Is weight training beneficial?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by spiz, Jan 9, 2004.

  1. spiz

    spiz Guest

    All

    I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    enhance cycling performance. Any feedback or on-line resources would
    be welcomed.

    Spiro:)



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    Tags:


  2. spiz wrote:
    >
    > All
    >
    > I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    > enhance cycling performance.


    Yes.

    > Any feedback or on-line resources would be welcomed.


    Two purposes; power improvement and balanced muscle development.

    You just need someone who can help you adjust it for your bicycling
    style.
     
  3. spiz <[email protected]> wrote in news:SUILb.76047$455.30737
    @fe16.usenetserver.com:

    > All
    >
    > I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    > enhance cycling performance. Any feedback or on-line resources would
    > be welcomed.
    >
    > Spiro:)


    Coach Ric Stern says not, except for a couple of special cases:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/fitness/?id=strengthstern

    Dislaimer: I work for Cyclingnews.com
     
  4. Veloflash

    Veloflash Guest

    Terry Collins <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > spiz wrote:
    > >
    > > All
    > >
    > > I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    > > enhance cycling performance.

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > Any feedback or on-line resources would be welcomed.

    >
    > Two purposes; power improvement and balanced muscle development.
    >
    > You just need someone who can help you adjust it for your bicycling
    > style.



    If you are an endurance rider (most cyclists) then weight training is
    contrary to mitochondria and capillary development. As of this date,
    evidence only points to weight training benefiting anaerobic track
    match sprinters/kilo TT/keirin riders.
     
  5. Jorgen

    Jorgen Guest

    "John Stevenson" <[email protected]> wrote in message [...]
    > Coach Ric Stern says not, except for a couple of special cases:


    Apologies for warping the thread a bit, but if you disregard cycling
    performance and look at the bigger picture (your overall health & fitness),
    wouldn't moderate exercise doing upper body strength exercises be a great
    way to bring balance to your physique?

    Lots & lots of cycling will give you really strong legs, even just a low
    1700Ks per year will give you reasonably strong ones (my case). I used to do
    much more, probably 6000-7000Ks per year but that was up till 2001 when
    cycling in Oslo, Norway - so that gave me a bit of a base which is still
    sort of in place even with the low Ks I'm doing now.

    Now I cycle mainly to work for fitness & convenience, averaging 25-30 kph
    when not waiting for red lights (when I do; mainly the big ones). This is on
    a reasonably good Gary Fisher MTB with combo slicks (knobbed sidewalls for
    the occasional mud cornering, flat top for better city riding).

    Combined with treadmill running [my knees are a bit bad and treadmill is the
    only running I can do], I might do my legs over in the gym 6 times per year;
    I don't need anything else to keep them in balance with my upper body which
    is what I mainly train.

    Also, if you're a total nut & can't go a day without exercise, splitting it
    up with one or two days of upper body strength might give your legs some
    much needed recovery time.

    Just my $0.02c.

    j
     
  6. Paulus

    Paulus Guest

    When I raced i dabbled with weight training.
    I performed "leg extensions" and "leg curls" one week. In my Saturday race,
    I could power away up a steep hill, but by the time I got to the top I was
    stuffed (dropped everyone else in the race though and had a good 30-40
    second lead).
    So, in my experience, weight training has benifits. Development of my
    aerobic system dragged behind though so the power applied up the hills was
    anaerobic.

    P


    "Veloflash" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Terry Collins <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > spiz wrote:
    > > >
    > > > All
    > > >
    > > > I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    > > > enhance cycling performance.

    > >
    > > Yes.
    > >
    > > > Any feedback or on-line resources would be welcomed.

    > >
    > > Two purposes; power improvement and balanced muscle development.
    > >
    > > You just need someone who can help you adjust it for your bicycling
    > > style.

    >
    >
    > If you are an endurance rider (most cyclists) then weight training is
    > contrary to mitochondria and capillary development. As of this date,
    > evidence only points to weight training benefiting anaerobic track
    > match sprinters/kilo TT/keirin riders.
     
  7. ftf

    ftf Guest

    spiz wrote:
    > All
    > I am looking for information on whether wieght training can help
    > enhance cycling performance. Any feedback or on-line resources would
    > be welcomed.
    > Spiro:)




    Some information you might find interesting at this link http://www.bod-
    ybuilding.com/fun/issa21.htmhttp://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/issa21.htm.
    It's targeted at MTB but just as applicable to cycling in general I
    would think. Cheers, Troy



    --
     
  8. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb Guest

    ftf wrote:
    > Some information you might find interesting at this link http://www.bod-
    > ybuilding.com/fun/issa21.htmhttp://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/issa21.htm.
    > It's targeted at MTB but just as applicable to cycling in general I
    > would think. Cheers, Troy



    For starters that's an excellent link. I've long had to contend with th
    after effects of neck/shoulder injuries, and have been interested i
    doing weight training to build upper body strength for MTB riding.
    couple of reps at a time, with adequate research and/or supervision jus
    might prove beneficial. ta ;


    -
     
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