Is my frittata a quiche??

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy, Nov 30, 2005.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    This morning I decided to make a frittata.

    I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.

    I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    oven for 15 minutes.

    It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    more like quiche than a frittata.

    Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)

    In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    sprinkled with parmesan cheese.

    --
    Andy
     
    Tags:


  2. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Andy" <q> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >
    > --
    > Andy


    Perhaps you shoudn't put milk!
    Cheers and welcome
    Pandora
     
  3. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >
    > --
    > Andy


    Hi Andy,
    We make this in a larger fry pan just like you did and it comes out much
    thinner. We call ours frittata. We put anything in it we can conjure up
    from the refrigerator. But I never put that much onion in because it is too
    much moisture. Yours probably held all that moisture and puffed up in a
    very small pan. Lots of times I will pull it out from the oven, put some
    cheese to melt and perhaps brown just a tiny bit, then put it back in for a
    minute. Or like you did, I will sprinkle parmesan on top.
    Frittata. I've no luck with quiche.
    Dee Dee
     
  4. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >
    > --
    > Andy


    Hi Andy,
    We make this in a larger fry pan just like you did and it comes out much
    thinner. We call ours frittata. We put anything in it we can conjure up
    from the refrigerator. But I never put that much onion in because it is too
    much moisture. Yours probably held all that moisture and puffed up in a
    very small pan. Lots of times I will pull it out from the oven, put some
    cheese to melt and perhaps brown just a tiny bit, then put it back in for a
    minute. Or like you did, I will sprinkle parmesan on top.
    Frittata. I've no luck with quiche.
    Dee Dee
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q>
    wrote:

    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.


    IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  6. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Andy" <q> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >>
    >> I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    >> orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    >> evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    >> 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >>
    >> I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    >> mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    >> filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    >> until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    >> oven for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    >> the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    >> more like quiche than a frittata.
    >>
    >> Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    >> I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >>
    >> In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    >> sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Andy

    >
    > Hi Andy,
    > We make this in a larger fry pan just like you did and it comes out much
    > thinner. We call ours frittata. We put anything in it we can conjure up
    > from the refrigerator. But I never put that much onion in because it is
    > too much moisture. Yours probably held all that moisture and puffed up in
    > a very small pan. Lots of times I will pull it out from the oven, put
    > some cheese to melt and perhaps brown just a tiny bit, then put it back in
    > for a minute. Or like you did, I will sprinkle parmesan on top.
    > Frittata. I've no luck with quiche.
    > Dee Dee


    I thought that quiche was another thing: like "quiche lorraine", for
    example!
    There is a base of short pastry or puff pastry and over a mix of egg ,
    cheese and cram!
    How do you do your quiche (possible new thread))
    Cheers
    Pandora
     
  7. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >>
    >> I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    >> orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    >> evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    >> 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >>
    >> I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    >> mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    >> filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    >> until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    >> oven for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    >> the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    >> more like quiche than a frittata.
    >>
    >> Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    >> I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >>
    >> In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    >> sprinkled with parmesan cheese.

    >
    > IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)


    For me too: No crust and no cream!
    pan
     
  8. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.


    It's neither a frittata or a quiche... a frittata is flipped and fried
    on both sides, a quiche is a baked egg custard pie, has to have a
    crust. What you made is known in culinary parlance as an abortion, but
    a good abortion.

    I think your abortion needed some browned diced potatoes, an
    Irish/Mick... add some ham and you'd have a Denver/Western... a
    Midwestern contains a bible. An Eastern contains lox. A Southern
    exchanges the eggs for grits and hog jowls... um, let's not go there...
    scrapple is an abortion gone bad. hehe

    With Spam it's a Hawiian

    Sheldon Uke
     
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)
    > --
    > Om.



    A quiche has a crust? :O Well I'll be!!!

    --
    Andy
    Crawling back under my rock
     
  10. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Andy" <q> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    >> IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)
    >> --
    >> Om.

