Is melanoma a vitamin D deficiency disease?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by feetback, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. feetback

    feetback Guest

    Greetings everyone!

    I realize that most people in the United States consider the natural outdoor sunlight to be the
    cause of skin cancer, but for a moment, can we consider the possibility that the dermatologists have
    gotten it backwards? Melanoma, as everyone must know by now, was the fastest growing cancer during
    the last two decades of efforts to avoid even more sunlight.

    Furthermore, consider for a moment that the United States population at one time was primarily a
    rural farming society and most people spent great amounts of time outdoors completely in the natural
    sun. But by the 1920's and 1930's, just a decade or two before the American Academy of Dermatology
    formed, America had lost its farming identity and was spending its time primarily indoors underneath
    electrical light bulbs emitting no ultraviolet light. In fact, the bone disease rickets became such
    a problem in schooled children that many started to artificially "fortify" foods with vitamin D.

    Unfortunately, the "fortified" foods did not address the needs of the skin, which can easily
    synthesize vitamin D in the presence of sunlight containing UVB wavelengths. Fair-skinned
    individuals are well known for their vitamin D deficiency, but they are also well known for their
    susceptibility to melanoma. Therefore, it seems reasonable that melanoma is a vitamin D deficiency
    disease of the skin.

    I have used similar arguments to demonstrate that basal cell carcinoma could also be a sunlight
    deficiency disease in the UVA spectrum, and that squamous cell carcinoma is a UVC-deficiency
    disease. You may find the full text of my explanation at my website:

    http://www.shoebusters.com

    Dermatologists are famous for their ABC rule of categorizing moles on the skin. Now they may
    have another ABC rule, that concerning deficiency in various wavelength components to the
    natural sunlight.

    I am extremely interested in all discussion concerning these ideas, and welcome any opinions,
    skepticism, comments, feedback or any questions, here in the newsgroups or directly to me. Thank you
    very much. :)
     
    Tags:


  2. Madiba

    Madiba Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Unfortunately, the "fortified" foods did not address the needs of the skin, which can easily
    > synthesize vitamin D in the presence of sunlight containing UVB wavelengths. Fair-skinned
    > individuals are well known for their vitamin D deficiency, but they are also well known for their
    > susceptibility to melanoma. Therefore, it seems reasonable that melanoma is a vitamin D deficiency
    > disease of the skin.
    This seems to be the crux of your argument, and it is devoid of all logic. Even if we do not get
    enough sunshine (which I disagree with in todays outdoor oriented lifestyle) and are orally
    supplementing vit D this means the skin is getting enough vit D as well. You have a knack of putting
    the horse before the cart: Fair-skinned individuals are more capable of producing vit D than dark-
    skinned ones so they won't get rickets. You are confusing the pictures of those pale individuals
    that never got sunshine (industrial revolution time) with fair-skinned (blonde/red-haired) folk. The
    fair skin that protects northerners against such crippling disorders as rickets also puts them at
    high risk of melanoma. Dark skin protects against melanoma; white Americans have melanoma rates
    about 20 times higher than black Americans, according to the National Cancer Institute.
    --
    madiba
     
  3. feetback

    feetback Guest

    [email protected] (madiba) wrote in message news:<1g6aevu.1jn4nrm7fz534N%[email protected]>...
    > Even if we do not get enough sunshine (which I disagree with in todays outdoor oriented
    > lifestyle) ...

    What do you mean by "today's outdoor oriented lifestyle"?

    According to census statistics, the United States is no longer a rural farming society, but during
    the 1800's, it was. People at that time spent most of their week completely outdoors in the sun,
    with no sunscreens, no sunglasses, and none of our modern-day fears of natural light. Now over a
    century later, many adults who work in office environments probably spend much less than 1/3 of
    their week getting any natural sunlight.

    The dramatic increase of skin cancer in the United States during the 1900's seems to have coincided
    with the decline of our farming identity and the rise of the electrical light bulb and the
    automobile in the 1920's. The electrical light bulbs in our homes are typically devoid of
    ultraviolet light, and produce a more yellowish light unbalanced in the natural spectrum. The window
    glass in automobiles and homes filters out most of the ultraviolet light, but allows the longer
    wavelengths to pass and shine on exposed skin.

    Therefore, it seems reasonable that avoiding natural outdoor sunlight in favor of artificial or
    unbalanced lighted environments produces skin cancer in humans.

