It can't be just me.

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by reply, Jul 6, 2003.

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  1. reply

    reply Guest

    Please - I'm not trying to start a bet vs DF war here, just an observation/question.

    The reason often given for bents not climbing well is that you can not stand up to push on the
    pedals, though you can push against the back of the seat. Now - the other day I was in a new gym and
    they had a recumbent leg press machine. I started pushing, increasing the weight, pushing. I finally
    reached the point where I was listing all the weight (240 lbs) with just one leg.

    Given that I weigh about 200 doesn't this mean that I can push 40 lbs more in a recumbent position,
    possibly more as I ran out of weights on the machine?

    I know there will also be some help by pulling down on the handle bars but don't know how much
    this will be.

    Any thoughts?

    Everso
     
    Tags:


  2. *does the cross thing with fingers*

    Not another bents can/can't climb thread. :)

    Try searching on Google for this and you will get lots of hits and rehashed arguments.

    Mikael
     
  3. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Mikael Seierup must be edykated coz e writed:

    > *does the cross thing with fingers*
    >
    > Not another bents can/can't climb thread. :)
    >
    > Try searching on Google for this and you will get lots of hits and rehashed arguments.
    >
    > Mikael
    >
    Yep another one, I'll let all the non "benters" into a little secret, recumbents use a different
    muscle set, after a while you can climb as well as a wedgie, sometimes a little slower, sometimes a
    little faster, every week I usually pass a certain MTB rider locally on a long hill, everytime he
    tries to race me, everytime he loses, he did once say the immortal words "I thought those things
    couldn't do hills", and he is a competitive club rider. I was passed by a hybrid the other day on
    the flat, I then passed him climbing a hill, at a junction at the top, he caught up then pedalled
    hard down the other side, and was dismayed as I free wheeled past him, and that was on a 9 speed
    Delta trike.

    Ian
     
  4. reply

    reply Guest

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >*does the cross thing with fingers*
    >
    >Not another bents can/can't climb thread. :)

    Please god no - that's why I posted on a 'bent group and not a general cycling group. I have
    searched and not really found and answer to this
    - that's all.

    >
    >Try searching on Google for this and you will get lots of hits and rehashed arguments.
    >
    >Mikael
     
  5. <[email protected]> skrev...
    > "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Please god no - that's why I posted on a 'bent group and not a general cycling group. I have
    > searched and not really found and answer to this
    > - that's all.

    http://groups.google.com/groups?as_q=climb&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_ugroup=alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent-
    &lr=&hl=da

    (link might need assembly) 3600 hits on "climb" from this newsgroup.

    Heres the Google advanced search page http://groups.google.com/advanced_group_search?

    Just put in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and you won't get hits from heathen DF groups. (You might get
    my danish page but it comes in english too)

    M.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I have searched and not really found and answer to this
    > - that's all.

    A few opinions:

    * Yes, you can press more than your weight with your legs in the recumbent position. Do it very
    long, though, and you'll blow out your knees.

    * Even if you don't blow out your knees, I don't think you can maintain that 240lb press pace for
    very long. Whereas it's comparatively less effort to jump up on the pedal and ride gravity down,
    which is why competitive bikers do it.

    * Most (NOT all) bents are significantly heavier than most (NOT all) upright bikes. (Due to many
    reasons that vary by bike, but including longer chain, larger heavier seat, etc.) That weight
    translates directly into increased effort required to haul the bike up the hill.

    Certainly it's possible for bents to beat uprights going uphill. But I think it takes a
    better-conditioned rider to push *most* bents uphill than it does to push *most* uprights uphill.

    Gary
     
  7. reply

    reply Guest

    Yes - all true

    I've done a load of reading which always came down to the "bent riders can't stand" this got me
    wondering if I was unusual in the amount of weight I can leg press and if that would make a
    difference. I used to ice skate 6 or so hours a day along with about 30 miles on a bike each day so
    may have different muscle build than a "normal" bike rider.

    That was all.

