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Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David Off, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. David Off

    David Off Guest

    There is a long interview with Lance in Le Figaro today where he
    reflects on this years TdF and the Dauphiné Liberé which he is treating
    as a 'training race' this year. The DL only starts with 12 teams due to
    a busy racing calendar. The prologue kicks off in Megève (lets hope
    Lance doesn't get a massage from Megève's most notorious resident,
    Gordon Wood, prime suspect in the murder of a glamourous Austrialian
    model). Armstrong sees Mayo and Hamilton (so long as he stays on his
    bike) as his main rivals. He sees the ITT on the Ventous on Thursday as
    good training for the l'Alpe d'Huez ITT in the TdF.

    In the interview Lance says he thinks there are too many pro-riders,
    over 1000 registered. He is highly motivated not to lose the tour this
    year. He thinks that it is possible for someone to win 10 Tour de
    France. He says he was underweight when he started the tour last year.
     
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  2. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

  3. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "David Off" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > He sees the ITT on the Ventous on Thursday as
    > good training for the l'Alpe d'Huez ITT in the TdF.
    >


    Maybe for training but not necessarily for comparison to Alpe d'Huez. Given
    comments I've read about the way Armstrong and CC have been studying and
    training for the Alpe with it's many hairpins and quick gradient changes,
    the Ventoux will not really be a good time trialing comparison. What it may
    tell everyone, is what his climbing legs are like this year. There is the
    old saw that the first thing to go as a cyclist ages is the climbing legs.
    It will be an interesting week.
     
  4. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Robert Chung wrote:
    > David Off wrote:
    >> There is a long interview with Lance in Le Figaro today

    >
    > http://www.lefigaro.fr/cgi/edition/genimprime?cle=20040605.FIG0011


    My rough translation, i.e., errors are almost certainly mine.

    On his current life:

    "The main outlines of my life haven't changed at all. I still ride with
    the same team, with the same guys. I still do the same job. It's true that
    I have a new partner (Sheryl Crow), which can give the appearance of a big
    change in my life, but it's not safe to trust appearances. When I went to
    see the Lakers play, for example, the game started at 7pm. That still left
    me time to train for 6 hours, to get a massage, to eat, and then go to the
    game. I go there in a comfortable car, I walk no more than 200 yards, I
    sit down, and I watch. At 11pm, I'm back home and in bed. It's possible to
    do all this and still be a serious bike racer. A racer isn't someone who
    trains and then spends the rest of the day in bed, only getting up to eat
    before heading back to bed. I still take my job seriously and all these
    questions will be answered in July.

    "I no longer feel like I'm only a Texan. I'm now pretty international. I
    feel good in Europe. I like the culture, the lifestyle. Much more so than
    was the case 10 or 15 years ago. I'm not very nationalistic. Currently, I
    feel like a mix of many countries, even though I'll return to the U.S. at
    the end of my career mostly to take care of Lance Armstrong Foundation
    business. It's doing better than ever and I still want to dedicate myself
    to this cause. There will come a time when I'm no longer able to
    participate in the TdF or the Dauphine--but the Foundation, that I can
    always do. That's still an important part of my life.

    "Today I feel like a normal healthy person, like someone who had never had
    a life-threatening health problem. Every once in a while certain memories
    surface, but little by little the fear of cancer recedes even if it never
    totally goes away."

    On his life as a racer:

    "I'm progressing normally. I think that last year, I showed up for the
    Tour a little too light. This year, I'm going to try to show up strong
    without being too 'cut.' In the Tour, you lose a little weight during the
    first week-and-a-half. How am I mentally? Excellent! You never know if
    it's perfect, but I feel really good. Loose. Calm and confident. The last
    few years we had goals for races like the Midi Libre and the Dauphine. We
    don't have those goals this year. I'm trying to save everything for July.

    "If I've done fewer races in Europe, I'm still as dedicated to cycling,
    still just as passionate about it. When I'm back home my only link to
    European cycling is the internet and I check it three or four times a day.
    I look at the results, the photos. I read rec.bicycles.racing,
    religiously. Never miss it. Sometimes I post there under a pseudonym,
    'Heather Halvorson.' Because of my family situation my April schedule
    changed. And, maybe it's for the better. April in the U.S. is different
    than April in Europe. In Europe, at that time of year, it's still cold;
    it's not always easy to train, to find big hills to climb. In California
    it was incredibly warm. It was perfect!"

