Is Single Speed Good For Commute And Long Distance?

Discussion in 'Singlespeed' started by Keyan, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    These days single speeds seem to be more popular for kids or for people that do tricks on bikes. Having a multi-speed just makes life easier on longer rides or varied terrain.
     


  2. DawnStewart

    DawnStewart New Member

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    Hello there! Thanks for sharing this information with us! I am pretty sure that it'll be useful for me in the future.
     
  3. JB Fernandez

    JB Fernandez Member

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    That's not the question brother. Single Speed Bike are tough and durable. It can endure any road conditions, and also has a remarkable speed depends on how many teeth your sprocket has. The real question is can your body last long on a long distance ride. Other factors is road condition and weather condition. But if there's no other option for you to save some cash, just deal with your current situation. And just find alternative routes that can shorten your travel time.
     
  4. Kakashi

    Kakashi Active Member

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    Well you could try and probably after trying you'll get the idea to buy another bike. You won't last doing long distances and upward slopes.
     
  5. JB Fernandez

    JB Fernandez Member

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    Single speed is ideal for tricks compared to multi-speed. That is why it is very popular on kids. While adults prefer having a multi-speed bike because they love to ride on a long distance basis.
     
  6. Robert Aboone

    Robert Aboone New Member

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    Recently I just moved to an area where daily bike commuting has become my Regular workout, so I'm only just getting back into riding a bike.

    If your commute is within a rural area you may struggle having only one gear. Over longer distances you may tire more quickly if the gradient is not flat.

    A road bike hardly recommended for long distance commute, but that costs money. Where fixies found very cheap in both cost and maintenance.

    I use Critical Harpar more than a common single speed performing bike, standard for commuters and road riders.

    The low maintenance cost and with parts on a fixie actually makes a rider satisfied.
    hope you find it helpful and appropriate.
     
  7. reighn

    reighn Member

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    I think it's all depends on the roads, if the road is just flat, it's alright to use singe speed bike, all you have to worry your stamina and strength, if how you going to maintain it while riding.
     
  8. Pion

    Pion New Member

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    I moved from gears to singlespeed about 10 years ago.
    End 2015 I moved from singlespeed to fixie.
    Why? Because I was fed up by the narrow chains, thin sprockets, that weren't able to last 3 months without starting to skip and bicycle stores that let me wait over half a year for repair, so that my spare bicycle ran into trouble before repair was finished.
    Those problems ceased with singlespeed.
    The only thing left I was plagued with was the freewheel, badly sealed, causing water to intrude, in winter frost and in summer heavy rain the grease became sticky with same result.
    The move gears to singlespeed went as easy as the move singlespeed to fixie. Never back. End of a couple decades returning / lasting problems and misery due to failures.

    By all means: don't stay with a 3/32" drivetrain, move to 1/8".
    It's really night and day wear difference.
    I stayed with 3/32" the first 5-6 years, and it wore 3 chains and 1 chainring yearly. Since 2015's singlespeed>fixie (and 1/8"), I never had to replace a 1/8" chainring (alu 7075T6).
    Only chains, and since end last year I started to use a version with double as thick link plates. That single chain now lasts 7 months and the chain length increase under tension sits now abit over halfway.

    Some benefits of fixed gear riding:
    - in winter it's much easier to stay up, both legs have support at any time
    - you can save on brakes by steadily pushing against the forward movement.
    - much better control / maneuverability
    - the sole drivetrain limit is the frame clearance.

    My daily average km is about 60-70 km.
    My fixie has 62 mm tires, a 48/16 gear ratio, and my bicycles no-luggage weight (ie default weight, things I always have with me) is about 30 kg. Double big bags, a basket above them, 2 backpacks and a mountain style backpack. Tools, spare tire, spare chain (chain is the Gusset model "Tank", weights > 500 gram), and 4 small bags with cords and binders.
    The biggest load I so far had, was 55 kg luggage (most parts of 4 clothes racks of 18 kg each), with 25 km to go.

    The sole drawback is uphill/front wind. That's pushing at too low speed to be efficient. But that's just a fraction of the cycling time.
     
  9. mitan143

    mitan143 New Member

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    Yes, it easier to commute on single speed and it depends on the landscape you're trailing at but I think you won't last long for long distances unless it is a motorbike. But cycling takes a lot of energy and if you keep on cycling for hours then your body will surely become tired. You need to take a rest for that to continue on your journey going to your destination place.
     
  10. Krishna Kumar

    Krishna Kumar New Member

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    I think maintaining a low(like in between) speed will help you to cover more distance
     
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