Is there a tool available to do this job?



S

Steve W

Guest
Quote from SB web site:

"Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a threaded
lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette hubs"

I need the tool to undo the lockring

SW
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 22:06:07 +0000 (UTC), "Steve W"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>No, that's to remove the whole unit.
>I want to get the cogs off of it by undoing the slim lock ring with 8 semi
>circular cut
>outs in the outside of it.


There is no such tool. The lock rings are designed to be put in by the
factory and never taken off again -- there are no spares for sale for them
anyway. Put the freewheel in a vise and use a hammer and punch if you
really want to.

Jasper
 
Steve W wrote:
> No, that's to remove the whole unit.
> I want to get the cogs off of it by undoing the slim lock ring with 8 semi
> circular cut
> outs in the outside of it.
>
> SW
>
> "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >

> http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=&brand=&sku=15346&s
> toretype=&estoreid=&pagename=
> >
> > believe that's what you're looking for
> >


Maybe a hook spanner would work?
http://images.google.com/images?sou...LD:2005-08,GGLD:en&q=hook spanner&sa=N&tab=wi
 
Steve W wrote:
> "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=&brand=&sku=15346&s
>> toretype=&estoreid=&pagename=


> No, that's to remove the whole unit.
> I want to get the cogs off of it by undoing the slim lock ring with 8 semi
> circular cut
> outs in the outside of it.


Something from this page should work:

http://www.hammersource.com/Sledge_Hammers.html

Spend $20 on a sledge hammer and $25 on a new HG freewheel
(or the equivalent in pounds if you're in the UK) and your problems
will be solved. You'll feel a lot better too, catharsis is good.
Even if you do get the cogs off, what are you going to do with
them? Other cogs that fit the body are likely unavailable.

If you really need to play mix and match, try to find someone
unloading a 7-speed Uniglide freewheel and cogs.
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
Steve W wrote:
> Quote from SB web site:
> "Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a threaded
> lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette hubs"
> I need the tool to undo the lockring


Ubiquitous, and so cheap, at any LBS or email us

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
S

Steve W

Guest
The reason I want to do this is so that I can make a Mega Range more
progressive and would therefore like to get the 28t off of an old hyperglide
freewheel and fit it to the the Mega range.

Quote " Ubiquitous, and so cheap, at any LBS or email us" cryptic it may be
but I do not understand!! Please explain.

SW



> Steve W wrote:
> > Quote from SB web site:
> > "Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a

threaded
> > lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette hubs"
> > I need the tool to undo the lockring

>
> Ubiquitous, and so cheap, at any LBS or email us
>
> --
> Andrew Muzi
> www.yellowjersey.org
> Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 21:46:41 +0000, Steve W wrote:

> Quote from SB web site:
>
> "Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a
> threaded lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette
> hubs"
>
> I need the tool to undo the lockring


In a pinch you may have success with large Vise-Grips, clamped
to the outer edge of the lockring. Try holding the cogs by wrapping them
with a rag.

You can get the regular spline tool at most bike shops.

But better than that is a portable one, like the old Pamir Hypercracker:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/stein-mini-lock/

Let me explain why. First, sometimes you can just wrap the cogs
with a rag, but if the lockring is tight you may need a chainwhip.
Second, if the lockring is really tight, it's easy to strip the splines --
especially if you're using the other hand to hold the cogs.

A Hypercracker-type tool solves both these problems. It uses your bike's
chain so it eliminates the need for a chainwhip. Since it's sandwiched
between the lockring and the frame it cannot slip or strip. It takes an
extra step (putting the wheel back in the frame), but it's practically
idiot-proof. Therefore I believe it's a better choice for a home
mechanic. Plus it takes very little space in your toolkit.

If you're lucky, you might find an original Hypercracker for a few bucks.
This is one tool I refuse to lend!

Finally, there's no reason for the lockring to be super-tight. Don't
tighten it too much, and it will be much easier to remove the next time.

Matt O.
 
S

Sheldon Brown

Guest
Matt O'Toole wrote:

> On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 21:46:41 +0000, Steve W wrote:
>
>
>>Quote from SB web site:
>>
>>"Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a
>>threaded lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette
>>hubs"
>>
>>I need the tool to undo the lockring

>
>
> In a pinch you may have success with large Vise-Grips, clamped
> to the outer edge of the lockring. Try holding the cogs by wrapping them
> with a rag.
>
> You can get the regular spline tool at most bike shops.
>
> But better than that is a portable one, like the old Pamir Hypercracker:
>
> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/stein-mini-lock/
>
> Let me explain why. First, sometimes you can just wrap the cogs
> with a rag, but if the lockring is tight you may need a chainwhip.
> Second, if the lockring is really tight, it's easy to strip the splines --
> especially if you're using the other hand to hold the cogs.
>

If the freewheel has been removed from the hub, and you don't own a
freewheel vise, a good substitute is to wrap a length of old chain
around the largest sprocket, then clamp the two ends of the chain
together in the jaws of a normal vise.