    Somebody actually did an experiment to test this hypothesis. During the 1960's, the pioneer of time-
    lapse photography and photobiology,
    Dr. John Ott demonstrated that exposure to unbalanced light produces skin cancer in animals. He
    observed changes in their mood and behavior and also noted increased calcification of the
    heart muscle, probably due to the lack of vitamin D being photosynthesized in the skin. When
    animals with skin cancer were exposed to natural sunlight, the skin showed remarkable ability
    to heal itself.

    Why do you suppose dermatologists continue to ignore Dr. Ott's eye-opening experimental evidence?
     
  4. Madiba

    Madiba Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > What do you mean by "today's outdoor oriented lifestyle"?
    Are you stuck in a backstreet New York ghetto or what? Never wonder why people like to be tanned,
    why so much sport is played? Quality time is sunshine time in the garden with the family. Part-time,
    flexitime, more holidays, - all contribute to people spending more time in the sun, and thus to the
    rise in melanoma rates. Look at California, Australia. When you compare the melanoma rates of the
    19th and 20th centuries you're forgetting that people live much longer nowdays and are thus more
    likely to get any kind of cancer. Also tanning was not 'in' back in the 19th century so although
    rural people spent a lot of time outdoors they were clothed and wore hats. Not the slaves of course,
    but their natural skin melanin levels were high enough to give them good protection from the sun.
    --
    madiba
     
  5. feetback

    feetback Guest

    [email protected] (madiba) wrote in message news:<1g6c91u.x183hbvcpnqkN%[email protected]>...
    > When you compare the melanoma rates of the 19th and 20th centuries you're forgetting that people
    > live much longer nowdays and are thus more likely to get any kind of cancer.

    The Japanese are some of the longest-lived on the planet, but yet they exhibit cancer rates
    dramatically lower than the United States. Living longer does not appear to increase your risk
    of cancer.

    Melanoma, in particular, began affecting many in their teens and 20's during the 1980's and 1990's,
    practically unheard of in prior decades in the United States. Teenagers are extremely young to be
    getting a disease that many dermatologists claim arises from overexposure to natural light coming
    from our sun. Furthermore, some dermatologists claim that melanoma has a 20 to 30-year "latency
    period", which indicates that teenagers should not even be getting the disease anyway.

    During the 1970's, sunscreen lotions became hugely popular, but their application is dubious and
    questionable. In 1972, a major manufacturer released a famous system of identifying a lotion with
    its ability to block UVB ultraviolet radiation from natural sunlight. According to CDC statistics,
    melanoma rates jumped an alarming 4% during the very next year in 1973. In 1978 the United States
    government strangely declared that "sunscreens prevent skin cancer", and melanoma rates proceeded to
    skyrocket, doubling over the last couple of decades, affecting even younger ages than ever before.

    Vitamin D is rarely found naturally in foods, but the essential vitamin is naturally
    photosynthesized in the skin when exposed to UVB light coming naturally from our sun. Using a
    sunscreen lotion produces vitamin D-deficiency in the skin and throughout the entire body. If you
    would still like us to avoid natural light coming from the sun, how would you suggest we make up for
    the lack of vitamin D in our skin and bodies?
     
  6. Madiba

    Madiba Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] (madiba) wrote in message news...
    > > When you compare the melanoma rates of the 19th and 20th centuries you're forgetting that people
    > > live much longer nowdays and are thus more likely to get any kind of cancer.
    >
    > The Japanese are some of the longest-lived on the planet, but yet they exhibit cancer rates
    > dramatically lower than the United States. Living longer does not appear to increase your risk
    > of cancer.
    You're comparing apple with oranges again.. Different region, different genes, different cancers.
    They have less breast cancer, more stomach cancer. The tanning 'culture' didn't catch on there so
    I'd guess their melanoma rates are lower too, right?

    > Melanoma, in particular, began affecting many in their teens and 20's during the 1980's and
    > 1990's, practically unheard of in prior decades in the United States. Teenagers are extremely
    > young to be getting a disease that many dermatologists claim arises from overexposure to
    > natural light coming from our sun. Furthermore, some dermatologists claim that melanoma has a
    > 20 to 30-year "latency period", which indicates that teenagers should not even be getting the
    > disease anyway.
    Pediatric melanomas tell us that further factors are involved in it's etiology -probably
    environmental cofactors like pollution which reduce the body's ability to fight cancer.
    >
    > Vitamin D is rarely found naturally in foods, but the essential vitamin is naturally
    > photosynthesized in the skin when exposed to UVB light coming naturally from our sun. Using a
    > sunscreen lotion produces vitamin D-deficiency in the skin and throughout the entire body. If you
    > would still like us to avoid natural light coming from the sun, how would you suggest we make up
    > for the lack of vitamin D in our skin and bodies?
    Drink a glass of milk a day, for example. Plenty of Vit D in many foods.

