with some 1 1/2 angle iron for a bottom brace. The rear wheel extends out from the side of the vehicle about 12" but it offers no problem for clearance. A pair of toe straps around the tires and hoops and the use of the spring arm on the front tire makes the transportation problem history. Of course I had the carrier prior for transporting my other recumbent bikes so I didn't have too purchase one just for the purpose of carring the TE.
    Hopefully this will help answer your questions. Safe Riding and Good Luck. DR. Duk
     
  9. Dr. Duk

    Dr. Duk New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike:

    One more point of inspiration. I am 56 yrs of age with one artifical knee and another one due later this fall. I average between 75 and 100 miles per week. I have a hundred miler coming up this weekend ( not a Metric) that I plan on doing with my other half. This will be accomplished (I HOPE) on a RANS SCREAMER so stay focused and you will make your destination in style.

    Dr. Duk
     
  10. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 20:29:12 -0500, MLB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >MAYBE. For a FLAT 50, no problem. But Bloomingtion area is another matter! I would want to be
    >comfortable doing at least 25 with similar hills to expect to do the 50 with those hills on the big
    >day. Good luck! Go for it!!!

    Good point! I'm confident a flat fifty would be do-able in this time frame. I'm two hours north of
    Bloomington, we do have several decent hills I can practice on.

    Mike
     
  11. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 22:07:30 -0400, hauling <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Maybe. I have ridden about 433 miles over the last 6 weeks, and I am still only up to about 28
    >miles max per ride.
    >
    >I rode 1500 miles this year... up to the time I purchased the recumbent... including a single 480
    >mile week in June that included a century midweek. A recumbent is a whole different activity, and
    >it may take your particular body significantly more time to adjust than you might think. Many
    >people say you get recumbent legs in 400 miles, some say 1000 miles, and others say 2 years. I am
    >strong for rides up to about 20 miles, and then start to weaken. On my litespeed I could ride more
    >like 65 miles before starting to weaken. In late July, I thought I would buy a bike and be ready
    >for a century by Sept 1, but I didnt make it. It looks like it is going to take another 4 or 5
    >weeks still.

    Well I may not get to that distance this year...we'll see. If I don't get very comfortable with 30
    and 35 mile rides I won't even think about trying for a fifty.

    Mike
    >
    >Mike Rice wrote:
    >
    >> With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time to
    >> participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy before
    >> the HH.
    >>
    >> The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    >> normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    >> (hands, shoulders).
    >>
    >> I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how
    >> far I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >>
    >> Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >>
    >> I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >>
    >> Any advice?
    >>
    >> Mike Rice
     
  12. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 23:01:36 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >How are your legs when you do 15-20 miles on your wedgie? If they are pretty fresh, you should be
    >fine. If 15 miles is tough, then it will be tough to get to 50. I was able to do 20 miles on my
    >wedgie with fair legs, but everything else hurt for days (I'm fat).

    My legs aren't bad after 20 (I've probably had a little break two thirds of the way through) My
    longest wedgie ride was 42 miles, an hour and a half with a tail wind and three and a half hours to
    get home. I was so sore I called off work that night. Always my shoulders are the sore spot. I feel
    a twenty mile ride for an hour or two after I get home.

    > I got an EZ-Sport, did 10 miles with no pain to adjust everything, and then did 30 miles the next
    > day. Quads and calves were very tired, but I had no pain anywhere. I expect to do 40 miles this
    > Friday (one week after the 30 miler) and then 50 miles in another 2 weeks. Two weeks after that, I
    > expect to finish a metric century (slowly).

    Very encouraging. I hope to have similar results. It was an EZ-Sport on ebay that made me think that
    *maybe* I could afford a recumbent. Plus the curvy lines reminded me of the old shwinn frames. But
    when I did my test rides I realized that the bike I would love to live with was the Tour Easy.

    >Although I cannot ride the bike outside most evenings, I can use a recumbent exercise bike with
    >almost identical geometry to build leg strength.

    I'm riding every other day.

    >Don't just ride on weekends - that will be a recipe for disaster. Listen to your body, and stop if
    >you feel joint pain, especially in the knees. Good luck! Dan

    [email protected] also wrote:

    >Sorry, forgot to add transportation. The easiest way is to use a folding rack that goes on the back
    >of your vehicle. I got a Performance Transport, but any of the similar type work well (like a Rhode
    >Gear, etc.). Then just put the bike on centered across the two support arms. The wheels stick out
    >on each side of my small car, but that is not an issue. If you want to put it on top, you will need
    >a tandem mount, which could cause clearance problems, and that huge seat will be up in the wind
    >(read - stress!). On the back of the car, part of the seat is behind the car, and the seatback is
    >slicing into the wind, not full across like a sail. Dan

    I think I've got a Rhode Gear folding rack in the storage shed. Saw it for sale on a bulleting board
    shortly after picking up my old DF five years ago. I'll probably put the seat in my trunk if I haul
    the TE. Or figure a tarp for it if left on the bike.

    Mike
     
  13. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 02:34:36 GMT, "Dave Harney" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think it depends a lot on your age plus a few more health factors. If you are less than 30 years
    >old and don't have any joint problems then you can probably increase your distance in 5 mile
    >increments every 3 or 4 days and make 50 or so by the end of 30 days in grand style. You should
    >concentrate on getting plenty of sleep and eating a muscle building diet. If you are over 50 and
    >have joint problems, I suspect you need more time or learn to enjoy pain.

    I'm closing on 52, no joint problems. If I enjoyed pain I wouldn't be getting the Tour Easy ;-).