> A Hypercracker-type tool solves both these problems. It uses your bike's
> chain so it eliminates the need for a chainwhip. Since it's sandwiched
> between the lockring and the frame it cannot slip or strip. It takes an
> extra step (putting the wheel back in the frame), but it's practically
> idiot-proof. Therefore I believe it's a better choice for a home
> mechanic. Plus it takes very little space in your toolkit.
>
> If you're lucky, you might find an original Hypercracker for a few bucks.
> This is one tool I refuse to lend!


A Hypercracker won't work for this, the lockrings on the FREEWHEELS are
a different diameter, and have the splines on the outside.
Hypercrackers work for cassettes, not freewheels.

I only once ever had occasion to take one of these apart, and I did it
with a hammer and punch.

> Finally, there's no reason for the lockring to be super-tight. Don't
> tighten it too much, and it will be much easier to remove the next time.


That's true.

Sheldon "Freewheel, Not Cassette" Brown
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| If only God would give me some clear sign! |
| Like making a large deposit in my name at a Swiss bank. |
| --Woody Allen |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
 
B

Benjamin Lewis

Guest
Steve W. wrote:

>
> The reason I want to do this is so that I can make a Mega Range more
> progressive and would therefore like to get the 28t off of an old
> hyperglide freewheel and fit it to the the Mega range.
>
> Quote
> " Ubiquitous,


The removal tool may be found all over the place,

> and so cheap,


it doesn't cost very much,

> at any LBS


it can be found at any Local Bike Shop

> or email us


or if you want to acquire one from my shop, send me a note.

> " cryptic it may
> be but I do not understand!! Please explain.


How's that? :)

--
Benjamin Lewis

Now is the time for all good men to come to.
-- Walt Kelly
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
>>Steve W wrote:
>>>Quote from SB web site:
>>>"Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a

> threaded
>>>lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette hubs"
>>>I need the tool to undo the lockring


<[email protected]>:
>>Ubiquitous, and so cheap, at any LBS or email us


Steve W wrote:
> The reason I want to do this is so that I can make a Mega Range more
> progressive and would therefore like to get the 28t off of an old hyperglide
> freewheel and fit it to the the Mega range.
> Quote " Ubiquitous, and so cheap, at any LBS or email us" cryptic it may be
> but I do not understand!! Please explain.


Sorry to be overly brief and terse.

That modern freehweel lockring is just a lockring. Ride over
to your LBS and ask for a lockring tool. You should expect
something under $20 at any reasonably competent shop.

If your local shop does not have a selection of lockring
tools (for classic bottom bracket lockrings, for track hub
lockrings, etc) then do email me. I'll gladly sell you one.

We have a functional Park product at $14.95, a first rate
forged double-ended (25mm, 35mm) Hozan #205 for $29.95 and
the professional mechanic's preferred tool, the Var #16, at
$69.95, among others.

We hold the freewheel in a freewheel vise which secures the
low gear in a bench vise. A picture may help:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/tools.html

Feewheel vises are near the bottom. That nice Var tool is
last photo.

If you don't have a freewheel vise, I think a slim wrench
like the Park would fit between the freewheel and frame.
Shift to low gear and stand on one pedal. Once the lockring
breaks free, slip the wheel out of the bike for disassembly.
Obviously no special technique is needed to tighten.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
> On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 21:46:41 +0000, Steve W wrote:
>>Quote from SB web site:
>>"Shimano Hyperglide freewheels use all splined sprockets, with a
>>threaded lockring, similar to the system used on Hyperglide cassette
>>hubs"
>>I need the tool to undo the lockring


Matt O'Toole wrote:
> In a pinch you may have success with large Vise-Grips, clamped
> to the outer edge of the lockring. Try holding the cogs by wrapping them
> with a rag.
> You can get the regular spline tool at most bike shops.
> But better than that is a portable one, like the old Pamir Hypercracker:
> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/stein-mini-lock/
> Let me explain why. First, sometimes you can just wrap the cogs
> with a rag, but if the lockring is tight you may need a chainwhip.
> Second, if the lockring is really tight, it's easy to strip the splines --
> especially if you're using the other hand to hold the cogs.
> A Hypercracker-type tool solves both these problems. It uses your bike's
> chain so it eliminates the need for a chainwhip. Since it's sandwiched
> between the lockring and the frame it cannot slip or strip. It takes an
> extra step (putting the wheel back in the frame), but it's practically
> idiot-proof. Therefore I believe it's a better choice for a home
> mechanic. Plus it takes very little space in your toolkit.
> If you're lucky, you might find an original Hypercracker for a few bucks.
> This is one tool I refuse to lend!
> Finally, there's no reason for the lockring to be super-tight. Don't
> tighten it too much, and it will be much easier to remove the next time.


I believe he meant the 38mm ID / 45mm OD lockring that holds
the sprockets on a freewheel body, not a cassette lockring.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Sheldon Brown
([email protected]) wrote:

> I only once ever had occasion to take one of these apart, and I did it
> with a hammer and punch.


Wot Sheldon said. Many years ago I had an Ultra 6 with an unfortunate
habit of loosening its lockring and occasionally scattering ball
bearings across the scenery like so much grass seed. The hammer and
punch were frequently called into service until I grew tired of such
malarkey and bought a Maillard instead.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
I'm just a primitive creature of the heath, so pardon my savage
ignorance.
 

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