Is basting necessary?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ada Ma, Dec 25, 2003.

  1. Ada Ma

    Ada Ma Guest

    Hi to everybody on RFC,

    I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?
    Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    for all meat?

    Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?

    Many many thanks to all.

    Ada
     
    Tags:


  2. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    Ada Ma wrote:
    > I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting.

    Basting is fairly useless. You get zero penetration. You are better off brining.

    > Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    > for all meat?

    Yes. I hear it lets the juices settle or something. I don't know why, but I know it's a good idea.

    --
    John Gaughan
    http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  3. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    John Gaughan writes:

    >Ada Ma wrote:
    >> I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting.
    >
    >Basting is fairly useless.

    You're useless, especially your brain... what a stupid thing to say.

    >You get zero penetration.

    Bend over, I'll show you penetration. Basting is not intended to add anything internally (unless
    yoose wanna talk gynecologically), basting's sole purpose is to enhance the *exteriour* of the food
    being cooked, especially its texture and appearance, not to mention the flavor.... basting a brace
    of fowl imparts a glistening succulent crispness to the skin, and flavor, depending on the
    composition of the basting medium... much more appetizing than the dried out, dull, parchment-like
    quality of your old lady's appearance. Geeze but you are a kitchen imbecile of the first order... I
    wouldn't trust you to peel spuds.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 25 Dec 2003 15:30:31 -0800, [email protected] (Ada Ma) wrote:

    >Hi to everybody on RFC,
    >
    >I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    >definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?
    >Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    >for all meat?

    Basting is only to brown the skin.

    >Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    >never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?

    When you rotate a bird, there isn't much chance for the juice to settle and seep out of the bird,
    keeping much of the moisture inside.

    What does render out of the bird will baste another bird underneath it.

    -sw
     
  5. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 25 Dec 2003 15:30:31 -0800, [email protected] (Ada Ma) wrote:

    >I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    >definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?

    Basting adds some flavor and prevents meat from drying out. Mostly used for roasted birds.

    >Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    >for all meat?

    It's said to have something to do with allowing the juices to consolidate back into the meat. TV and
    cookbook demos show this to be true -- that is, a roast or bird that's cut into without a rest will
    spill a lot of juice around, while one that has been left to sit for a time has juice in the meat,
    not on the plate. Many roasts will also continue to cook after being removed from the oven, so the
    resting is process of finishing up the cooking. This is recommended for both meat and poultry. There
    was a recent discussion here about fish, but I didn't see any conclusions.
    >
    >Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    >never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?

    I believe rotisserie roasting does not *require* basting because the rotation of the meat keeps it
    basted with it's own juices. After all, one often bastes with the juices that collect in the bottom
    of the pan.
     
  6. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    I never understood how basting was supposed to work to keep meat/poultry moist inside. Just cook at
    a high enough temp and take the meat/poultry out when it's done, allow the meat to rest, and you'll
    be fine without basting.

    Always rest meat/poultry after roasting/grilling. This allows the food to reabsorb the juices. If
    you slice/carve it right away, all kinds of juice will just run out on to the platter. Let a
    roast/poultry rest 20-45 minutes and it will be much juicer. Let a grilled steak rest until you
    don't see steam coming off of it (5-8 minutes).

    Rotisserie cooking does an internal sort of basting - it's definitely different, and good, and no
    external basting needed.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"

    Bah! Humbug!

    "Ada Ma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi to everybody on RFC,
    >
    > I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    > definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?
    > Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    > for all meat?
    >
    > Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    > never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?
    >
    > Many many thanks to all.
    >
    > Ada
     
  7. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> writes:

    >I never understood how basting was supposed to work to keep meat/poultry moist inside.

    Basting is NOT supposed to work to keep meat/poultry moist inside... if only you could think...
    oops, anudder of those EDU dummys.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  8. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "Ada Ma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi to everybody on RFC,
    >
    > I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    > definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?
    > Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    > for all meat?
    >
    > Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    > never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?
    >
    > Many many thanks to all.
    >
    > Ada

    First off, if you don't baste, the skin dries out and gets ugly looking. Basting keeps the skin
    moist and the immediate meat below the skin moist.

    As for stupidmarket roasting machines, they are rotisserrie's <sp> . They don't need to be basted as
    they are sort of self-basting.
     
  9. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    John Gaughan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Ada Ma wrote:
    >> I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting.
    >
    >Basting is fairly useless. You get zero penetration. You are better off brining.

    Not only that, but you dump quite a lot of heat every time you open the oven door.

    Basting is as evil as stuffing is.

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage --> http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================
    "It looks great at night. In the day, it winces like a hungover vampire." -James Lileks,
    on Las Vegas
     
  10. Ada Ma

    Ada Ma Guest

    Many thanks for everybody's reply.

    I'm going to roast a chicken tonight and see what happens.

    Cheers, Ada
     
  11. [email protected] (Ada Ma) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi to everybody on RFC,
    >
    > I'm wondering if it is necessary to baste while roasting. Are there some sort of meat that
    > definitely need basting? Most importantly, what does basting add to the finished product?
    > Sometimes people recommend that one should rest a roasted bird before cutting - is this necessary
    > for all meat?
    >
    > Lastly, you see those supermarkets / fastfood store that have chicken roasting machines - well I
    > never see them baste their chicken is it because the rotation sort of replaces basting?
    >
    > Many many thanks to all.
    >
    > Ada

    I think basting is a matter of the cook's choice. No, you don't have to do it, and your roast will
    probably turn out fine. I _choose_ to baste roast chickens and turkeys fairly frequently during
    roasting with the juices in the pan, as I think it results in a nicer looking main course, and
    better gravy drippings. I generally choose to slow roast birds at a lower heat,about 300 to 325
    degrees and I baste every twenty minutes to half an hour, or whenever I remember to do it. They
    finish being very moist and tender, but a higher oven temperature for a shorter roasting time is
    also fine. Maybe it's all in my head, but I do think a basted bird has more moisture, and is
    slightly more flavorful. I basted a leg of lamb with lemon and garlic butter during roasting , and
    the result was delicious. Letting a bird or a roast rest for a little bit before carving is a good
    idea, as almost everyone else has already pointed out.

    Melissa
     
  12. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ada Ma <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Many thanks for everybody's reply.
    >
    >I'm going to roast a chicken tonight and see what happens.

    I'm one of the ones (hopefully not the only one) who said that basting was bogus, because you lose
    too much heat. However, last night I grilled a spatchcocked chicken using a recipe from Cuisine at
    Home magazine -- they specify that you should baste it with a mixture of lime juice and chopped
    cilantro during the last 15 minutes.

    It was great. But remember, by this time it doesn't really matter if you dump some heat;
    additionally, you build it up again fairly quickly on a gas grill. And it really did bring a lot of
    flavor to the bird -- the dry, crackly skin really soaked up a lot of the lime juice.

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage --> http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================
    "Grown men are not comfortable explaining why they want to use the sniper rifle on fictional dogs
    with speech impediments." -James Lileks
     
Loading...