    >
    >
    > A quiche has a crust? :O Well I'll be!!!


    It is just for this reason that I didn't understand!!!!
    cheers
    Pan
    >
    > --
    > Andy
    > Crawling back under my rock
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Andy" <q> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > >> IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)
    > >> --
    > >> Om.

    > >
    > >
    > > A quiche has a crust? :O Well I'll be!!!

    >
    > It is just for this reason that I didn't understand!!!!
    > cheers
    > Pan


    I always made them with a crust?

    Am I wrong? :-o
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For me too: No crust and no cream!


    That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe. If
    anyone wants to know what a great frittata tastes like and lives near
    a Trader Joe's, they have an absolutely killer precooked spinach and
    potato frittata for a sawbuck and change. It's about four servings
    which need only a 90 second nuke to knock your socks off. I'm getting
    another one today for (cough) research (cough) purposes. ;)

    nb
     
  13. King's Crown

    King's Crown Guest

    My experience with frittatas is that after cooking the ingredients I pour on
    just enough eggs to glue it all together. I don't stir the ingredients...
    just pour the eggs over the top. The eggs kind of sink into the ingredients
    in the pan. Put on a lid until egg is set. Sprinkle with some parmesan
    cheese and enjoy.

    Lynne

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >
    > --
    > Andy
     
  14. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >
    > --
    > Andy


    Can't be a quiche. By definition a quiche has a pastry crust, a fritada does
    not.

    Dimitri

    quiche
    [KEESH]
    This dish originated in northeastern France in the region of Alsace-Lorraine. It
    consists of a pastry shell filled with a savory custard made of eggs, cream,
    seasonings and various other ingredients such as onions, mushrooms, ham,
    shellfish or herbs. The most notable of these savory pies is the quiche
    Lorraine, which has crisp bacon bits (and sometimes GRUYÈRE cheese) added to the
    custard filling. Quiches can be served as a lunch or dinner entrée, or as a
    first course or HORS D'OEUVRE.
    © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S
    COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst
     
  15. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Andy" <q> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> IMHO a Frittata is just a quiche with no crust. :)
    >> >> --
    >> >> Om.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > A quiche has a crust? :O Well I'll be!!!

    >>
    >> It is just for this reason that I didn't understand!!!!
    >> cheers
    >> Pan

    >
    > I always made them with a crust?
    >
    > Am I wrong? :-o


    Oh! Noo! You are right! Quiche is with crust, but Andy said that his
    frittata was like a quiche, so I didn't understand :)
    Pandora
    > --
    > Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
    > Nicholson
     
  16. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> For me too: No crust and no cream!

    >
    > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe. If
    > anyone wants to know what a great frittata tastes like and lives near
    > a Trader Joe's, they have an absolutely killer precooked spinach and
    > potato frittata for a sawbuck and change. It's about four servings
    > which need only a 90 second nuke to knock your socks off. I'm getting
    > another one today for (cough) research (cough) purposes. ;)
    >
    > nb


    I like eggs and, generally, frittate! Do you know the recipe of this
    "killer" frittata with spinach and potatoes? Have you ever tried to
    reproduce it?
    Cheers
    Pandora
     
  17. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "King's Crown" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > My experience with frittatas is that after cooking the ingredients I pour
    > on just enough eggs to glue it all together. I don't stir the
    > ingredients... just pour the eggs over the top. The eggs kind of sink
    > into the ingredients in the pan. Put on a lid until egg is set. Sprinkle
    > with some parmesan cheese and enjoy.


    Yes I prefer too, the frying pan for my frittata. But if you have to make a
    12-15 eggs frittata, how do you do? You must put in the oven , unless you
    have a very very large frying pan.
    Pandora
    >
    > Lynne
    >
    > "Andy" <q> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >>
    >> I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    >> orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    >> evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    >> 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >>
    >> I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    >> mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    >> filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    >> until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    >> oven for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    >> the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    >> more like quiche than a frittata.
    >>
    >> Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    >> I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >>
    >> In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    >> sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Andy

    >
    >
     
  18. Lou

    Lou Guest

    On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 08:53:28 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've no luck with quiche.
    >Dee Dee
    >


    This one works well...

