Is my frittata a quiche??

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy, Nov 30, 2005.

  1. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > For me too: No crust and no cream!

    >
    > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.


    Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.

    A frittata is actually a dago's lousy cheapo version of a kugel... see
    how there is no such thing as dago cookery, it's all stolen but the
    cheapo rendition.... a fritatta is something dagos make from what the
    french dump in the garbage.

    Sheldon Cannelone
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > notbob wrote:
    > > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > For me too: No crust and no cream!

    > >
    > > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.

    >
    > Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    > essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    > guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    > a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.


    Sorta kinda...
    To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    sandwich with the egg as the "bread".

    I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    omelet is made in an omelett pan.

    For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    of the egg over that.

    With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.

    A quiche goes into a crust and is baked.


    >
    > A frittata is actually a dago's lousy cheapo version of a kugel... see
    > how there is no such thing as dago cookery, it's all stolen but the
    > cheapo rendition.... a fritatta is something dagos make from what the
    > french dump in the garbage.


    Don't be a jerk. ;-)

    Frittata is "lazier" than making a real omelet if you are using a
    skillet, but it's still good!

    Howsabout some of that snausage of yours in that Omelet Shel' baby???

    ;-)

    >
    > Sheldon Cannelone


    Om Omelet...
    >

    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  3. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> notbob wrote:
    >> > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > For me too: No crust and no cream!
    >> >
    >> > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    >> > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.

    >>
    >> Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    >> essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    >> guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    >> a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.

    >
    > Sorta kinda...
    > To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    > is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    > sandwich with the egg as the "bread".
    >
    > I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    > omelet is made in an omelett pan.
    >
    > For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    > of the egg over that.
    >
    > With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    > in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    > up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.
    >
    > A quiche goes into a crust and is baked.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> A frittata is actually a dago's lousy cheapo version of a kugel... see
    >> how there is no such thing as dago cookery, it's all stolen but the
    >> cheapo rendition.... a fritatta is something dagos make from what the
    >> french dump in the garbage.

    >
    > Don't be a jerk. ;-)
    >
    > Frittata is "lazier" than making a real omelet if you are using a
    > skillet, but it's still good!
    >
    > Howsabout some of that snausage of yours in that Omelet Shel' baby???
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    >>
    >> Sheldon Cannelone

    >
    > Om Omelet...
    >>

    > --
    > Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
    > Nicholson


    I know that is Shellacked who speaks because I read the word "Dago". He
    alone, use it :DDDDD
    Pandora
     
  4. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I forgot to ask you, Bob: "What ingredient is "eeoo"?


    LOL!.... It's my screw up!

    It should have been "evoo", RRay's vehemently trashed acronym for
    extra virgin olive oil.

    nb
     
  5. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > This morning I decided to make a frittata.
    >


    >
    > Should I have done a courser dice or cooked it in a wider pan? Or should
    > I just call it a quiche and shut-up about it? ;)
    >
    > In either case, it sure was yummy, served on open face english muffins,
    > sprinkled with parmesan cheese.
    >


    If it tastes good, it doesn't matter what you call it.
    On second thought, just don't call it a martini....

    ;-)

    glroia p
     
  6. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I forgot to ask you, Bob: "What ingredient is "eeoo"?

    >
    > LOL!.... It's my screw up!
    >
    > It should have been "evoo", RRay's vehemently trashed acronym for
    > extra virgin olive oil.
    >
    > nb


    O yes :) I know Evoo (we call Evo)
    Pan
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > In article <1133376749.443521.229450[email protected]>,
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > notbob wrote:
    > > > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > For me too: No crust and no cream!
    > > >
    > > > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > > > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.

    > >
    > > Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    > > essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    > > guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    > > a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.

    >
    > Sorta kinda...
    > To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    > is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    > sandwich with the egg as the "bread".


    Yes, in the strictest sense the french omelet, but the french have no
    particular hold on egg cookery... a Denver type concoction is an omelet
    as well.

    > I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    > omelet is made in an omelett pan.


    A fritatta is fried, not steamed... lose the cover.

    > For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    > of the egg over that.


    Again, froggy eggy.

    > With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    > in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    > up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.


    A fritatta is flipped to fry the other side... again, lose that cover,
    unless you're going to use the lid to aid in flipping, but a fritatta
    is cooked UNcovered. Some do fritattas in the oven but I think that's
    cheating, and the texture is different too... baked eggs is not fried
    eggs.

