Is this usual?



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Gadget

Guest
Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear and Crossroads Ex 1.95 on
the front. This was from Continental Vertical 2.3's. After a few test rides I have come to this
conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase yet my energy seems to decrease a little to
quick. I also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I
want to I could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride an
Orange Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be
appreciated.

Gadget
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear
and
> Crossroads Ex 1.95 on the front. This was from Continental Vertical 2.3's. After a few test rides
> I have come to this conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase yet my energy seems to
> decrease a little to quick.
I
> also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I want to I
> could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride an Orange
> Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be appreciated.
>
> Gadget
>
>
Hi Gadget. I'd always assumed, that all other things being equal, i.e. pressure etc, the thinner the
tyre, the less friction / drag, the easier it is to accelerate etc. I've got Conti 2.3s on my full
suss MTB but keep them highly inflated to prevent snakebites (I'm heavy ;-). They aren't too bad but
they are very knobbly, so it's not the whole width of the tyre hitting the floor. However, I've also
got a roadbike that has 1.25 on. No comparisson, it flies, but all things are not equal, bigger
wheels, no suspension, different gearing, lighter bike, different surface (tarmac vs. singletrack),
so, no help at all....sorry ;-)

In the meantime..... I've got a friend with an Orange Gringo. It has 24" wheels and 26" tyres. First
time I've ever seen this. Advised he took it back to the LBS. He did and they told him this is how
all Orange Gringos are. I've double checked the numbers on the wheel and tyre. They are right. Is
this the case with yours ? Cheers, Dave.
 
G

Gadget

Guest
"Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear
> and
> > Crossroads Ex 1.95 on the front. This was from Continental Vertical
2.3's.
> > After a few test rides I have come to this conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase
> > yet my energy seems to decrease a little to
quick.
> I
> > also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I want to
> > I could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride an
> > Orange Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be
> > appreciated.
> >
> > Gadget
> >
> >
> Hi Gadget. I'd always assumed, that all other things being equal, i.e. pressure etc, the thinner
> the tyre, the less friction / drag, the easier it is to accelerate etc. I've got Conti 2.3s on my
> full suss MTB but keep them
highly
> inflated to prevent snakebites (I'm heavy ;-). They aren't too bad but
they
> are very knobbly, so it's not the whole width of the tyre hitting the
floor.
> However, I've also got a roadbike that has 1.25 on. No comparisson, it flies, but all things are
> not equal, bigger wheels, no suspension,
different
> gearing, lighter bike, different surface (tarmac vs. singletrack), so, no help at all....sorry ;-)
>
> In the meantime..... I've got a friend with an Orange Gringo. It has 24" wheels and 26" tyres.
> First time I've ever seen this. Advised he took it back to the LBS. He did and they told him this
> is how all Orange Gringos are. I've double checked the numbers on the wheel and tyre. They are
right.
> Is this the case with yours ? Cheers, Dave.
>
>

Quick simple answer would be Yes. My rims are 24", my tyres are 26". I keep my CV's at full psi,
same with the slicks that are now on the bike.

Gadget
 
A

Ambrose Nankive

Guest
In news:[email protected], Gadget
<[email protected]> typed:
> Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear and Crossroads Ex 1.95 on
> the front. This was from Continental Vertical 2.3's. After a few test rides I have come to this
> conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase yet my energy seems to decrease a little to
> quick. I also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I
> want to I could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride
> an Orange Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be
> appreciated.

I've noticed this as I've recently been having to use my rather posh mountain bike as a general
purpose bike (although there's some ill-fitting ones I can use for just popping into town). I think
that quite a lot of the rolling resistance from knobbly tyres is specific to cheap knobbly tyres
with a stiff carcass under the tread, and that some slicks may also have stiff enough carcasses to
increase rolling resistance(easy way to increase puncture protection).

It could also be that the brakes are rubbing after refitting the wheel slightly differently, but
that's unlikely.

Ambrose
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
<snip>
> >
>
> Quick simple answer would be Yes. My rims are 24", my tyres are 26". I
keep
> my CV's at full psi, same with the slicks that are now on the bike.
>
> Gadget
>
eerrrmmmm...... wtf is going on there then ?...thought 26 wheel required 26 tyre type of thing....
(life is so confusing sometimes!!) cheers, Dave.
 
M

Mark Davies

Guest
Gadget wrote:
> Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear and Crossroads Ex 1.95 on
> the front. This was from Continental Vertical 2.3's. After a few test rides I have come to this
> conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase yet my energy seems to decrease a little to
> quick. I also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I
> want to I could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride
> an Orange Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be
> appreciated.

You haven't recalibrated your computer?

:)

--

Mark Davies
 
G

Gadget

Guest
"Mark Davies" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Gadget wrote:
> > Recently converted my tyres over to Continental Travel 1.75 on the rear
and
> > Crossroads Ex 1.95 on the front. This was from Continental Vertical
2.3's.
> > After a few test rides I have come to this conclusion. My speed neither decreases nor increase
> > yet my energy seems to decrease a little to
quick. I
> > also was able to keep the bike up at 15mph on the CV 2.3's with the knowledge that if I want to
> > I could push a little harder, but with the slicks 15mph is all about I can manage. I ride an
> > Orange Gringo, I'm not sure if this makes a difference. Any comments, ideas etc would be
> > appreciated.
>
> You haven't recalibrated your computer?
>
> :)
What computer? I rely on GPS for my speedo. Hence the name Gadget. Maybe I'm just going to fast for
the sattelites to keep track. :eek:)

Gadget
 
E

Ellieg

Guest
"Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] binary.blueyonder.co.uk:

>> Quick simple answer would be Yes. My rims are 24", my tyres are 26". I keep my CV's at full psi,
>> same with the slicks that are now on the bike.