    Breakfast Quiche

    Ingredients:

    One 9-inch pie shell, unbaked
    1/2 cup real mayonnaise (light)
    2/3 cup milk
    3 eggs
    1 Tablespoon cornstarch
    1-1/2 cups shredded cheese (cheddar, jack, swiss etc.)
    1/2 cup browned Sausage or crumbled Bacon
    1/3 cup finely chopped onion
    1/8 teaspoon white pepper (I use Cayenne pepper)
    1/2 cup finely chopped mushrooms (optional)

    Mix all ingredients and pour into pie shell. Bake at 325 degrees
    for 40 to 45 minutes, or until center is firm. Let stand for 5 to 6
    minutes before cutting.

    You may use whatever combinations of cheeses and meat or
    seafood that appeal to you. My favorite is Pepper Jack Cheese
    and Mexican Chorizo Sausage. Smoked Salmon with Sharp
    Cheddar Cheese also makes a good Quiche if you like seafood.

    You have to mind the volumes if you add ingredients as the above
    pretty much fills the pie shell. I would recommend a deep shell if
    you want to add additional items.

    I seldom make this the same way twice!
     
  19. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    Mmmmmmmmm! Good recipe I must to try!
    Cheers
    Pandora
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "Lou" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 08:53:28 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I've no luck with quiche.
    >>Dee Dee
    >>

    >
    > This one works well...
    >
    > Breakfast Quiche
    >
    > Ingredients:
    >
    > One 9-inch pie shell, unbaked
    > 1/2 cup real mayonnaise (light)
    > 2/3 cup milk
    > 3 eggs
    > 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
    > 1-1/2 cups shredded cheese (cheddar, jack, swiss etc.)
    > 1/2 cup browned Sausage or crumbled Bacon
    > 1/3 cup finely chopped onion
    > 1/8 teaspoon white pepper (I use Cayenne pepper)
    > 1/2 cup finely chopped mushrooms (optional)
    >
    > Mix all ingredients and pour into pie shell. Bake at 325 degrees
    > for 40 to 45 minutes, or until center is firm. Let stand for 5 to 6
    > minutes before cutting.
    >
    > You may use whatever combinations of cheeses and meat or
    > seafood that appeal to you. My favorite is Pepper Jack Cheese
    > and Mexican Chorizo Sausage. Smoked Salmon with Sharp
    > Cheddar Cheese also makes a good Quiche if you like seafood.
    >
    > You have to mind the volumes if you add ingredients as the above
    > pretty much fills the pie shell. I would recommend a deep shell if
    > you want to add additional items.
    >
    > I seldom make this the same way twice!
     
  20. sueb

    sueb Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >
    > I small diced one large red onion, one medium yellow and one medium
    > orange bell pepper and cooked it with two pinches of course salt in a
    > evoo oiled large cast iron pan over medium-high heat until soft and added
    > 2 cloves minced garlic at the end for about a minute.
    >
    > I mixed 7 eggs (musgovian) and 1/4 cup whole milk. I transferred the veg
    > mix to a 6" cast iron pan and added the eggs and stirred it all up (it
    > filled up almost to the top of the pan) and cooked it on medium heat
    > until some of the egg started to set, then transferred it to a 325 F.
    > oven for 15 minutes.
    >
    > It rose a little as it cooked and looked and smelled great. I sat it on
    > the stove and let it cool a little bit. When I sliced a piece it looked
    > more like quiche than a frittata.
    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >


    I think what you've got there is a combination of a strata (eggs + milk
    + other things baked in the oven) and a "spanish tortilla" (eggs + milk
    + other things) cooked on the stove like an omelette.

    A quiche has a pie crust.

    A spanish tortilla often includes potatoes, but doesn't have to.

    Susan B.
     
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