    Sheldon
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Puester wrote:

    >
    >
    > If it tastes good, it doesn't matter what you call it.
    > On second thought, just don't call it a martini....
    >


    Why not? People are calling all sorts of concoctions martinis :)
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > notbob wrote:
    > > > > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > For me too: No crust and no cream!
    > > > >
    > > > > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > > > > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.
    > > >
    > > > Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    > > > essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    > > > guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    > > > a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.

    > >
    > > Sorta kinda...
    > > To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    > > is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    > > sandwich with the egg as the "bread".

    >
    > Yes, in the strictest sense the french omelet, but the french have no
    > particular hold on egg cookery... a Denver type concoction is an omelet
    > as well.
    >
    > > I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    > > omelet is made in an omelett pan.

    >
    > A fritatta is fried, not steamed... lose the cover.
    >
    > > For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    > > of the egg over that.

    >
    > Again, froggy eggy.
    >
    > > With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    > > in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    > > up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.

    >
    > A fritatta is flipped to fry the other side... again, lose that cover,
    > unless you're going to use the lid to aid in flipping, but a fritatta
    > is cooked UNcovered. Some do fritattas in the oven but I think that's
    > cheating, and the texture is different too... baked eggs is not fried
    > eggs.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Agreed.

    I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > notbob wrote:
    > > > > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > For me too: No crust and no cream!
    > > > >
    > > > > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > > > > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.
    > > >
    > > > Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    > > > essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    > > > guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    > > > a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.

    > >
    > > Sorta kinda...
    > > To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    > > is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    > > sandwich with the egg as the "bread".

    >
    > Yes, in the strictest sense the french omelet, but the french have no
    > particular hold on egg cookery... a Denver type concoction is an omelet
    > as well.
    >
    > > I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    > > omelet is made in an omelett pan.

    >
    > A fritatta is fried, not steamed... lose the cover.
    >
    > > For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    > > of the egg over that.

    >
    > Again, froggy eggy.
    >
    > > With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    > > in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    > > up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.

    >
    > A fritatta is flipped to fry the other side... again, lose that cover,
    > unless you're going to use the lid to aid in flipping, but a fritatta
    > is cooked UNcovered. Some do fritattas in the oven but I think that's
    > cheating, and the texture is different too... baked eggs is not fried
    > eggs.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Agreed.

    I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > notbob wrote:
    > > > > > On 2005-11-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > > For me too: No crust and no cream!
    > > > > >
    > > > > > That's my understanding, too. Crustless and creamless. I've got
    > > > > > quiches down, but am working on a foolproof frittata recipe.
    > > > >
    > > > > Actually a frittata is not a crustless quiche.... a frittata is
    > > > > essentially an omelet made with scraps that is fried on both sides, I
    > > > > guess an attempt at hiding the fact that it's made with table scraps...
    > > > > a quiche is a pie filled with a composed egg custard.
    > > >
    > > > Sorta kinda...
    > > > To me, a Frittata has the goodies mixed in with the egg while an Omelet
    > > > is _layered_. The eggs are separate from the goodies, kinda like an egg
    > > > sandwich with the egg as the "bread".

    > >
    > > Yes, in the strictest sense the french omelet, but the french have no
    > > particular hold on egg cookery... a Denver type concoction is an omelet
    > > as well.
    > >
    > > > I generally make Frittata in a covered cast iron skillet, while an
    > > > omelet is made in an omelett pan.

    > >
    > > A fritatta is fried, not steamed... lose the cover.
    > >
    > > > For an Omelet, I cook the egg first, add the filling then fold the top
    > > > of the egg over that.

    > >
    > > Again, froggy eggy.
    > >
    > > > With a Frittata, I mix everything together in a bowl, stir that gently
    > > > in the skillet in butter and olive oil then cover it to finish "setting
    > > > up" after sprinkling the top with additional cheese to melt.

    > >
    > > A fritatta is flipped to fry the other side... again, lose that cover,
    > > unless you're going to use the lid to aid in flipping, but a fritatta
    > > is cooked UNcovered. Some do fritattas in the oven but I think that's
    > > cheating, and the texture is different too... baked eggs is not fried
    > > eggs.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > Agreed.
    >
    > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P


    With fritatta the ratio of egg to solids is fairly low, should be just
    enough egg to hold it all together... it's pretty difficult to over
    cook a fritatta, not unless you burn it.

    Egg Foo Yung is an omelet too.

