Is the bicycle a static electricity generator?



K

Ken C. M.

Guest
I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this is
true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged, and
comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going to
stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is the
number one spot."

Now I don't claim to know much about static electricity, so does anyone
out there know if this is true? If it is, would grounding the bicycle
help in the reduction of grime collecting on the chain?

Ken
--
You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
 
L

Leo Lichtman

Guest
"Ken C. M." wrote: (clip)does anyone out there know if this is true?(clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Bunk.
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Ken C. M. wrote:
:: I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this
:: is true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
:: grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
:: bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
:: electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged,
:: and comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going
:: to stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is
:: the number one spot."
::
:: Now I don't claim to know much about static electricity, so does
:: anyone out there know if this is true? If it is, would grounding the
:: bicycle help in the reduction of grime collecting on the chain?

Have you ever been zapped after getting off your bike? Do things that
'stick' do so only because one thing is positively charged and another thing
isn't?
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 13:32:01 -0500, Ken C. M. wrote:

> I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this is
> true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
> grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
> bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
> electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged, and
> comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going to
> stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is the
> number one spot."


That explains the dust storms which always follow me around
when I ride.

--
Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
Roger Zoul wrote:
> Ken C. M. wrote:
> :: I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this
> :: is true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
> :: grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
> :: bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
> :: electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged,
> :: and comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going
> :: to stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is
> :: the number one spot."
> ::
> :: Now I don't claim to know much about static electricity, so does
> :: anyone out there know if this is true? If it is, would grounding the
> :: bicycle help in the reduction of grime collecting on the chain?
>
> Have you ever been zapped after getting off your bike? Do things that
> 'stick' do so only because one thing is positively charged and another thing
> isn't?
>
>

I can't recall ever being shocked getting off the bike. So I guess this
myth is busted.

Ken
--
You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
Michael Warner wrote:
> On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 13:32:01 -0500, Ken C. M. wrote:
>
>
>>I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this is
>>true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
>>grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
>>bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
>>electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged, and
>>comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going to
>>stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is the
>>number one spot."

>
>
> That explains the dust storms which always follow me around
> when I ride.
>

Oh I thought that was caused by the low pressure area that exists behind
the rider.

Ken
--
You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Michael Warner wrote:
> On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 13:32:01 -0500, Ken C. M. wrote:
>
>
>>I found this quote on a lubricant website and was wondering if this is
>>true or not: "The bicycle, because it's on rubber tires, is not
>>grounded, making the bicycle a static electricity machine. As the
>>bicycle rolls along, it's constantly throwing off negative charged
>>electrons, whereas the dirt along the ground is positively charged, and
>>comes up to the bike to replace the discharge. The dirt is going to
>>stick to whatever is sticky on the bike; of course the chain is the
>>number one spot."

>
>
> That explains the dust storms which always follow me around
> when I ride.
>

What static? I have ridden for miles and come to rest by putting my hand
on a steel fence post of chain link and have never had even a slight
tingle. Scratch one myth. Just don't try it with an electric cattle fence.
Bill
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Ken C. M." <[email protected]> writes:

> If it is, would grounding the bicycle
> help in the reduction of grime collecting on the chain?


Jenkinson's Law applies.


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Tom Keats wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Ken C. M." <[email protected]> writes:
>
>
>>If it is, would grounding the bicycle
>>help in the reduction of grime collecting on the chain?

>
>
> Jenkinson's Law applies.
>
>
> cheers,
> Tom
>

Talk about going to extremes. No, it would not help since there is no
real static buildup.
Bill