Is adding a seat post with shock absorber worth the effort?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Yankee_fan, Sep 16, 2003.

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  1. Yankee_fan

    Yankee_fan Guest

    I have a GT "hybrid" from the early 90's - rigid frame, no shocks anywhere. Just serviced at LBS and
    in good working condition. I ride about 50% road, 30% rail trail, 20% single track totalling about
    100 miles a week. I'm considering changing out the seat & post to add some shock aborption.
    Questions:
    1. Is it worth the effort?
    2. How much seat travel should I look for (I've seen 3/4" to 2" in the posts I've checked
    out so far).
    3. Stem diameter is 26.4mm - better to get an exact replacement, or OK to use a shim kit
    for sizing.

    Reply to group preferred. Thanks for any advice or opinions!
     
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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 13:48:08 GMT, "Yankee_Fan" <[email protected]> may have said:

    >I have a GT "hybrid" from the early 90's - rigid frame, no shocks anywhere. Just serviced at LBS
    >and in good working condition. I ride about 50% road, 30% rail trail, 20% single track totalling
    >about 100 miles a week. I'm considering changing out the seat & post to add some shock aborption.
    >Questions:
    >1. Is it worth the effort?

    I like mine; it's very little effort to change, the main thing is the cost.

    >2. How much seat travel should I look for (I've seen 3/4" to 2" in the posts I've checked out so
    > far).

    Mine has just over an inch. It was cheap. (REALLY cheap.) I'd like more travel, but what I've
    got helps.

    >3. Stem diameter is 26.4mm - better to get an exact replacement, or OK to use a shim kit for
    > sizing.

    From recent experience, you'll have fun trying to find a prefab shim to that size for any post that
    you're likely to be able to get. Try to buy an exact fit. If not, then shoot for one that you can
    get with an appropriate shim. If all else fails, sometimes coke can shims work.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  3. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    I have one on my road and MTB. For the MTB, it reduces that being-launched-off-the-saddle feeling
    you can get when you go over a bumpy section, so more comfort and more control. For the road, it's
    more subtle, as I have a "road" suspension post with an elastomer only (probably 1 cm of travel). I
    don't notice it at all, but probably would if I were to replace it with a rigid post. And even if it
    lessens the impact of a road bump on my spine only slightly, how many times per season does that
    occur - a few dozen thousand maybe?

    So I think its worth it, especially if you have back issues.

    Kyle

    "Yankee_Fan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a GT "hybrid" from the early 90's - rigid frame, no shocks
    anywhere.
    > Just serviced at LBS and in good working condition. I ride about 50%
    road,
    > 30% rail trail, 20% single track totalling about 100 miles a week. I'm considering changing out
    > the seat & post to add some shock aborption. Questions:
    > 1. Is it worth the effort?
    > 2. How much seat travel should I look for (I've seen 3/4" to 2" in the posts I've checked out so
    > far).
    > 3. Stem diameter is 26.4mm - better to get an exact replacement, or OK to use a shim kit for
    > sizing.
    >
    > Reply to group preferred. Thanks for any advice or opinions!
     
  4. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Yankee_Fan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a GT "hybrid" from the early 90's - rigid frame, no shocks anywhere. Just serviced at LBS
    > and in good working condition. I ride about 50% road, 30% rail trail, 20% single track totalling
    > about 100 miles a week. I'm considering changing out the seat & post to add some shock aborption.
    > Questions:
    > 1. Is it worth the effort?
    > 2. How much seat travel should I look for (I've seen 3/4" to 2" in the posts I've checked out so
    > far).
    > 3. Stem diameter is 26.4mm - better to get an exact replacement, or OK to use a shim kit for
    > sizing.

    They work, but so do fatter tires and/or sprung saddles. Cheap s. posts don't have much travel and
    often develop stiction and/or slop. The better ones are much more effective, but are expensive and
    (most) require a substantial distance from clamp to clamp. Many of them come with shims.
     
  5. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 13:48:08 GMT, Yankee_Fan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > considering changing out the seat & post to add some shock aborption. Questions:
    > 1. Is it worth the effort?

    That's a personal question that can only be answered with experience. It was worth it on my MTB.

    > 2. How much seat travel should I look for (I've seen 3/4" to 2" in the posts I've checked out so
    > far).

    Travel is not as important as quality and adjustability.

    Consider a collapsing-paralellogram (Thudbuster or Tricky
    Dick) instead of a telescoping post; they seem to work better and last longer.

    > 3. Stem diameter is 26.4mm - better to get an exact replacement, or OK to use a shim kit for
    > sizing.

    I can't see any problem with using a shim.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  6. If all you do is ride pavement or crush and run (gravel roads) then a decent sprung saddle (like the
    Brooks Champion Flyer) will suffice.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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