> eerrrmmmm...... wtf is going on there then ?...thought 26 wheel required 26 tyre type of thing....
> (life is so confusing sometimes!!)

Orange are American, I presume?

I gather that the Americans measure bike rims by the rim diameter, and tyres by the overall rolling
diameter - rather than (like anybody sensible would
do) the rim diameter....

(See my question about VeloSolexes - 19" rim, the French reckon 19" tyre, the Americans 21"...)
 
A

Ambrose Nankive

Guest
In news:[email protected], Dave <[email protected]> typed:
> In the meantime..... I've got a friend with an Orange Gringo. It has 24" wheels and 26" tyres.
> First time I've ever seen this. Advised he took it back to the LBS. He did and they told him this
> is how all Orange Gringos are. I've double checked the numbers on the wheel and tyre. They are
> right. Is this the case with yours ?

The wheels commonly known as 26 inches are about 600mm in diameter (24 inches), so that might be the
source of confusion. When you put a tyre on them, then the total diameter should be around 26
inches. So measuring the size of the rim doesn't give you the name of the wheel size. (Although all
rims of a given wheel size are of the same diameter, of course).

There is a little used old fashioned 26 inch wheel size where the tyre sizes are given as, for
example, 26 × 1 3/4 rather than 26 × 1.75, and they have a rim diameter of about 26 inches, just to
confuse the issue.

I'm not aware of any bikes on the UK market that take the larger 26" wheel size, though.

Hope that helps, not confuses.

Ambrose.
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
There's about seven different "twenty-six inch" sizes in the wild, but some are rarely encountered
in the wild these days. To avoid confusion, use the ISO system giving the rim's bead seat diameter
in millimetres... Sheldon Brown, as usual, hav the low-down:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html#isoetrto

Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
S

Sheldon Brown

Guest
EllieG <[email protected]> wrote:

> I gather that the Americans measure bike rims by the rim diameter, and tyres by the overall
> rolling diameter - rather than (like anybody sensible would
> do) the rim diameter....

I know American-bashing is great fun, but this is by no means an American peculiarity. _All_ of the
old nationality-based cycle tyre sizing systems were based on tyre tread diameters, including the
British, Canadian French German and Swedish systems!

The modern ISO/E.T.R.T.O. system is based on rim diameter, and is very much less confusing
as a result.

See: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Sheldon "Numbers" Brown Newtonville, Massachusetts USA
+-----------------------------------------------------+
| He is a barbarian, and thinks that the customs | of his tribe and island are the laws of nature.
| | --George Bernard Shaw |
+-----------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
Massachusetts Phone 617-244-1040 FAX 617-244-1041 http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris Hard-to-find
parts shipped Worldwide
 
I

Iain

Guest
.

>I know American-bashing is great fun, but this is by no means an American peculiarity. _All_ of the
>old nationality-based cycle tyre sizing systems were based on tyre tread diameters, including the
>British, Canadian French German and Swedish systems!
>
>The modern ISO/E.T.R.T.O. system is based on rim diameter, and is very much less confusing as
>a result.
>
>See: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
>
>Sheldon "Numbers" Brown Newtonville, Massachusetts USA

I vote Mr B is banned from the group until his face fungus returns.

(From one who has stood distant from a razor for over a decade, now.)
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
Iain <FatBlokeOnBike @ mother-truckers.co.uk> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...

> >I know American-bashing is great fun...

> I vote Mr B is banned from the group until his face fungus returns.

Come on, Sheldon, tell us how the guys in the shop reacted. I expect they took it pretty
matter-of-factly. Along the lines of, "Good morning, Mr. Brown. How well you look today."

:)

--
Dave...
 
S

Sheldon Brown

Guest
> Come on, Sheldon, tell us how the guys in the shop reacted. I expect they took it pretty
> matter-of-factly. Along the lines of, "Good morning, Mr. Brown. How well you look today."

Not quite. More like "Good morning, sir, how can we help you...oh my GAWD!!!"

Sheldon "Unrecognizable" Brown Newtonville, Massachusetts, Yankeeland
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| A man of character finds a special attractiveness in difficulty, | since it is only by coming to
| grips with difficulty | that he can realize his potentialities. -- Charles DeGaulle |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On 16 May 2003 11:29:43 -0700, [email protected] (Sheldon Brown) wrote:

>Sheldon "Unrecognizable" Brown

I have a theory that you were testing a carbon lowracer and the air friction burned the
whiskers off ;-)

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
[email protected] (Sheldon Brown) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > Come on, Sheldon, tell us how the guys in the shop reacted. I expect they took it pretty
> > matter-of-factly. Along the lines of, "Good morning, Mr. Brown. How well you look today."
>
> Not quite.

I think that might be the understatement of the year. :)

--
Dave...
 
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