    Everso

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> skrev...
    >> "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Please god no - that's why I posted on a 'bent group and not a general cycling group. I have
    >> searched and not really found and answer to this
    >> - that's all.
    >
    >
    >http://groups.google.com/groups?as_q=climb&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_ugroup=alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent&-
    >lr=&hl=da
    >
    >(link might need assembly) 3600 hits on "climb" from this newsgroup.
    >
    >Heres the Google advanced search page http://groups.google.com/advanced_group_search?
    >
    >Just put in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and you won't get hits from heathen DF groups. (You might
    >get my danish page but it comes in english too)
    >
    >M.
     
  8. reply

    reply Guest

    That makes sense. Thanks

    Now I'll shut up in the hope that this thread will die and not de-generate into an undignified
    shouting match

    Everso

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> I have searched and not really found and answer to this
    >> - that's all.
    >
    >A few opinions:
    >
    >* Yes, you can press more than your weight with your legs in the recumbent position. Do it very
    > long, though, and you'll blow out your knees.
    >
    >* Even if you don't blow out your knees, I don't think you can maintain that 240lb press pace for
    > very long. Whereas it's comparatively less effort to jump up on the pedal and ride gravity down,
    > which is why competitive bikers do it.
    >
    >* Most (NOT all) bents are significantly heavier than most (NOT all) upright bikes. (Due to many
    > reasons that vary by bike, but including longer chain, larger heavier seat, etc.) That weight
    > translates directly into increased effort required to haul the bike up the hill.
    >
    >Certainly it's possible for bents to beat uprights going uphill. But I think it takes a
    >better-conditioned rider to push *most* bents uphill than it does to push *most* uprights uphill.
    >
    >Gary
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > That makes sense. Thanks
    >
    > Now I'll shut up in the hope that this thread will die and not de-generate into an undignified
    > shouting match.

    THAT would NEVER happen here on a.r.b.r. ;)

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    Arguing with an engineer is like mud wrestling with a pig... You soon find out the pig likes
    it! - Unknown
     
  10. "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in messagede...
    >
    > <> Just put in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and you won't get hits from heathen
    DF groups.

    There you guys go again, staking the deck in your favour.

    Do a search for posts by Jon Issac on this subject for the real answer.

    I wish there was some way I could demonstrate to you just how powerfully a top cyclist like me can
    climb, it would blow you away!

    ( this post was NOT spell checked )
     
  11. JetLegs

    JetLegs New Member

    Joined:
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    Originally posted by Fabrizio Mazzol
    "I wish there was some way I could demonstrate to you just how powerfully a top cyclist like me can climb.."

    BoBo the circus monkey can climb the high wire while on a unicycle. Something you can never accomplish Fab. That makes BoBo much stronger than you and a superior climber.

    You should go eat a banana Fab. Perhaps one day you will be almost as strong as BoBo the circus chimp.

    Maybe not.

    JetLegs
     
  12. Tom Thompson

    Tom Thompson Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in messagede...
    > >
    > > <> Just put in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and you won't get hits from
    heathen
    > DF groups.
    >
    > There you guys go again, staking the deck in your favour.
    >
    > Do a search for posts by Jon Issac on this subject for the real answer.
    >
    > I wish there was some way I could demonstrate to you just how powerfully a top cyclist like me can
    > climb, it would blow you away!
    >
    Mt. Washington 1975. ~90 mins. 18 yrs old, 120#. Raliegh Gran Prix with 14-28 5 speed freewheel.
    Been there done that.

    Tom Thompson
     
  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    >
    > "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in messagede...
    > >
    > > <> Just put in alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and you won't get hits from heathen
    > DF groups.
    >
    > There you guys go again, staking the deck in your favour.
    >
    > Do a search for posts by Jon Issac on this subject for the real answer....

    This would be the Jon Isaacs who has never ridden a recumbent bicycle but knows all about them from
    observing others ride them. His opinions on recumbent bicycles should be considered with this
    background in mind.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  14. "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > This would be the Jon Isaacs who has never ridden a recumbent bicycle
    > but knows all about them from observing others ride them. His opinions on recumbent bicycles
    > should be considered with this background in mind.

    Tom, I would listen to what Jon has to say if I were you, after all ol Jon went to college or
    something and I think he reads books all the time.
     
