Is this a great sport or what?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Sir Ride-A-Lot, Sep 22, 2003.

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  1. Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My goal
    is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!

    Thank you MTB!

    Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.
     
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  2. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    >
    > Thank you MTB!
    >
    > Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.

    Congratulations!

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  3. Sdc

    Sdc Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    >
    > Thank you MTB!
    >
    > Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.

    That's great, but don't lose so much weight so fast. Make sure you lose fat, not muscle and water.
    And if you're eating crappy, you should change your diet regardless of what you weigh. You can be
    fit and trim but have high bad cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, etc.

    Enjoy, SDC
     
  4. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On 22 Sep 2003 07:36:25 -0700, Sir Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!

    Same thing happened to me the first summer I started MTBing (20 lbs). And unlike dieting, I
    maintained that weight for years. That was, until I hit my mid-40s (damn metabolism). I'm still 12
    lbs lighter than I was in my mid-30s, though.

    I'm not sure I'd call this a "sport" though. I'm not competing with anybody, and everyone's a winner
    if all come back in one piece.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  5. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    Keep at it.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  6. On 22 Sep 2003 07:36:25 -0700, Sir Ride-A-Lot <[email protected]> penned:
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    >
    > Thank you MTB!
    >
    > Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.

    Grats! Man, I wish I could find the time to ride that often (yes, I know, it's a choice ... I should
    say "I wsh I weren't so damn lazy").

    How far are you from your goal?

    --
    monique

    My pointless ramblings: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/phorum/index.php?f=6
     
  7. "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!

    Good for you! Wish it worked that way for me.
     
  8. "SDC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    > >
    > > Thank you MTB!
    > >
    > > Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.
    >
    > That's great, but don't lose so much weight so fast. Make sure you lose fat, not muscle and water.
    > And if you're eating crappy, you should change your diet regardless of what you weigh. You can be
    > fit and trim but have high bad cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, etc.
    >
    > Enjoy, SDC

    First let me tell you I am a 40 year old male who was 184 pounds. While that may not seem too bad,
    at 5'5" (go ahead with the short jokes) it is heavy. I am now at 169 and heading for 159.

    I am not a bad eater and my cholesterol is well within the limits. I usually eat about 6-8 ounces of
    chicken, lean beef, or fish and a salad. I never eat bfast (I know, bad thing) and have a salad or
    turkey sandwich for lunch. I rarely eat deserts. Ah but my one sin is beer (who's isn't?).

    I have noticed that now my heart rate when riding is very stable and I rarely huff and puff any more
    on the inclines.
     
  9. D H

    D H Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > First let me tell you I am a 40 year old male who was 184 pounds. While that may not seem too bad,
    > at 5'5" (go ahead with the short jokes) it is heavy. I am now at 169 and heading for 159.
    >
    > I am not a bad eater and my cholesterol is well within the limits. I usually eat about 6-8 ounces
    > of chicken, lean beef, or fish and a salad. I never eat bfast (I know, bad thing) and have a salad
    > or turkey sandwich for lunch. I rarely eat deserts. Ah but my one sin is beer (who's isn't?).

    Well, I'll pass the beer on to you all day or night, never having developed a taste for it.
    Give me the desserts, amost anything; topped with ice cream is even better; chocolate is
    superb. It sounds like you eat better than I do, so just a suggestion IF you ever decide to
    add breakfast to the mix. I have a bowl of Kashi Go Lean with sliced banana almost every
    morning. It is very high in both protein and fiber, and holds you through the day very well,
    if need be. (The fiber helps maintain better flow through the system, for those of us who are
    *ahem* firmer than we wanna be.) At 45, I discovered Kashi about 2 or 3 years ago, and
    attribute at least part of my good numbers to it. My total cholesterol dropped 8 points to
    201; yes, that's barely in the high range, but my Hdl went up from 76 to 79 over the same
    period (about 4 years between checks, I think) so my cholesterol ratio is 2.5, which means I
    should have no concerns about it whatsoever. I eat plenty of everything, both good stuff and
    bad stuff, and in my opinion, it all balances out, particularly if you get good, regular
    exercise. (That's bound to be at least partially responsible for my high Hdl numbers.) I'm
    5'9" and stay pretty close to 159 pounds myself, up or down maybe 3 pounds depending on the
    season and how diligent I've been on the bike.

    > I have noticed that now my heart rate when riding is very stable and I rarely huff and puff any
    > more on the inclines.