    Sheldon
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,

    >
    > > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P

    >
    > With fritatta the ratio of egg to solids is fairly low, should be just
    > enough egg to hold it all together... it's pretty difficult to over
    > cook a fritatta, not unless you burn it.
    >
    > Egg Foo Yung is an omelet too.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    And I have yet to have Egg Foo Yung that I liked. :-(
    Most of the time it's like trying to eat egg flavored rubber.
    WAY way way overcooked. Of course it was at a buffet, but still. Ick!

    I prefer my eggs slightly soft and under-done.

    I know what you mean about a proper frittata tho'.
    It's mostly "stuff" with just enough egg to glue it all together.
    I frequently make "leftovers" frittata. :)
    It generally turns out very good.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  13. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > > In article <[email protected]>,

    > >
    > > > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > > > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > > > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > > > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P

    > >
    > > With fritatta the ratio of egg to solids is fairly low, should be just
    > > enough egg to hold it all together... it's pretty difficult to over
    > > cook a fritatta, not unless you burn it.
    > >
    > > Egg Foo Yung is an omelet too.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > And I have yet to have Egg Foo Yung that I liked. :-(
    > Most of the time it's like trying to eat egg flavored rubber.
    > WAY way way overcooked. Of course it was at a buffet, but still. Ick!
    >
    > I prefer my eggs slightly soft and under-done.
    >
    > I know what you mean about a proper frittata tho'.
    > It's mostly "stuff" with just enough egg to glue it all together.
    > I frequently make "leftovers" frittata. :)
    > It generally turns out very good.
    > --
    > Om.


    In Hawaii Egg Foo Yung was definitely an omelette over shredded cabbage and
    stuffed with shrimp or whatever meat you wanted in it. No bean sprouts.
    I've made them before, but I when I did (no longer have the recipe, sorry!)
    I dropped plops of egg, bean sprouts, shrimp, chives into a skillet and
    fried them up. Tasted just like the American restaurant kind.

    kili
     
  14. aem

    aem Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    > --

    If your pan has an oven/fireproof handle you can put it under the
    broiler instead of flipping it. -aem
     
  15. aem

    aem Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    > --

    If your pan has an oven/fireproof handle you can put it under the
    broiler instead of flipping it. -aem
     
  16. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    aem wrote:
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    > > --

    > If your pan has an oven/fireproof handle you can put it under the
    > broiler instead of flipping it.


    Yeah, you can, you can do lots of things... but broiling does not
    impart the correct texture any more than baking does... a fritatta is
    *fried*, on both sides. Calling it a fritatta when baked/broiled is
    like calling vodka in a stemed glass a martini, it ain't... no way, no
    how. There's only one correct way to make a martini, and only one
    correct way to make a fritatta... technique can be refined and/or
    modulated but there is but one acceptible method.

    Why don't you poach your fritatta while you're at it.... may as well
    serve beer with an olive in a stemed glass.

    Sheldon Boodles Rossi

    Sheldon
     
  17. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-12-02, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:


    > .........a fritatta is
    > *fried*, on both sides.


    He knows this from all his guinea/dago/wop friends.

    > Sheldon Boodles Rossi


    What can I say? His martinis are impeccable!

    notvodka
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    > > --

    > If your pan has an oven/fireproof handle you can put it under the
    > broiler instead of flipping it. -aem
    >


    I use a cast iron skillet. ;-)
    Should not be a problem!

    Thanks!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > aem wrote:
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I'll give that a shot next time, thanks!
    > > > I've never tried flipping it as a whole.
    > > > I have a dread of over-cooking eggs.
    > > > It makes them rubbery and nasty. ;-P
    > > > --

    > > If your pan has an oven/fireproof handle you can put it under the
    > > broiler instead of flipping it.

    >
    > Yeah, you can, you can do lots of things... but broiling does not
    > impart the correct texture any more than baking does... a fritatta is
    > *fried*, on both sides. Calling it a fritatta when baked/broiled is
    > like calling vodka in a stemed glass a martini, it ain't... no way, no
    > how. There's only one correct way to make a martini, and only one
    > correct way to make a fritatta... technique can be refined and/or
    > modulated but there is but one acceptible method.
    >
    > Why don't you poach your fritatta while you're at it.... may as well
    > serve beer with an olive in a stemed glass.
    >
    > Sheldon Boodles Rossi
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Beer goes with a squeeze of lemon, not olives....... ;-)

    But you can still drink beer from a martini glass
    if you want to. <lol>
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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