Is there a "better" tread for degraded road surfaces?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by MotownBikeBoy, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. MotownBikeBoy

    MotownBikeBoy Active Member

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    Our roads are a real mess, mostly asphalt, some concrete. Because of Michigan's political and economic situation over the past decades, I would say about 80% of our roads are due for replacing. When I do find a good surface of smooth asphalt or concrete, I pick up a couple of MPH. Right now, I'm running on the stock tires, which are these, slick tread essentially: http://m.specialized.com/us/en/ftb/road-tires/competitive-road-tires/sworks-turbo So, is there a better tread for poor surfaces?
     
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  2. baker3

    baker3 New Member

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    Nope, just run a good set of 25mm tires and you'll be alright.
     
  3. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Were these stock on the Roubaix?

    If so, the bike is designed for such surfaces as the ones you are describing. Such as:

    I havent tried the S-Works Turbo, but I tried their very simple Espoir, with the wire.

    I tried two sets, one in 28mm for the commuter and one that was stock with the Allez.

    I was using both in some very bad surfaces with no problems. Had a total of 4 flats in 3000km with the 25's and that was due to the valve stem of the tubes breaking except once where I dont know what caused it, but I suspect either some very sharp glass or the tube again.


    Btw are you using Tubulars or Clinchers?

    You could check these types of tires:

    1. Pave specific tires, (like the Conti 4 season, or the Vittoria Pave)
    2. Or if you have some really bad roads maybe a Cyclocross tire...

    But if you are not worried about accidents and need a tire with better traction or something, you could just wear these ones first before getting new ones. Chances are that you are gonna be bored with them before they actually break, which is what happened with the Espoir 25's I had. (3000km, last few were not so "carefully riden", and just a few small cuts, but pretty good).

    Cobblestones and bad concrete are not that bad.

    Wet grates, wet railroad lines, oil slicks and mud in the start of rain are! (Very, very bad actually. Not so much for the tires but they can cause accidents due to loss of traction).


    Good luck! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    The only tire advice I'll offer is to use a heavier tire with thicker tread on crap roads. The tread pattern, itself, is not going to matter much. The use of more rubber over a heavy carcass is for a better shot at surviving the chuckholes, potholes, sinkholes and the metric shit-ton of gravel, road grit and those damned fist-size (and larger) chunks of asphalt that get kicked out of the holes.

    This winter absolutely killed our roads. From thin-skinned county chip & seal to paved state highways to concrete interstates...the road repair crews have their work cut out for them this year.
     
  5. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    AASHTA:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html

    Scroll down to "Tread for on-road use".

    But, like CampyBob said, an off-road tire may be more appropriate if you're riding over nothing but potholes, protecting the rim, the frame and your teeth.
     
  6. MotownBikeBoy

    MotownBikeBoy Active Member

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    Thanks guys, all good advice.
     
  7. JSWin

    JSWin Member

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    Tires for a mountain bike probably would be best for crappy pavement. Its not going to be too terribly smooth with touring tires. Political and economic issues maybe just about everywhere accept the republican states I would imagine.
     
  8. pinkride

    pinkride New Member

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    If the road is as bad as you describe it, then use some heavier tires, but it won't make such a big difference considering the road condition, unless you use a mountain bike or just use similar tires of a mountain bike.
     
  9. Damien Lee

    Damien Lee Active Member

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    If you're living in a place with bad roads, then you should only be riding with a mountain bike or BMX. Thick tires are able to withstand crappy roads but there are no guarantees. Personally, there's nothing that I hate more than potholes. We used to have a lot of those in the past, and it was a time I would only ride my mountain bike.
     
  10. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    Main roads in Metro Manila are usually paved although there are exceptions particularly during the rainy season. But with the secondary roads, eroded asphalt is the standard and more than half of the roads are dirt road. That's why we are not choosy with the wheels and tires not only of bikes but also of vehicles because the roads here is a mix of concrete, asphalt, dirt, and indescribable pathways.
     
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