    On his letter to the World Doping Agency:

    "There are lots of professional riders. More than a thousand. Maybe too
    many. During the year, I run across hardly more than 300. I feel closest
    to them. In fact, the open letter to Dick Pound wasn't just from Lance
    Armstrong or my team. It was in their name--in our name. It was for our
    sport. For everyone who makes it live. Did that make me closer to them?
    For those I run across, absolutely. Will the letter have an effect? I
    don't know. I recently read that Dick Pound was still attacking cycling.
    That might mean that my letter wasn't very good. Frankly, I'm not holding
    my breath that someone like Pound will listen to me. The real reason for
    that letter is that I thought that someone like him doesn't have the right
    to run a PR campaign for himself. He has one of the most important jobs in
    the sports world. His job is to do some walking, not just talking. That's
    all I wanted to tell him."

    On a record-setting sixth TdF win:

    "The Tour is the only race in the world that really matters. I'm always
    motivated by the fear of losing, by the idea of winning, by the desire not
    to let my teammates down. I know what it means to reach the Champs-Elysees
    five times with the maillot jaune. To see someone else climb onto the
    podium wearing the yellow jersey, that'd be a nightmare (he grimaces).
    It's a challenge, and I like it. The fact that all the great riders have
    tried it and no one has been able to do it. That's the motivation. I think
    the public likes this kind of challenge, that the folks on the side of the
    road at the Alpe d'Huez like to say: 'that guy did it and I was there.' If
    I'd been standing on the side of the road when Merckx won the Tour, I'd've
    been proud to be there. I sense, in France, pretty good support from the
    spectators. They say, 'Good luck for a sixth.'

    "Six victories, is that out of reach? We said that about Indurain. In
    1996, when he set out for the sixth, everyone said that the record would
    stand for years, that no one would beat it. Less than 10 years later, I
    find myself in his situation. Anything is possible. Maybe there's a young
    rider out there, the greatest rider in history, who'll win 10 Tours. I
    understand the significance of winning a sixth Tour, but I also understand
    the significance of a single win in the Tour de France. That's why I'm
    focusing everything on this Tour. The only thing that counts now is to
    win. Everything that I've done up to now is a hole card. That gives me
    experience. If I run into trouble, if I have a crisis, I know how to
    handle it. But to have won five Tours doesn't give me any other advantage
    than that."
     
  5. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > > David Off wrote:
    > >> There is a long interview with Lance in Le Figaro today

    > >
    > > http://www.lefigaro.fr/cgi/edition/genimprime?cle=20040605.FIG0011

    >
    > My rough translation, i.e., errors are almost certainly mine.
    >
    > When I'm back home my only link to
    > European cycling is the internet and I check it three or four times a day.
    > I look at the results, the photos. I read rec.bicycles.racing,
    > religiously. Never miss it. Sometimes I post there under a pseudonym,
    > 'Heather Halvorson.'


    Uh-huh.

    Andy Coggan
     
  6. On 06/06/2004 03:25 AM, in article [email protected], "Robert
    Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Robert Chung wrote:


    > "If I've done fewer races in Europe, I'm still as dedicated to cycling,
    > still just as passionate about it. When I'm back home my only link to
    > European cycling is the internet and I check it three or four times a day.
    > I look at the results, the photos. I read rec.bicycles.racing,
    > religiously. Never miss it. Sometimes I post there under a pseudonym,
    > 'Heather Halvorson.'




    POTY!!



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  7. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > My rough translation, i.e., errors are almost certainly mine.
    >
    > "When I'm back home my only link to
    > European cycling is the internet and I check it three or four times a day.
    > I look at the results, the photos. I read rec.bicycles.racing,
    > religiously. Never miss it. Sometimes I post there under a pseudonym,
    > 'Heather Halvorson.'


    Actually I said that I post as "cyclintom".
     
  8. h squared

    h squared Guest

    Andy Coggan wrote:
    >
    > "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > > David Off wrote:
    > > >> There is a long interview with Lance in Le Figaro today
    > > >
    > > > http://www.lefigaro.fr/cgi/edition/genimprime?cle=20040605.FIG0011

    > >
    > > My rough translation, i.e., errors are almost certainly mine.
    > >
    > > When I'm back home my only link to
    > > European cycling is the internet and I check it three or four times a day.
    > > I look at the results, the photos. I read rec.bicycles.racing,
    > > religiously. Never miss it. Sometimes I post there under a pseudonym,
    > > 'Heather Halvorson.'

    >
    > Uh-huh.
    >


    exactly!

    i missed robert's post, because i haven't been really reading any of the
    daupine libere posts on rbr. haven't had time to check out the race on
    cyclingnews and i was also hoping to see it on t.v. (maybe?) at some
    point. i suppose given this i should give up on waiting for that.

    the thought of LANCE posting under a capital letter deprived pseudonym
    does make me laugh, though.

    heather
    thanks to howard for alerting me to all of this :)
     
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