Is LiteSpeed any good?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Scott'sTrek1000, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. Scott'sTrek1000

    Scott'sTrek1000 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a Trek 1000 now, learned the ropes, and am now ready to move on to something better. I have been researching and like the sound and looks of the LiteSpeed. I'm not sure what I'm gonna spend on my next bike, so haven't really checked the different models. What is the general consensus on these bikes? If I were to get one, which model would be the best for me (i only ride about 100 (plan to double that) miles per week, have a big group ride on the weekend (30'ish miles...but plan to increase this to a minimum of 50) and want to get in to competing in local races of 100 miles...working up to a June race of 300 miles over 3 days....much in the mountains.

    Sorry so long..Just very anxious to make the next step.
     
    Tags:


  2. gruppo

    gruppo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    With the number of miles you plan to ride, I think you need to broaden your choices considerably. This next bike will be a much bigger purchase (I assume), not like buying an entry level bike where you can just say "OK, I'll take that one over there."

    There are an abundance of great bikes out there. You owe it to yourself to shop around and ride all of them that look appealing -- how else will you know what's really right for you? You won't find out looking at a spec sheet.
     
  3. rayner

    rayner New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2003
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    0
    For what your doing I can't see the point of buying a new bike. If your worried that you're going to get left behind in races get yourself a good pair of wheels. Litespeed are severly overpriced (here anyway) and if your worrying about weight (which you must be otherwise ther'ed be no reason to buy a new horse) only the top of the line ghisallo is right up there. For the money you'd pay for a Litespeed frame you could buy a complete carbon Giant or Trek. Buy Litespeed if you want people to think your loaded, but remember you've still got to ride it (wasn't meant to sound nasty but its just the way it is). If you feel like you really really need a bike do what gruppo said, ride anything you can get your hands on. If you really want a ti frame go for something like Airborne, much cheaper but apparently the same feel. If you want stiff go cannondale. Carbon go Giant unless you dont like feeling any road at all and then go Trek. Theres heaps of options out there, don't just confine yourself to the "wanky" bikes just because they'll make you look good standing next to them.

    Sorry that this is so negative but I really hate people buying super expensive stuff when they havent done the miles on the ordinary stuff. the biggest improvement you can make is to just ride more. No bike will make up for that. Good luck.
     
  4. Mansmind

    Mansmind New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2004
    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    1
    To answer your question directly....yes, they're considered to be good frames.

    Like one of the other poster's said however, if you're ready to invest that many $$ on a good frame/bike, why not take your time? There are manygood frames out there, and some you will like better than others. Try them all and see which one fits YOU the best...looks, feel, and geometry. In the end, it's you that has to be happy with whatever you decide.

    Good luck!
     
  5. dhk

    dhk New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    2,259
    Likes Received:
    0
    Agree with the posts above. Recommend you spend the fall/winter reading and test riding as many bikes as possible. Learn what kind of ride you like, and what fit you need and want, before buying a new bike.

    When you start shopping, suggest you walk into an LBS with a metric tape measure (the fabric kind work well). Knowing the dimension range you're looking for on seat tubes and top tubes, and being able to check the frames quickly will cut through a lot
    of the BS.

    Don't place much value on weight. A pound more on a bike is alot better than having a frame or wheels that break on you in a couple of seasons. And if any salesman quotes bike weight, ask him to put it on the scale. If the LBS doesn't have one, ignore anything he says about weight.

    Before you test ride, make sure the tires are all inflated to your favorite pressure, since tire pressures make a huge difference in ride and handling. Depends on your weight of course, but at 170 lbs, I like 100 psi front, 105 back. If the LBS won't take the time to correct the tire pressures before you test ride, go to another dealer.

    Last, remember on many mid-priced and higher bikes, you can order a frame and have the LBS build it up with your choice of components and wheels. If you don't like the mix that's on the frame you want, ask about options. Enjoy your shopping.
     
  6. rv

    rv New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    yes, litespeeds are worth the money. but, as others have pointed out, there are other fine bikes out there, too. but do some homework and decide exactly what you want in a bike...type of riding and frame material are two important considerations. I have a litespeed and always will, and I have other bikes, too.

    and don't worry about "not putting in enough miles (or something along those lines)" to have a high dollar bike, or whatever drivel some twit writes. that's just petty, socio-economic jealousy. my first road bike was a litespeed. buy what you want and can afford.
     
  7. dhk

    dhk New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    2,259
    Likes Received:
    0
    Scott, are you there? I see you've got about four different threads open at once, but no evidence that you're reading or understanding any of the good advice you're getting. If you're reading these replies, would appreciate your acknowledgement.
     
  8. Scott'sTrek1000

    Scott'sTrek1000 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm hear. I check for new messages ALL DAY AT WORK. That's all I do. Keep 'em coming. Thanks a bunch.
     
  9. TobyW

    TobyW New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I own a litespeed Vortex and it is definitely a beautifully made frame (apart from the cheap decals). However, the ride of the bike doesn't necessarily justify the price and I would say that I got just as much enjoyment out of a Trek 5200 which I owned previously. Personally I think carbon fibre is superior to titanium for road cycling as long as you don't crash!
    I don't know if you're after a titanium litespeed but that is their speciality and the workmanship on their frames is superb.However,don't believe the hype that titanium bikes have a magical feel. It's more important to buy a frame with the correct geometry and sizing. There aren't many TDF riders on titanium bikes so I guess that they also believe carbon is better.

    Hope it helps.
     
  10. gruppo

    gruppo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gimme a break! I don't see many TDF riders on mountain bikes either, so I guess that means road bikes are better than mountain bikes? How many of us ride in stage races? Ti and carbon are two different beasts -- you either like the feel or you don't.

    I own both and find they serve entirely different purposes and moods. If I am going to sit on a bike for ours, especially on unknown road, the carbon is my choice. If I want to go out and have fun for a couple of hours with maximum responsiveness and feedback, the Ti is the superior choice.

    When will we get past the constant arguments of "what is best?"
     
Loading...
Loading...