    That's great. Keep it up! And for the next level, if you ever have to resort to added measures,
    try to put in some intervals of faster cadence/speed to pump the heart rate up again. Not every
    ride, maybe only once or twice a week. You don't want to get stuck in a rut of only being able
    to go one speed ALL the time. I did that for the first few years of mountain biking, but racing
    forced me to change that. I'm glad it did, because it took me to another level not only in terms
    of fitness but also in skills that only come into play at faster speeds. (I'm no mountain dew
    downhiller, mind you. I hope to keep on riding for a long time!!!) The best thing about biking
    is that you can continue to improve and learn new tricks all the time. I expect to be continuing
    to improve in some way for another 40 years if I have the chance.
    --
    Off to ride the mountains, D H Reply to newsgroup. Spam is out of control.
     
  10. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    >
    > Thank you MTB!
    >
    > Sorry, I just had to share this with the world.

    Awesome bro!!!

    Hey, I'm 5'5" too. Not long ago I hit 190 lbs and now I'm around 160, which was my goal. I've since
    set a new goal for 140. But I have to confess I needed a diet change.

    Keep up the riding!
    --
    Slacker
     
  11. Stamkis

    Stamkis Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    >

    Haven't posted in well over year. I've been lurking for a while. Just wanted to add my
    congratulations for your weight loss. Never had a weight problem, yet know lots of people that
    do. Losing and keeping weight off is one of the most difficult things to accomplish. Keep up the
    good work.

    Not to be a naysayer, but I like to shed a word of warning if you are riding on a daily basis at
    your age. I rode for hours a day off and on for years without any problems with my road bike.
    Eventually, nerve compression damage in my hands caught up with me and I had to quit. Fortunately, I
    found someone from my local bike shop who helped me over-come this problem. He re-positioned my seat
    and taught me how to ride using less pressure on my hands. It worked out fairly well. I still get
    soreness from time to time, but no real pain. Last year I bought a mountain bike. Found this to be
    far more jarring to the hands than road biking. During the Fall I rode 2-3 times a week. After a
    while I noticed lots of soreness around the thumb area. Didn't ride in the winter because of the
    weather, but the soreness lingered well into the Spring. This is unusual for me.

    My advice, if you are riding on a daily basis, is to watch how much pressure you are putting on your
    hands and to ease up if you are feeling any pain or tingling sensations. I would also recommend
    cross-training (roller-blading, jogging, etc.) as much as possible. This may cut your risk of
    repetitive stress damage.

    Now that the Fall is here I am once again doing more mountain bike riding. However, this year I have
    made some adjustments. I am not trying to climb steep hills or to maneuver the most technical parts
    of a trail. l am finding that it puts too much stress on my hands to hold the bike in place over
    this rough and challenging terrain. Lately, I simply walk my bike or avoid those areas if possible.
    So far this season my thumbs and hands are feeling great, but I'm constantly aware of how much
    pressure I apply to my bike and try to keep the heavy pressure to a minimum. Once again
    congratulations and wish you continued success.
     
  12. "stamkis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost 15 pounds in six weeks! My
    > > > goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet change!
    > >
    >
    > Haven't posted in well over year. I've been lurking for a while. Just wanted to add my
    > congratulations for your weight loss. Never had a weight problem, yet know lots of people that
    > do. Losing and keeping weight off is one of the most difficult things to accomplish. Keep up the
    > good work.
    >
    > Not to be a naysayer, but I like to shed a word of warning if you are riding on a daily basis at
    > your age. I rode for hours a day off and on for years without any problems with my road bike.
    > Eventually, nerve compression damage in my hands caught up with me and I had to quit. Fortunately,
    > I found someone from my local bike shop who helped me over-come this problem. He re-positioned my
    > seat and taught me how to ride using less pressure on my hands. It worked out fairly well. I still
    > get soreness from time to time, but no real pain. Last year I bought a mountain bike. Found this
    > to be far more jarring to the hands than road biking. During the Fall I rode 2-3 times a week.
    > After a while I noticed lots of soreness around the thumb area. Didn't ride in the winter because
    > of the weather, but the soreness lingered well into the Spring. This is unusual for me.
    >
    > My advice, if you are riding on a daily basis, is to watch how much pressure you are putting on
    > your hands and to ease up if you are feeling any pain or tingling sensations. I would also
    > recommend cross-training (roller-blading, jogging, etc.) as much as possible. This may cut your
    > risk of repetitive stress damage.
    >
    > Now that the Fall is here I am once again doing more mountain bike riding. However, this year I
    > have made some adjustments. I am not trying to climb steep hills or to maneuver the most technical
    > parts of a trail. l am finding that it puts too much stress on my hands to hold the bike in place
    > over this rough and challenging terrain. Lately, I simply walk my bike or avoid those areas if
    > possible. So far this season my thumbs and hands are feeling great, but I'm constantly aware of
    > how much pressure I apply to my bike and try to keep the heavy pressure to a minimum. Once again
    > congratulations and wish you continued success.

    Thanks. I know what you mean about repetative stress. I have been a computer guy all my life. Two
    years ago I had surgery on my wrist to remove a growth on one of my tendons. The cause... typing too
    much! I checked with my doc and he ok'd the riding as long as I did wrist crunches every night.