    I'll surprise myself if I make it this year. If I don't I'll be even more surprised if I miss
    *next* year.

    Mike
    >
    >"Mike Rice" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> With the Hilly Hundred coming up, I find myself wondering if I can get into condition in time to
    >> participate. I should have 30 days or so to get to know my soon-to-be-delivered Tour Easy before
    >> the HH.
    >>
    >> The TE will use different muscles than my current bike, a 30 or so year old Schwinn Varsity. My
    >> normal ride now is 5 to 10 miles and if I up that to 15 or twenty the bike starts to beat me up
    >> (hands, shoulders).
    >>
    >> I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how
    >> far I get in the first two or three weeks. Anybody know how late one can register?
    >>
    >> Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well.
    >>
    >> I've got a feeling this is do-able.
    >>
    >> Any advice?
    >>
    >> Mike Rice
     
  14. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 03:01:06 GMT, LA <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Mike Rice wrote:
    >
    >> Any advice?
    >>
    >> Mike Rice
    >
    >Mike, It's very doable! The key is to spend time spinning. Keep the RPM between 80 and 100. I
    >really think that spinning is more important than logging miles. Spin first until you feel really
    >comfortable attacking a hill like a bent head, then increase your miles. If you can do 30-35 miles
    >before the 50 mile ride, you should have not problem. Spin till it seems natural.
    >
    >Lon HepCat

    When I have let a year (or longer) go by without riding my DF those first hills are a royal pain. If
    I hit the same hills a couple of times a day for a week or two they become fun.

    Thanks for the tip, this will be different for me. My current riding style is more relaxed cruising
    with maybe one quarter of my riding dedicated to trying to build some speed.

    Mike
     
  15. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    >>weeks still.
    >
    > Well I may not get to that distance this year...we'll see. If I don't get very comfortable with 30
    > and 35 mile rides I won't even think about trying for a fifty.

    I've seen it said many times that you can 'easily' do twice the mileage you've been training at for
    a single day ride. (assuming you're riding enough to be in decent biking shape) and I've found that
    to be true in my limited long group rides. There is a 'group energy' in an event that will sustain
    you to some degree more than laboring by yourself. For me, it's a large degree. Also the energizing
    stops for snacks and standing up are significant factors. I'd not ridden more than 25 miles at a
    time when I did a group 44, with ease. Felt great at the end and could have done it again. Hadn't
    done more than 30 when I rode a metric century (62 miles?) again with no problem. BUT, those were
    flat, hills can KILL :) If you can do 25 with some hills and feel strong, I'd do it :) Worse case,
    nobody cares (or makes sport of you) if you don't make it. (besides you)
     
  16. "Mike Rice" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > I know the only thing to do is get out there and work on the miles, and the hills, and see how far
    > I get in the first two or three weeks.

    You're right on the spot here

    > Anybody know how late one can register?

    Just register, then you'll be motivated.

    > I've got a feeling this is do-able.

    This just supports the above mentioned advice.

    Good luck - and remember that the training won't hurt you.

    Torben
     
  17. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 19:34:22 -0500, Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you accept ahead of time that you will be really slow on the uphill sections, and that you will
    >suffer from considerable lactic acid buildup in the leg muscles (and the resulting discomfort)
    >while climbing, it is possible to do a reasonably long (e.g. metric century) with almost no
    >conditioning.
    >

    I've noticed that last night's 13 miles were more comfortable than 10 a week ago. I'm shooting for
    10 or more every other day, with a longer ride on the weekend for now. The TE should ship tomorrow,
    I'm thinking that means shipping to People Mover's,where the box(es) will be opened & assorted
    goodies added before being re-shipped to me. That should give me my month to see how I take to it.

    I'm not familiar with the lactic acid buildup, but I plan on riding a lot of hills the two weeks
    just before the ride...just after my two week breaking in period. I expect to be very slow climbing,
    but you have to climb if you want to ride down, eh?

    Mike Rice
     
  18. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Mike Rice wrote:
    > ... Have to work out a method to transport the TE as well....

    A medium frame TE will fit into a fifth generation (1992-1995) Honda Civic hatchback and an XL TiGRR
    (with a Super Zzipper) will fit into a late model Honda Accord [1] wagon if the wheels are removed.
    Almost any small station wagon sold in the US should work to transport an Easy Racer.

    [1] This is with the front seats occupied by taller than average people.

    Tom Sherman - Near the confluence of the Mississippi and Rock Rivers
     
  19. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Dave Harney wrote:
    >
    > I think it depends a lot on your age plus a few more health factors. If you are less than 30 years
    > old and don't have any joint problems then you can probably increase your distance in 5 mile
    > increments every 3 or 4 days and make 50 or so by the end of 30 days in grand style. You should
    > concentrate on getting plenty of sleep and eating a muscle building diet. If you are over 50 and
    > have joint problems, I suspect you need more time or learn to enjoy pain.

    If you accept ahead of time that you will be really slow on the uphill sections, and that you will
    suffer from considerable lactic acid buildup in the leg muscles (and the resulting discomfort) while
    climbing, it is possible to do a reasonably long (e.g. metric century) with almost no conditioning.

    Been there, done that (within the last two weeks, no less).

    Tom Sherman - Near the confluence of the Mississippi and Rock Rivers
     
  20. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    > I'm not familiar with the lactic acid buildup, but I plan on riding a

    It's that wonderful, life affirming BURN in your legs you feel when pushing hard. It hurts so good!
    (as we used to say when lifting weights)
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...