  15. news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > I have searched and not really found and answer to this
    > > - that's all.
    >
    > A few opinions:
    >
    > * Yes, you can press more than your weight with your legs in the
    recumbent
    > position. Do it very long, though, and you'll blow out your knees.
    >
    > * Even if you don't blow out your knees, I don't think you can maintain that 240lb press pace for
    > very long. Whereas it's comparatively less effort to jump up on the pedal and ride gravity down,
    > which is why competitive bikers do it.
    >
    > * Most (NOT all) bents are significantly heavier than most (NOT all) upright bikes. (Due to many
    > reasons that vary by bike, but including longer chain, larger heavier seat, etc.) That weight
    > translates directly into increased effort required to haul the bike up the hill.
    >
    > Certainly it's possible for bents to beat uprights going uphill. But I think it takes a
    > better-conditioned rider to push *most* bents uphill
    than
    > it does to push *most* uprights uphill.
    >

    My experience is contrary. I can climb considerably faster on my upright than on my recumbent even
    when I remain seated and spin (and I'm not exactly slow on the recumbent). Even when I am
    consciously not putting any pressure on the handlebar. For me, uprights climb faster.
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Certainly it's possible for bents to beat uprights going uphill. But I think it takes a
    >> better-conditioned rider to push *most* bents uphill than it does to push *most* uprights uphill.
    >
    > My experience is contrary. I can climb considerably faster on my upright than on my recumbent even
    > when I remain seated and spin

    How is that contrary? I said it's **possible** for bents to beat uprights, but in most cases the
    upright will be faster due to weight, etc.

    (And even if it WAS contrary to what I said, an individual anecdote does not invalidate a general
    statement. "Most men are less than seven feet tall" is not false because of a few NBA stars. There
    are exceptions to every rule.)

    Gary
     
  17. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Guest

    On Mon, 7 Jul 2003 16:01:15 -0700, "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >

    >>
    >
    >My experience is contrary. I can climb considerably faster on my upright than on my recumbent even
    >when I remain seated and spin (and I'm not exactly slow on the recumbent). Even when I am
    >consciously not putting any pressure on the handlebar. For me, uprights climb faster.
    >
    >

    I do both as well and concur
     
  18. Ian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BB2E486C.8767%[email protected]>...
    > Mikael Seierup must be edykated coz e writed:
    >
    > > *does the cross thing with fingers*
    > >
    > > Not another bents can/can't climb thread. :)
    > >
    > > Try searching on Google for this and you will get lots of hits and rehashed arguments.
    > >
    > > Mikael
    > >
    > Yep another one, I'll let all the non "benters" into a little secret, recumbents use a different
    > muscle set, after a while you can climb as well as a wedgie, sometimes a little slower, sometimes
    > a little faster, every week I usually pass a certain MTB rider locally on a long hill, everytime
    > he tries to race me, everytime he loses, he did once say the immortal words "I thought those
    > things couldn't do hills", and he is a competitive club rider. I was passed by a hybrid the other
    > day on the flat, I then passed him climbing a hill, at a junction at the top, he caught up then
    > pedalled hard down the other side, and was dismayed as I free wheeled past him, and that was on a
    > 9 speed Delta trike.
    >
    > Ian

    Hello Guys.. I just gave up trying to explain why I go up hills a little slower.Just let em stare as
    they puff away!!! :p Dave P Bike-E and several homebuilts
     
  19. Skip

    Skip Guest

    <Dave Miller> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 7 Jul 2003 16:01:15 -0700, "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > >>
    > >
    > >My experience is contrary. I can climb considerably faster on my upright than on my recumbent
    > >even when I remain seated and spin (and I'm not exactly slow on the recumbent). Even when I am
    > >consciously not putting
    any
    > >pressure on the handlebar. For me, uprights climb faster.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I do both as well and concur

    I think most folks who ride both would probably agree. As far as the stand up pedal strokes are
    concerned each DF rider has a daily allotment of them. DF riders need to sit and spin too and use
    their allotment of stand up strokes wisely.

    skip
     
  20. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    If we are going to give this subject another ride, how about at least adding some additional
    information; say, for example, rider size and weight. I wouldn't be surprised if the upright bike
    hill climbing advantage over a recumbent was greater for small, light people than for larger,
    heavier people.

    Smaller people have a good power to weight ratio, but often don't have that much total power, so
    they may not get far pushing into the seat and muscleing. OTOH some larger people can put out quite
    a bit of power - more than lighter people - so with proper training, they may be able to minimize
    the difference between bike styles.

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
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