Is it cold where you are? Do you still feel like riding?



G

Greens

Guest
I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
the muscle you've built up this summer."

I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
for my walks I guess.
 
T

tiborg

Guest
On Oct 17, 3:33 pm, "Greens" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> the muscle you've built up this summer."
>
> I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
> and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
> Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
> on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
> approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
> trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
> high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
> slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
> terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
> clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
> it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
> for my walks I guess.


Riding saves me about $8.50 a day in train fair, more than enough
motivation to get out rain or shine.
 
On Oct 17, 8:33 am, "Greens" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> the muscle you've built up this summer."
>
> I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
> and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
> Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
> on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
> approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
> trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
> high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
> slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
> terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
> clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
> it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
> for my walks I guess.


Proper clothes makes all the difference for cycling in **** weather.

As far as weight loss goes, I think "nordic walking" works just as
well for most folks, particularly for people with lots of extra
weight. If you give it a try, rember it isn't just walking with poles,
there is a definite technique.

Joseph
 
C

Chris Nelson

Guest
On Oct 17, 2:33 am, "Greens" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> the muscle you've built up this summer."
>
> I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
> and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
> Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
> on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
> approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
> trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
> high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
> slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
> terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
> clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
> it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
> for my walks I guess.


Get an MTB and ride through the falling trees instead of walking. More
fun than a barrel of bladed spokes.

Chris
 
On Oct 17, 1:33 am, "Greens" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> the muscle you've built up this summer."
>
> I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
> and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
> Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
> on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
> approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
> trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
> high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
> slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
> terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
> clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
> it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
> for my walks I guess.


For my daily 17-mile Chicago commute, winter cold never stops me. But
bike clothing for winter cold and rain/snow needs to be light weight
and packable, so that means Gore-Tex http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gore-Tex
, which is not cheap. Gaiters are essential for both rain and cold
http://tinyurl.com/32msbf .

The only days I don't ride are when there has been a heavy overnight
snow, and the streets have not been plowed yet. Or if there is a heavy
snowfall forecast for the workday hours, so I would need to ride home
in a snowstorm. Last winter there were only two such days.

- Jay
 
D

Doug Smith W9WI

Guest
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 02:33:39 -0400, Greens wrote:
> I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> the muscle you've built up this summer."


That's when the other side of my brain reminds me of how I felt when I was
40 pounds heavier.....

I'll ride all winter here. (Nashville area, it's rarely below 40F at ride
time ~9am)

But not on rainy winter days. Then, I stay inside & use the trainer.
 
V

vey

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

>
> The only days I don't ride are when there has been a heavy overnight
> snow, and the streets have not been plowed yet.


Having grown up in the South, I know nothing about riding a bicycle in
ice and snow.
Twenty years ago, at the age of 32, I had to drive a car in Helena
Montana for a week in December.
As I recall, since the town was sparsely populated, I could drive very
slowly, but it also
meant that the streets were not well maintained. I would softly apply
the brakes mid-block and slide up to the stop sign.

I can't even imagine riding a bike on icy streets like that. How is that
done? Studded tires? Do those work?
 
On Oct 17, 7:52 am, vey <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>
> > The only days I don't ride are when there has been a heavy overnight
> > snow, and the streets have not been plowed yet.

>
> Having grown up in the South, I know nothing about riding a bicycle in
> ice and snow.
> Twenty years ago, at the age of 32, I had to drive a car in Helena
> Montana for a week in December.
> As I recall, since the town was sparsely populated, I could drive very
> slowly, but it also
> meant that the streets were not well maintained. I would softly apply
> the brakes mid-block and slide up to the stop sign.
>
> I can't even imagine riding a bike on icy streets like that. How is that
> done? Studded tires? Do those work?


In Chicago, when there is even a slight dusting of snow, the city
spreads truckloads of road salt on the streets. Since most winter days
have a daily high temperature of at least 20 degrees F, that warmth
combined with the midday sun melts much of the road snow and ice, on
the major streets. On the residential side streets, the salt tends to
only remove the snow and ice in the two paths where the car tires make
contact with the pavement. (The car tires crush the salt chunks.) So a
bike rider needs to carefully ride in those narrow paths.

Sometimes when there is a really cold spell in Jan, and there is a
stretch of road which has not been salted, the car tires turn the snow
into very hard packed snow, or ice. This only happens on side streets.
You need to walk the bike past those spots. Sometimes I will ride
through it, if I can just coast, and not try to turn at all.

The biggest nuisance about winter weather is keeping the bike's moving
parts clean and lubed. This can be almost a daily activity, which
tends to get tiresome by late Feb.

I have considered studded tires, but I have never tried them. I am
concerned about how they would handle on bare pavement.

- Jay
 
D

datakoll

Guest
living in ATL, 1974, I drove out to the bypass commuting to work
and...
we were the only car on the interstate.
i was passed by and saw but one car, rallyman driving a dodge dart.
mild snowstorm.

no, its 80 degrees, the ocean calm, a fresh breeze from the bahamas. a
rocket launch at 8:23 was a ripper carrying a light load
zammmmmmmmmmmm into space, no hanging around.
flasssssssssssshhhhhhhhhhhrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
you need a period for adjustment. nutrition, W/P/B, a trainer.
correct clothing. burning off the energy keeps you warm - x-country
skiing is best done naked.

the forest welcomed you.
 