    Once a year I go west to downhill for a week. That's when I feel the wrist pain. I guess it's from
    squeezing the brakes for dear life - LOL.

    Do you keep your seat higher or lower? Unfortunately for me, on an 18" bike I am already riding the
    seat as low as it will go. I've even had to cut the post. Also, as much as I hate them cause their
    ugly as sh*t, I use bar-ends to reposition my hands now and then.
     
  13. Stamkis

    Stamkis Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "stamkis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Since I have started MTBing routinely on a daily basis, I have lost
    15
    > > > > pounds in six weeks! My goal is 159 (I'm 5'5"). BTW, that weight loss is without a diet
    > > > > change!
    > > >
    > >
    > > Haven't posted in well over year. I've been lurking for a while. Just wanted to add my
    > > congratulations for your weight loss. Never had a
    weight
    > > problem, yet know lots of people that do. Losing and keeping weight off
    is
    > > one of the most difficult things to accomplish. Keep up the good work.
    > >
    > > Not to be a naysayer, but I like to shed a word of warning if you are
    riding
    > > on a daily basis at your age. I rode for hours a day off and on for
    years
    > > without any problems with my road bike. Eventually, nerve compression damage in my hands caught
    > > up with me and I had to quit. Fortunately, I found someone from my local bike shop who helped me
    > > over-come this
    problem.
    > > He re-positioned my seat and taught me how to ride using less pressure
    on my
    > > hands. It worked out fairly well. I still get soreness from time to
    time,
    > > but no real pain. Last year I bought a mountain bike. Found this to be far more jarring
    to
    > > the hands than road biking. During the Fall I rode 2-3 times a week.
    After
    > > a while I noticed lots of soreness around the thumb area. Didn't ride
    in
    > > the winter because of the weather, but the soreness lingered well into
    the
    > > Spring. This is unusual for me.
    > >
    > > My advice, if you are riding on a daily basis, is to watch how much
    pressure
    > > you are putting on your hands and to ease up if you are feeling any pain
    or
    > > tingling sensations. I would also recommend cross-training
    (roller-blading,
    > > jogging, etc.) as much as possible. This may cut your risk of
    repetitive
    > > stress damage.
    > >
    > > Now that the Fall is here I am once again doing more mountain bike
    riding.
    > > However, this year I have made some adjustments. I am not trying to
    climb
    > > steep hills or to maneuver the most technical parts of a trail. l am finding that it puts too
    > > much stress on my hands to hold the bike in
    place
    > > over this rough and challenging terrain. Lately, I simply walk my bike
    or
    > > avoid those areas if possible. So far this season my thumbs and hands
    are
    > > feeling great, but I'm constantly aware of how much pressure I apply to
    my
    > > bike and try to keep the heavy pressure to a minimum. Once again congratulations and wish you
    > > continued success.
    >
    > Thanks. I know what you mean about repetative stress. I have been a computer guy all my life.
    > Two years ago I had surgery on my wrist to remove a growth on one of my tendons. The cause...
    > typing too much! I checked with my doc and he ok'd the riding as long as I did wrist crunches
    > every night.
    >
    > Once a year I go west to downhill for a week. That's when I feel the wrist pain. I guess it's from
    > squeezing the brakes for dear life - LOL.
    >
    > Do you keep your seat higher or lower? Unfortunately for me, on an 18" bike I am already riding
    > the seat as low as it will go. I've even had to cut the post. Also, as much as I hate them cause
    > their ugly as sh*t, I use bar-ends to reposition my hands now and then.

    It was really the tilt of the road bike seat that he adjusted. He angled it upward slightly. As for
    the my mountain bike, the seat is rather level, but far lower than the road bike. I also have some
    sort of Monkey Lite(?) riser bar for the handle bars. I think this may help. (I'm not sure what
    it's called.)
     
  14. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On 23 Sep 2003 03:45:32 -0700, Sir Ride-A-Lot wrote:

    > Do you keep your seat higher or lower? Unfortunately for me, on an 18" bike I am already riding
    > the seat as low as it will go. I've even had to cut the post. Also, as much as I hate them cause
    > their ugly as sh*t, I use bar-ends to reposition my hands now and then.

    Be careful about keeping the seat too low; next thing you know your knees will be "the problem". I
    was doing pretty well with this until last year (43 at the time). Mainly that was from one ride & me
    trying to climb in too high a gear. I had to stop riding for a couple of weeks, and still feel it
    from time to time.

    I try to keep my seat high enough that my knee is just slightly bent at the longest point (when the
    pedal is closest to the ground). I'll lower it if there's a long downhill coming (actually, my seat
    is "self-lowering" because it constantly slips).

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
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