Is this race distance reasonable?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by nospam, Oct 24, 2004.

  1. nospam

    nospam Guest

    I have been running consistently for about 2 months and did a six mile
    run this morning with no problems (though my shins are a bit sore
    right now). During the week I try to run 2-3 times, usually a 2-3
    miler each time.

    In about 4 weeks (Nov. 20) there is a metric half-marathon in my town
    that I would like to run, which equates to about 8.1 miles. Is this a
    reasonable to goal if I increase my distance by a half-mile or so for
    each run runing the week up to the week of the race?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I run about 6 miles a day for 6 days a week and sometime 3 miles on my "bad"
    days. I'm running a half-marathon this coming saturday. I think it's about
    knowing what you "can" do. If you feel your ready, then yea. No magical
    equations here. But don't hurt yourself by trying to set a PR or go at it
    the wrong way. Just relaz and have a good time.


    "nospam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I have been running consistently for about 2 months and did a six mile
    > run this morning with no problems (though my shins are a bit sore
    > right now). During the week I try to run 2-3 times, usually a 2-3
    > miler each time.
    >
    > In about 4 weeks (Nov. 20) there is a metric half-marathon in my town
    > that I would like to run, which equates to about 8.1 miles. Is this a
    > reasonable to goal if I increase my distance by a half-mile or so for
    > each run runing the week up to the week of the race?
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  3. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "nospam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >I have been running consistently for about 2 months and did a six mile
    > run this morning with no problems (though my shins are a bit sore
    > right now). During the week I try to run 2-3 times, usually a 2-3
    > miler each time.
    >
    > In about 4 weeks (Nov. 20) there is a metric half-marathon in my town
    > that I would like to run, which equates to about 8.1 miles. Is this a
    > reasonable to goal if I increase my distance by a half-mile or so for
    > each run runing the week up to the week of the race?


    Sure, I'd do it. Sounds like a bold plan for a complete
    beginner and I would be careful; having a plan of simply
    finishing on my feet without injury and being happy for
    the experience.

    Don't change your running plan much now. At your level,
    simply getting out there on a regular basis is making you
    improve at a relatively fast pace. Your half-mile increase
    plan sounds okay. The shin pain is common among new
    runners - avoid hills and rub them with a rolling pin at
    night.

    Let us know how it went! I love reading about first races.
    Don't get caught up in the excitement and go out at too
    fast a pace. Pretend it's one of your training runs for the
    first half, pick it up a tiny bit at halfway if you feel good,
    and finish smiling!

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton ON)
    www.absolutelyaccurate.com
    www.allfalldown.org
     
  4. >That's an interesting term, a metric half marathon that is 8.1 miles.

    It's 13.1K. I have the race flier in front of me. (Assuming it's the
    same one, in Flower Mound, north of Fort Worth -- I don't know where
    nospam is, but I can't imagine *two* of these oddball events in
    different cities on the same day.)

    It's an interesting distance to race at. I bet the organizers wanted
    *something* to set it apart from the plethora of other runs in the
    area (last weekend, for instance, there were 10 5Ks on Saturday and a
    few other races on Sunday).

    --
    Brian P. Baresch
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  5. nospam

    nospam Guest

    Yep, that's it. Sorry, I didn't know that a "Metric Half-Marathon"
    was not a common race.

    Thanks for all of the advice. Given my slow pace, trying to win
    didn't even enter my mind.


    >>That's an interesting term, a metric half marathon that is 8.1 miles.

    >
    >It's 13.1K. I have the race flier in front of me. (Assuming it's the
    >same one, in Flower Mound, north of Fort Worth -- I don't know where
    >nospam is, but I can't imagine *two* of these oddball events in
    >different cities on the same day.)
    >
    >It's an interesting distance to race at. I bet the organizers wanted
    >*something* to set it apart from the plethora of other runs in the
    >area (last weekend, for instance, there were 10 5Ks on Saturday and a
    >few other races on Sunday).
     
  6. << Yep, that's it. Sorry, I didn't know that a "Metric Half-Marathon"
    was not a common race. >>

    What is a "Metric Half-Marathon"?
    Thanks for explaining!

    [By the way, it's not raining, this moment ~
    Later, yes, forecasted showers,
    Stormy weather, all laced
    With a bunch of heather ~
    Oops, forgot my sweater!]

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  7. << fast a pace. Pretend it's one of your training runs for the
    first half, pick it up a tiny bit at halfway if you feel good,
    and finish smiling!

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton ON) >>

    Great Counsel!
    Wise advice ~
    An ounce of prevention,
    Just a once upon
    A time
    Tale...

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  8. << Great Counsel!
    Wise advice ~
    An ounce of prevention,
    Just a once upon
    A time
    Tale...>>

    Told twice.