    --
    madiba
     
  7. feetback

    feetback Guest

    [email protected] (madiba) wrote in message news:<1g6e3k1.craonno40sn1N%[email protected]>...
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > The Japanese are some of the longest-lived on the planet, but yet they exhibit cancer rates
    > > dramatically lower than the United States. Living longer does not appear to increase your risk
    > > of cancer.
    > You're comparing apple with oranges again.. Different region, different genes, different cancers.
    > They have less breast cancer, more stomach cancer.

    You seem to be implying that stomach cancer depends on the region of the world and genetics. Stomach
    cancer may indeed be relatively rare in the United States now, but at one time, during the 1930's,
    decade of The Great Depression, America exhibited one of the highest rates in the entire world,
    particularly among men. I do not see how you can blame climate and genes for this discrepancy.

    Something else seems to be responsible for stomach cancer in humans. I wonder if all the excessive
    worrying about the future during The Great Depression had anything to do with the high rate of
    stomach cancer at that time?

    > > If you would still like us to avoid natural light coming from the sun, how would you suggest we
    > > make up for the lack of vitamin D in our skin and bodies?
    > Drink a glass of milk a day, for example. Plenty of Vit D in many foods.

    Vitamin D is found in milk produced only after the American Academy of Dermatology formed, in the
    1930's. During the 1800's, however, getting vitamin D through food alone required eating certain
    fish products because it is not normally found in most food naturally. Even today, some 70 years
    later as you noted, this growth hormone is added artificially to our milk and to our other foods.

    It seems that Nature intended for us to get outside in the sunlight, using no sunscreens of course,
    to photosynthesize our own vitamin D in the skin. Modern dermatologists, however, contend that we
    should minimize our exposure to natural outdoor sunlight, and just drink artificially-"fortified"
    liquids while staying indoors. Who are we to believe? Nature or our modern dermatologists?
     
  8. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Mon, 22 Dec 2003 23:56:03 +0100 in article
    <1g6e3k1.craonno40sn1N%[email protected]> [email protected] (madiba) wrote:

    >Drink a glass of milk a day, for example. Plenty of Vit D in many foods.

    According to the current knowledge this is incorrect. Fish is the best dietary sourece of vitamin D,
    but it's not easy to get enough vitamin D even from fish. See

    Calvo MS, Whiting SJ. Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in Canada and the United States:
    importance to health status and efficacy of current food fortification and dietary supplement use.
    Nutr Rev. 2003 Mar;61(3):107-13. Review. PMID: 12723644 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://-
    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12723644&dopt=Abstract>

    "Several recent studies have identified a surprisingly high prevalence of vitamin D
    insufficiency in otherwise healthy adults living in Canada and the United States. Most striking
    are the effects of latitude, season, and race. Also noteworthy is that dietary vitamin D is not
    reaching the population in greatest need, nor is it very protective against insufficiency. Fluid
    milk, as the predominant vehicle for vitamin D fortification, is apparently not very effective
    in staving off vitamin D insufficiency in adults in all populations at all times of the year."

    Zittermann A. Vitamin D in preventive medicine: are we ignoring the evidence? Br J Nutr. 2003 May;89(5):552-
    72. Review. PMID: 12720576 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q-
    uery.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12720576&dopt=Abstract>

    "Vitamin D is metabolised by a hepatic 25-hydroxylase into 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and by
    a renal 1alpha- hydroxylase into the vitamin D hormone calcitriol. Calcitriol receptors are
    present in more than thirty different tissues. Apart from the kidney, several tissues also
    possess the enzyme 1alpha-hydroxylase, which is able to use circulating 25(OH)D as a substrate.
    Serum levels of 25(OH)D are the best indicator to assess vitamin D deficiency, insufficiency,
    hypovitaminosis, adequacy, and toxicity. European children and young adults often have
    circulating 25(OH)D levels in the insufficiency range during wintertime. Elderly subjects have
    mean 25(OH)D levels in the insufficiency range throughout the year. In institutionalized
    subjects 25(OH)D levels are often in the deficiency range. There is now general agreement that a
    low vitamin D status is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Moreover, vitamin D
    insufficiency can lead to a disturbed muscle function. Epidemiological data also indicate a low
    vitamin D status in tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel
    diseases, hypertension, and specific types of cancer. Some intervention trials have demonstrated
    that supplementation with vitamin D or its metabolites is able: (i) to reduce blood pressure in
    hypertensive patients; (ii) to improve blood glucose levels in diabetics; (iii) to improve
    symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The oral dose necessary to achieve
    adequate serum 25(OH)D levels is probably much higher than the current recommendations of 5-15
    microg/d."