D

datakoll

Guest
Areas of pennsylvania see freezing rain, glare ice and on chilly but
soon pleasantly sunny day.
drivers drive over there to drive.
there's a section in the blue ridge with a median strip where you can
spin, loop over the median, catch the spin and spin off in the
opposite direction.
Asked how he loosend up in the morning, the TdF rider said he headed
into the wind full tilt for an hour then ...
but begin with a good breakfast and a wallop of Italian coffee
 
A

Andrew Price

Guest
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 10:24:41 -0000, "[email protected]"
<[email protected]> wrote:

[---]

>As far as weight loss goes, I think "nordic walking" works just as
>well for most folks, particularly for people with lots of extra
>weight. If you give it a try, rember it isn't just walking with poles,
>there is a definite technique.


I often wondered about that - I've only ever seen it in Germany, where
it is most commonly practised by grim-faced middle-aged women with a
crazed expression on their face...
 
On Oct 17, 7:51 pm, Andrew Price <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 10:24:41 -0000, "[email protected]"
>
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> [---]
>
> >As far as weight loss goes, I think "nordic walking" works just as
> >well for most folks, particularly for people with lots of extra
> >weight. If you give it a try, rember it isn't just walking with poles,
> >there is a definite technique.

>
> I often wondered about that - I've only ever seen it in Germany, where
> it is most commonly practised by grim-faced middle-aged women with a
> crazed expression on their face...


http://www.nordicwalking.com/portal/nordic_walking/english/technique/

The facial expression is optional.

Joseph
 
J

Jay Beattie

Guest
On Oct 17, 5:29 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Oct 17, 1:33 am, "Greens" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > I was going strong until about a week and a half ago. We had a warm spell
> > and it was about seventy fahrenheit. Then I went out one evening and ran
> > into a cold 25mph headwind followed by drizzle, followed by rain and
> > temperatures of about 55. Yuck! I'd been crabbing about hot weather all
> > summer. I finally get some nice cool weather and it kills all my desire to
> > bicycle. There's just something about cold, wet windy weather that to me
> > says, "It's over. Come back next spring when you're fat and you've lost all
> > the muscle you've built up this summer."

>
> > I started taking long walks in the woods. Headwinds don't bother me walking
> > and it just feels right even though bicycling is a much better work out.
> > Comically enough (if you remember my safety concerns) I was strolling along
> > on my second visit to the woods when I heard what sounded like an
> > approaching missle and then a "POOM" kind of noise. When I looked back, the
> > trail was covered with yellow smoke. A long dead tree, maybe a hundred feet
> > high and totally without branches or bark had fallen in light winds and
> > slammed onto the trail I'd just walked over five seconds before with
> > terrific force. Without branches it moved silently except for a couple of
> > clunks and that approaching missle noise just before impact. Nothing to slow
> > it down but one little sapling at the end. I'm going to need an iron cage
> > for my walks I guess.

>
> For my daily 17-mile Chicago commute, winter cold never stops me. But
> bike clothing for winter cold and rain/snow needs to be light weight
> and packable, so that means Gore-Texhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gore-Tex
> , which is not cheap. Gaiters are essential for both rain and coldhttp://tinyurl.com/32msbf.
>
> The only days I don't ride are when there has been a heavy overnight
> snow, and the streets have not been plowed yet. Or if there is a heavy
> snowfall forecast for the workday hours, so I would need to ride home
> in a snowstorm. Last winter there were only two such days.
>


I make it a point to ride on the days we are forecast for snow in PDX
(which are rare) because the drivers around here go totally nuts --
its like a herd of scared cows. Traffic ties up and it takes hours to
drive a few miles. Meanwhile, I ride home on a peaceful bike path
over rolling hills on that squeaky fresh snow. Now, when it freezes
over and turns to ice, then I'm screwed and have to stay off my bike
for a day or two. Even though we get snow sometimes and plenty of rain
and ice, it never gets that cold. I could not imagine riding in sub-
zero Chicago weather. That is neoprene face mask and goggles weather,
at least according to our local news. -- Jay Beattie..
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 02:33:39 -0400, Greens wrote:

No, it's spring here, and the weather is beautiful - just been out for
an early morning beach ride and coffee with friends. Winter was mild
and dry, too, so I've had no trouble maintaining 5-600km/week.

Y'all have a nice winter up there. I wouldn't swap with you :)
 
S

Steve Gravrock

Guest
On 2007-10-17, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

> I have considered studded tires, but I have never tried them. I am
> concerned about how they would handle on bare pavement.


I have Nokian Mount and Ground tires:
<http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp>, and scroll down a
bit.

They handle better than typical MTB knobby tires on dry pavement, but
I doubt that they could be pushed through corners quite as hard as a
slick. The studs make lots of noise but don't seem to hurt the handling.
 
S

Steve Gravrock

Guest
On 2007-10-17, vey <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>
>>
>> The only days I don't ride are when there has been a heavy overnight
>> snow, and the streets have not been plowed yet.

>
> Having grown up in the South, I know nothing about riding a bicycle in
> ice and snow.
> Twenty years ago, at the age of 32, I had to drive a car in Helena
> Montana for a week in December.
> As I recall, since the town was sparsely populated, I could drive very
> slowly, but it also
> meant that the streets were not well maintained. I would softly apply
> the brakes mid-block and slide up to the stop sign.



It's an acquired skill. So is riding and even walking on ice.

> I can't even imagine riding a bike on icy streets like that. How is that
> done? Studded tires? Do those work?


They work. I used to use regular mountain bike tires in the winter,
which were good enough for most conditions but not ideal. I finally got
studded tires last year after trying to change lanes in snow and slush
that turned out to be covering a layer of rutted ice. Studs help a lot
with that.

Hard packed snow and ice is the next best thing to pavement, especially
if there's sand or gravel mixed in. Studs are not necessary there. In
loose snow that doesn't have ice underneath, the studs themselves don't
make a difference but the narrower width of most snow tires makes for
easier going than with wide mountain bike tires. You can ride smooth
ice without studs, but they help a lot.

More than you ever wanted to know: <http://www.icebike.com/>