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  9. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On 25 Oct 2004 17:23:11 GMT, [email protected]entary (Brilliant One)
    wrote:

    ><< Yep, that's it. Sorry, I didn't know that a "Metric Half-Marathon"
    >was not a common race. >>
    >
    >What is a "Metric Half-Marathon"?
    >Thanks for explaining!
    >


    Since a marathon is 26.2 miles, a half-marathon is 13.1 miles
    (obviously). Instead of saying miles, however, they substitute KM,
    but (conveniently for us newbies), don't convert the distance. So, it
    becomes 13.1 KM, or, roughly, 8.1 miles.

    I'm sure there is an easier explanation, but that's all I've got.
     
  10. Bjorn Olsson

    Bjorn Olsson Guest

    nospam <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have been running consistently for about 2 months and did a six mile
    > run this morning with no problems (though my shins are a bit sore
    > right now). During the week I try to run 2-3 times, usually a 2-3
    > miler each time.
    >
    > In about 4 weeks (Nov. 20) there is a metric half-marathon in my town
    > that I would like to run, which equates to about 8.1 miles. Is this a
    > reasonable to goal if I increase my distance by a half-mile or so for
    > each run runing the week up to the week of the race?


    Sure. I started running in late June or early July and did a
    half-marathon in early October. I completed the half-marathon in just
    under 2 hours, and managed without any walking. It actually felt
    pretty easy. My longest run before the half-marathon was 14K, i.e.
    two-thirds of the distance, which I did about 1.5 weeks before race
    day. It was mainly for psychological reasons, since I figured if I
    could do two-thirds of the distance, I'd manage with the remaning
    third one way or another on race day. Apart from the 14K run the week
    before, I did 4 or 5 10K runs in the preceding weeks, otherwise only
    shorter distances of 3-7 K, about 3-4 times per week.

    Since you've just done a 6 mile run without problems, I reckon you are
    pretty much prepared for the 8.1 miles already, so I'm not sure you
    relly need to increase your training dose. Just keeping your current
    level up for the next 3-4 weeks should be sufficient (if all you want
    to do is to complete the race).

    Bjorn
     
  11. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Leafing through rec.running, I read Ignoramus6961's message of 25 Oct 2004:

    > 8.1 miles is not a very long distance...


    It depends on how you cover it. At an easy pace, it's not very long.
    However, covering it as fast as you can will make it seem painfully long.
    Ever run a mile as fast as you can? This is extreme toruture.

    Phil M.

    --
    "What counts in battle is what you do once the pain sets in." -John Short,
    South African coach.
     
  12. Sam

    Sam Guest

    How would a "metric" half marathon be 8.1 miles when a marathon in metric
    terms is 21.1 km? That is 13.1 miles. I am confused.

    If the race is 8 miles, I see now reason you could not finish it as long as
    you take it easy.
    "nospam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have been running consistently for about 2 months and did a six mile
    > run this morning with no problems (though my shins are a bit sore
    > right now). During the week I try to run 2-3 times, usually a 2-3
    > miler each time.
    >
    > In about 4 weeks (Nov. 20) there is a metric half-marathon in my town
    > that I would like to run, which equates to about 8.1 miles. Is this a
    > reasonable to goal if I increase my distance by a half-mile or so for
    > each run runing the week up to the week of the race?
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  13. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Great, just what running needs is more confusing names for race distances.


    "Brian Baresch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > >That's an interesting term, a metric half marathon that is 8.1 miles.

    >
    > It's 13.1K. I have the race flier in front of me. (Assuming it's the
    > same one, in Flower Mound, north of Fort Worth -- I don't know where
    > nospam is, but I can't imagine *two* of these oddball events in
    > different cities on the same day.)
    >
    > It's an interesting distance to race at. I bet the organizers wanted
    > *something* to set it apart from the plethora of other runs in the
    > area (last weekend, for instance, there were 10 5Ks on Saturday and a
    > few other races on Sunday).
    >
    > --
    > Brian P. Baresch
    > Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    > Professional editing and proofreading
    >
    > If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  14. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Eventually it has to happen: I agree with Ig on this one.


    "Ignoramus6961" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 19:53:52 GMT, nospam <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On 25 Oct 2004 17:23:11 GMT, [email protected]entary (Brilliant One)
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>><< Yep, that's it. Sorry, I didn't know that a "Metric Half-Marathon"
    >>>was not a common race. >>
    >>>
    >>>What is a "Metric Half-Marathon"?
    >>>Thanks for explaining!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Since a marathon is 26.2 miles, a half-marathon is 13.1 miles
    >> (obviously). Instead of saying miles, however, they substitute KM,
    >> but (conveniently for us newbies), don't convert the distance. So, it
    >> becomes 13.1 KM, or, roughly, 8.1 miles.
    >>
    >> I'm sure there is an easier explanation, but that's all I've got.