    Allain TJ, Dhesi J. Hypovitaminosis D in older adults. Gerontology. 2003 Sep-Oct;49(5):273-8.
    Review. PMID: 12920346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query-
    .fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12920346&dopt=Abstract>

    "Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly recognised as a common problem among older adults. ..."

    Holick MF. Evolution and function of vitamin D. Recent Results Cancer Res. 2003;164:3-28. Review.
    PMID: 12899511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cm-
    d=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12899511&dopt=Abstract>

    "... The insights into the new biological functions of 1,25(OH)2D in regulating cell growth,
    modulating the immune system and modulating the renin-angiotensin system provides an
    explanation for why diminished sun exposure at higher latitudes is associated with increased
    risk of dying of many common cancers, developing type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, and
    having a higher incidence of hypertension. Another calciotropic hormone that is also produced
    in the skin, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, is also a potent inhibitor of squamous cell
    proliferation. ..."

    Vieth R, Cole DE, Hawker GA, Trang HM, Rubin LA. Wintertime vitamin D insufficiency is common in
    young Canadian women, and their vitamin D intake does not prevent it. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Dec;55(12):1091-
    7. PMID: 11781676 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi-
    ?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11781676&dopt=Abstract>

    Guillemant J, Le HT, Maria A, Allemandou A, Peres G, Guillemant S. Wintertime vitamin D deficiency
    in male adolescents: effect on parathyroid function and response to vitamin D3 supplements.
    Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(10):875-9. PMID: 11716192 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.nc-
    bi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11716192&dopt=Abstract>

    "... The constant vitamin D wintertime deficiency and wintertime rise in iPTH in adolescent
    French males throughout puberty has been demonstrated. ..."

    Kauppinen-Makelin R, Tahtela R, Loyttyniemi E, Karkkainen J, Valimaki MJ. A high prevalence of
    hypovitaminosis D in Finnish medical in- and outpatients. J Intern Med. 2001 Jun;249(6):559-63.
    PMID: 11422663 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cm-
    d=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11422663&dopt=Abstract>

    "... CONCLUSION: Hypovitaminosis D is very common amongst Finnish in-

    females. ..."

    Semba RD, Garrett E, Johnson BA, Guralnik JM, Fried LP. R Vitamin D deficiency among older women
    with and without disability. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Dec;72(6):1529-34. PMID: 11101482 [PubMed -
    indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/72/6/1529>

    "... CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency, a preventable disorder, is a common and important public
    health problem for older disabled women living in the community; black women are at higher risk
    than are white women."

    Harris SS, Soteriades E, Coolidge JA, Mudgal S, Dawson-Hughes B. R Vitamin D insufficiency and
    hyperparathyroidism in a low income, multiracial, elderly population. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000
    Nov;85(11):4125-30. PMID: 11095443 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    <URL:http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/85/11/4125>

    "... Elderly individuals who live in northern areas, particularly African-Americans, should be
    strongly encouraged to increase their vitamin D intake, especially in winter. ..."

    Glerup H, Mikkelsen K, Poulsen L, Hass E, Overbeck S, Thomsen J, Charles P, Eriksen EF Commonly
    recommended daily intake of vitamin D is not sufficient if sunlight exposure is limited. J Intern
    Med 2000 Feb;247(2):260-8 <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed-
    &list_uids=10692090&dopt=Abstract>

    Lehtonen-Veromaa M, Mottonen T, Irjala K, Karkkainen M, Lamberg-Allardt C, Hakola P, Viikari J
    Vitamin D intake is low and hypovitaminosis D common in healthy 9- to 15-year-old Finnish girls. Eur
    J Clin Nutr 1999 Sep;53(9):746-51 <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retriev-
    e&db=PubMed&list_uids=10509773&dopt=Abstract>

    "... CONCLUSION: Hypovitaminosis D is fairly common in growing Finnish girls in the wintertime,
    and three months of vitamin D supplementation with 10 microg/d was insufficient in preventing
    hypovitaminosis D. ..."

