Is Scandium right for me?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John P. Wilkin, Mar 9, 2003.

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  1. I'm really looking for general (not specifically scandium advice), so please feel free to offer
    generally.

    I'm relatively light (155lbs) and tall (6ft), have raced extensively including cyclocross in Europe
    20 years ago, and now ride only recreationally, but hard. Probably because of my weight and style of
    riding (good climber, miserable sprinter), I've never owned a bike that was too spongy or yielding.
    The last bike I raced (19 years ago), for example, was a Vitus, and it was stiff enough for me. I
    think I'm really more interested in "light" than "stiff". Advice? Thanks!
     
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  2. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (John P.
    Wilkin) wrote:

    > I'm really looking for general (not specifically scandium advice), so please feel free to offer
    > generally.
    >
    > I'm relatively light (155lbs) and tall (6ft), have raced extensively including cyclocross in
    > Europe 20 years ago, and now ride only recreationally, but hard. Probably because of my weight and
    > style of riding (good climber, miserable sprinter), I've never owned a bike that was too spongy or
    > yielding. The last bike I raced (19 years ago), for example, was a Vitus, and it was stiff enough
    > for me. I think I'm really more interested in "light" than "stiff". Advice?

    Well, from the American perspective, Vitus frames were considered the ne plus ultra of flexibility-
    in short, we thought they were noodles. If you found those stiff enough, then you can ride any frame
    you want and you'll be fine. :)

    Personally, I have always ridden steel and prefer it for its repairability and relatively less
    destructive impact on the environemnt in production (although the environmental costs are,
    obviously, very high). Now, many people think a pound of steel weighs more than a pound of
    unobtanium, but I am not one of those.

    I would think you could be quite happy with any aluminum, titanium or carbon fiber frame if you are
    really looking to emphasize the "light" part of the equation. There are some trade-offs in
    repairability which may or may not weigh on your mind. There's lots of sub-18 lbs bikes you could
    choose from- and much lighter depending on how much you want to spend.

    --
    "Of course the people don't want war...that is understood. But voice or no voice, the people can
    always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That's easy. All you have to do is tell them they
    are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and for exposing the country
    to danger. It works the same in any country."

    Hermann Goering, 1939
     
  3. John-<< I'm really looking for general (not specifically scandium advice), so please feel free to
    offer generally.

    << I'm relatively light (155lbs)

    << I think I'm really more interested in "light" than "stiff". Advice?

    Lightness in a frameset is vastly overblown these days but look at Calfee- great framesets, well
    made, ride like a dream-

    http://www.calfeedesign.com

    remember 'scandium'(scamdium) is just an additive to aluminum. can make it lighter but not
    necessarily more durable. If made well, an aluminum frameset can be durable.-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm really looking for general (not specifically scandium advice), so please feel free to offer
    >generally.
    >
    >I'm relatively light (155lbs) and tall (6ft), have raced extensively including cyclocross in Europe
    >20 years ago, and now ride only recreationally, but hard. Probably because of my weight and style
    >of riding (good climber, miserable sprinter), I've never owned a bike that was too spongy or
    >yielding. The last bike I raced (19 years ago), for example, was a Vitus, and it was stiff enough
    >for me. I think I'm really more interested in "light" than "stiff". Advice?

    Find a bike that fits from a reputable manufacturer. The material is really not important as along
    as it is used properly, that is where the reputable manufaturer comes in.
    ------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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