    >
    > This is not directed at you, but I cannot resist.
    >
    > I am a little bit irked by how some race officials use the term
    > "metric" to perform shenanigans and promote innumeracy, and denigrate
    > the metric system by association.
    >
    > A metric marathon is 42,195 meters. Same as 26.2 miles.
    >
    > A metric half marathon is 21,097 meters, same as 13.1 miles.
    >
    > 13,200 meters is not "metric half marathon".
    >
    > What you are describing sounds more properly as "1/3 marathon".
    >
    > --
    > Running Log: http://igor.chudov.com/weightloss/exercise.txt
     
  15. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How would a "metric" half marathon be 8.1 miles when a marathon in metric
    > terms is 21.1 km? That is 13.1 miles. I am confused.
    >



    In cycling, a century is 100 miles and a metric century is 100 k. In
    running, they're saying that a half-Marathon is 13.1 miles so a "metric"
    half marathon is 13.1 k. Get it?

    --Harold Buck


    "I used to rock and roll all night,
    and party every day.
    Then it was every other day. . . ."
    -Homer J. Simpson
     
  16. M1ahearn

    M1ahearn Guest

    >> >That's an interesting term, a metric half marathon that is 8.1 miles.

    It's 13.1K. I have the race flier in front of me. (Assuming it's the same one,
    in Flower Mound, north of Fort Worth -- I don't know where nospam is, but I
    can't imagine *two* of these oddball events in different cities on the same
    day.) <<

    I ran it last year. I think they had to do some weird doubling back to
    get the proper distance. I would have been just as happy if they had made it a
    12K or something.

    >> It's an interesting distance to race at. I bet the organizers wanted

    *something* to set it apart from the plethora of other runs in the area (last
    weekend, for instance, there were 10 5Ks on Saturday and a
    few other races on Sunday). <<

    I don't know why one of these races that are scheduled for the same day as
    a jillion other races doesn't try altering the distance slightly - say a
    four-miler or a five-miler - to separate themselves from the crowd.

    Mike

    --
     
  17. Sam

    Sam Guest

    No, I do not get it. I think it is ridiculous. A metric century makes
    perfect sense as being 100km.


    "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> How would a "metric" half marathon be 8.1 miles when a marathon in metric
    >> terms is 21.1 km? That is 13.1 miles. I am confused.
    >>

    >
    >
    > In cycling, a century is 100 miles and a metric century is 100 k. In
    > running, they're saying that a half-Marathon is 13.1 miles so a "metric"
    > half marathon is 13.1 k. Get it?
    >
    > --Harold Buck
    >
    >
    > "I used to rock and roll all night,
    > and party every day.
    > Then it was every other day. . . ."
    > -Homer J. Simpson
     
  18. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "M1ahearn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >>> >That's an interesting term, a metric half marathon that is 8.1 miles.

    >
    > It's 13.1K. I have the race flier in front of me. (Assuming it's the same
    > one,
    > in Flower Mound, north of Fort Worth -- I don't know where nospam is, but
    > I
    > can't imagine *two* of these oddball events in different cities on the
    > same
    > day.) <<
    >
    > I ran it last year. I think they had to do some weird doubling back
    > to
    > get the proper distance. I would have been just as happy if they had made
    > it a
    > 12K or something.
    >
    >>> It's an interesting distance to race at. I bet the organizers wanted

    > *something* to set it apart from the plethora of other runs in the area
    > (last
    > weekend, for instance, there were 10 5Ks on Saturday and a
    > few other races on Sunday). <<
    >
    > I don't know why one of these races that are scheduled for the same
    > day as
    > a jillion other races doesn't try altering the distance slightly - say a
    > four-miler or a five-miler - to separate themselves from the crowd.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    > --


    I think 8K, 5 milers and 10 milers are excellent distances as is the 15K (a
    person favorite of mine).
     
  19. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >No, I do not get it. I think it is ridiculous. A metric century makes
    >perfect sense as being 100km.
    >


    Sam,

    I think it's the same concept as "lite" beer. LOL

    Mike Tennent
    "IronPenguin"
     
  20. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> How would a "metric" half marathon be 8.1 miles when a marathon in metric
    > >> terms is 21.1 km? That is 13.1 miles. I am confused.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > In cycling, a century is 100 miles and a metric century is 100 k. In
    > > running, they're saying that a half-Marathon is 13.1 miles so a "metric"
    > > half marathon is 13.1 k. Get it?
    > >

    > No, I do not get it. I think it is ridiculous. A metric century makes
    > perfect sense as being 100km.
    >


    (Top-posting corrected)

    I'm not saying it makes a whole lot of sense. I'm just showing you where
    they got the idea: they changed "miles" to "km" and called it metric.
    Everyone was shouting about how they couldn't see where they came up
    with the distance, and that's how they did it.

    --Harold Buck


    "I used to rock and roll all night,
    and party every day.
    Then it was every other day. . . ."
    -Homer J. Simpson
     
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