    Melissa K. Thomas, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Ravi I. Thadhani, Albert C. Shaw, Donald J. Deraska,
    Barrett T. Kitch, Eleftherios C. Vamvakas, Ian M. Dick, Richard L. Prince, Joel S. Finkelstein
    Hypovitaminosis D in Medical Inpatients The New England Journal of Medicine -- March 19, 1998 --
    Vol. 338, No. 12 <URL:http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/338/12/777>

    "... CONCLUSIONS: Hypovitaminosis D is common in general medical inpatients, including those
    with vitamin D intakes exceeding the recommended daily allowance and those without apparent risk
    factors for vitamin D deficiency."

    Chapuy MC, Preziosi P, Maamer M, Arnaud S, Galan P, Hercberg S, Meunier PJ Prevalence of vitamin D
    insufficiency in an adult normal population. Osteoporos Int 1997;7(5):439-43 <URL:http://www.ncbi.n-
    lm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9425501&dopt=Abstract>

    "... These results showed that in French normal adults living in an urban environment with a
    lack of direct exposure to sunshine, diet failed to provide an adequate amount of vitamin D. It
    is important to pay attention to this rather high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in the
    general adult population and to discuss the clinical utility of winter supplementation with low
    doses of vitamin D."

    Webb AR, Kline L, Holick MF. Influence of season and latitude on the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin
    D3: exposure to winter sunlight in Boston and Edmonton will not promote vitamin D3 synthesis in
    human skin. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1988 Aug;67(2):373-8. PMID: 2839537; UI: 88273469 <URL:http://-
    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2839537&dopt=Abstract>

    "... In Edmonton (52 degrees N) this ineffective winter period extended from October through
    March. Further south (34 degrees N and 18 degrees N), sunlight effectively photoconverted 7-
    dehydrocholesterol to previtamin D3 in the middle of winter. These results quantify the dramatic
    influence of changes in solar UVB radiation on cutaneous vitamin D3 synthesis and indicate the
    latitudinal increase in the length of the "vitamin D winter" during which dietary
    supplementation of the vitamin may be advisable."

    Webb AR, DeCosta BR, Holick MF. Sunlight regulates the cutaneous production of vitamin D3 by
    causing its photodegradation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989 May;68(5):882-7. PMID: 2541158; UI:
    89234461 <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=25-
    41158&dopt=Abstract>

    Vieth, R., Chan, P.-C. R, MacFarlane, G. D (2001). Efficacy and safety of vitamin D3 intake
    exceeding the lowest observed adverse effect level. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 73: 288-294
    <URL:http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/73/2/288>

    Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, and safety. Am J Clin Nutr.
    1999 May;69(5):842-56. Review. <URL:http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/69/5/842>

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
  9. Madiba

    Madiba Guest

    Matti Narkia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > <[email protected]> [email protected] (madiba) wrote:
    > >Drink a glass of milk a day, for example. Plenty of Vit D in many foods.
    >
    > According to the current knowledge this is incorrect. Fish is the best dietary sourece of vitamin
    > D, but it's not easy to get enough vitamin D even from fish.
    I gave an example of a vit D source, I did not say it was the best source. I would not recommend
    fish now with the mercury contamination.. Your dietary requirement of vit D also depends where you
    live (lattitude) and the pigmentation of your skin.

    --
    madiba
     
  10. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:09:27 +0100 in article
    <1g6qwv5.rpafakji71moN%[email protected]> [email protected] (madiba) wrote:

    >Matti Narkia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> <[email protected]> [email protected] (madiba) wrote:
    >> >Drink a glass of milk a day, for example. Plenty of Vit D in many foods.
    >>
    >> According to the current knowledge this is incorrect. Fish is the best dietary sourece of vitamin
    >> D, but it's not easy to get enough vitamin D even from fish.
    >I gave an example of a vit D source, I did not say it was the best source. I would not recommend
    >fish now with the mercury contamination..

    Benefits of eating fish twice a week outweigh risks. Small fish like sardines contain less
    contaminants than large predatory fish. Still, even eating fish twice a week will not provide enough
    witamin D in winter time for those living outside 40th latitudes far north and south, supplements
    may be required as research suggests.

    >Your dietary requirement of vit D also depends where you live (lattitude) and the pigmentation of
    >your skin.

    Exactly, as the references I provided pointed out.

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
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