Is losing a pound of body weight the same as losing a pound off the bicycle?

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.soc archive' started by Art Murphy, Mar 20, 2003.

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  1. Art Murphy

    Art Murphy Guest

    Hello All, I don't know if this has been discussed here b4. In hiking it is said that if one were to
    wear footwear that is one pound lighter it is the same as losing six pounds from the backpack. I
    suppose this is because the feet move up in elevation six times more than the torso does during the
    normal stride. My question is about the relationship between losing body weight and bicycle weight.
    Is it basically equal? Will losing body weight give the same benifit as losing the same weight from
    the bicycle. Thanks, Art in Memphis
     
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  2. Bill Zaumen

    Bill Zaumen Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Art Murphy) wrote:

    > Hello All, I don't know if this has been discussed here b4. In hiking it is said that if one were
    > to wear footwear that is one pound lighter it is the same as losing six pounds from the backpack.
    > I suppose this is because the feet move up in elevation six times more than the torso does during
    > the normal stride. My question is about the relationship between losing body weight and bicycle
    > weight. Is it basically equal? Will losing body weight give the same benifit as losing the same
    > weight from the bicycle. Thanks, Art in Memphis

    Are you losing flab or muscles and where is the weight loss supposed to be, and are you concerned
    more with your health or how fast you might go? It's cheaper to take a pound off of you than a pound
    off of the bike, if you are overweight.

    Bill

    --
    Due to the level of spam, I no longer accept email, except from a few select individuals.
     
  3. Art Murphy

    Art Murphy Guest

    [email protected] (Art Murphy) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > My question is about the relationship between losing body weight and bicycle weight. Is it
    > basically equal? Will losing body weight give the same benifit as losing the same weight from
    > the bicycle. Thanks, Art in Memphis

    I just wonder if everything else were equal (which can't be true) would a 160 lb person on a 20
    pound bike perform the same as a 140 lb person on a 40 pound bike? The bike and rider weight equals
    180 pounds. Art
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Art Murphy) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > I just wonder if everything else were equal (which can't be true) would a 160 lb person on a 20
    > pound bike perform the same as a 140 lb person on a 40 pound bike? The bike and rider weight
    > equals 180 pounds.

    What does "everything else were equal" mean? Is the extra 20 pounds fat or bone or muscle? In most
    cases, I'd expect the heavier person to be faster because some portion of that weight will be muscle
    vs. pure dead weight. Losing weight off your body makes sense if you have fat to lose. Once you get
    down to a Lance Armstrong body mass, you can start taking weight off your bike.
     
  5. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Doesn't taking a pound off the wheels have more impact than a pound off the rest of the bike?

    Michael

    "Art Murphy" <[email protected]om> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello All, I don't know if this has been discussed here b4. In hiking it is said that if one were
    > to wear footwear that is one pound lighter it is the same as losing six pounds from the backpack.
    > I suppose this is because the feet move up in elevation six times more than the torso does during
    > the normal stride. My question is about the relationship between losing body weight and bicycle
    > weight. Is it basically equal? Will losing body weight give the same benifit as losing the same
    > weight from the bicycle. Thanks, Art in Memphis
     
  6. Bill Zaumen

    Bill Zaumen Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Michael"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Doesn't taking a pound off the wheels have more impact than a pound off the rest of the bike?

    Only in terms of acceleration. Actually, it is the rims that matter for that: a heavier rim means
    that the wheel's moment of inertia is higher, so you need a higher torque on the wheels to speed up
    the bike. Take a solid versus a hollow cylinder and roll both down a ramp, letting each start from
    the same position from rest. The solid one will reach the bottom in less time.

    Acceleration is important to racers. Otherwise, it isn't important if you are riding long distances
    at a fixed speed - the case where you don't have to stop frequently.

    Bill

    --
    Due to the level of spam, I no longer accept email, except from a few select individuals.
     
  7. Art Murphy

    Art Murphy Guest

    [email protected] (Bill Zaumen) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]t>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Michael"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Doesn't taking a pound off the wheels have more impact than a pound off the rest of the bike?
    Okay: This is more of what I am asking for. Not about muscle and fat. Lets say I am 140 lbs with a
    20 pound pack on my back and a 20 pound bicycle. Is there an appreciable difference if I were 140
    lbs and on a 40 pound bicycle? Both weights equal 180 lbs but the bike is lighter in one of the
    examples, the rider is the same person. Thanks, Art
     
  8. Bill Zaumen

    Bill Zaumen Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Art Murphy) wrote:

    > [email protected] (Bill Zaumen) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]t>...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Michael"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Doesn't taking a pound off the wheels have more impact than a pound
    off the
    > > > rest of the bike?
    > Okay: This is more of what I am asking for. Not about muscle and fat. Lets say I am 140 lbs with a
    > 20 pound pack on my back and a 20 pound bicycle. Is there an appreciable difference if I were 140
    > lbs and on a 40 pound bicycle? Both weights equal 180 lbs but the bike is lighter in one of the
    > examples, the rider is the same person. Thanks,

    You'll have more weight on your hands and you'll use some back or abdominal muscles to support the
    pack. If you stand up, you'll have to lift the pack as well. You'll also see some differences in a
    crosswind.

    Bill

    --
    Due to the level of spam, I no longer accept email, except from a few select individuals.
     
  9. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Bill Zaumen) wrote in news:nobody-2403031847340001
    @adsl-209-233-20-69.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net:
    > You'll have more weight on your hands and you'll use some back or abdominal muscles to support the
    > pack. If you stand up, you'll have to lift the pack as well. You'll also see some differences in a
    > crosswind.

    On the other hand, if you're riding a mountain bike, having the weight on your body instead of your
    bike makes it easier to maneuver around obsticles.
     
  10. I would think that the rotational weight on the wheels, cranks, etc. on the heavier bike would
    severely impair performance of the rider. Also, overall weight isn't particularly relevant as there
    is a huge muscle/mass difference between a 140 and 160 LB rider (given that both are equally fit).

    Rick "Art Murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Art Murphy) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > > My question is about the relationship between losing body weight and bicycle weight. Is it
    > > basically equal? Will losing body weight give the same benifit as losing the same weight from
    > > the bicycle. Thanks, Art in Memphis
    >
    > I just wonder if everything else were equal (which can't be true) would a 160 lb person on a 20
    > pound bike perform the same as a 140 lb person on a 40 pound bike? The bike and rider weight
    > equals 180 pounds. Art
     
  11. > > Doesn't taking a pound off the wheels have more impact than a pound off the rest of the bike?

    There's an article in the latest issue of the British magazine "Cycling Plus" about bike rickshaws
    in London. One of their drivers reports that carrying a passenger drunk enough to have passed out is
    much tougher than carrying an equivalent awake passenger.

    Maybe something about the way a thinking human being shifts their weight makes things easier.

    Jeremy Parker
     
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