It sounds like the ultra torque tic, but i have power torque.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gnufrau, May 15, 2016.

  1. Gnufrau

    Gnufrau Active Member

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    Is this likely? Also I only have about 700km on the bottom bracket? If more info is needed, just ask.

    Groupset: Campagnolo Athena 11 speed Tripple.
    Bottom Bracket: Power Torque English Threading.
    Primary use: Sport touring/light touring
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Oh shit...now you done gone and did it.

    http://www.campagnolo.com/media/fil..._torque_athena_Campagnolo_08_2012 - Copia.pdf

    Manual shown is for the double 2x11. I'm assuming the triple uses an identical BB assembly.

    PowerTorque, like UltraTorque, relies on a wave washer to apply an end play pre-load. In the case of PowerTorque it is located behind the left crank arm in a polymer seal. It may not be generating enough reduction in crank spindle endplay and the side-to-side movement of the crank assembly within the bearings is causing your clicking / ticking noise.

    'IF' you have eliminated all other sources of the noise by checking pedal mounting tightness and greasing their threads, bearing cups are tight, cleats are not the source of the noise, etc., you might want to look at adding a shim or shims to your bottom bracket and / or crank spindle to reduce the end play in the spindle.

    Shims can be added behind the left cup and shims can be added odd the spindle. The location on the spindle should tandem them with the wave washer so that they do not damage the seal.

    After installing the shims and tightening the left side arm's retaining screw check for excessive drag by rotating the crankset with no chain on the rings. Adding shims will likely increase the drag felt a little bit, but it need not be excessive to eliminate the noise. There is a 'sweet spot' to shoot for and it may require a couple of crank tear downs and adding or removing of shims to find the shim thickness that is Goldilocks 'just right' to eliminate the noise and not induce too much drag.

    The old style freewheel shims sometimes found in 'old timey' bike shops will work and are available in very small thickness increments for fine tuning the shim thickness. Hope Racing and others manufacture the shims that are placed behind the bearing cups (in between the bearing cups and the frame).
     
  3. Gnufrau

    Gnufrau Active Member

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    U
    Umm, there's also a clip that goes on the drive side that eliminates side movement of the chainset. This clip is shown in step 9 of the installation pictograms. Does this fix eliminate that clip?
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    The clip on the right side serves to retain the bearing in the cup during assembly / disassembly of the crankset. i.e. you can push on the left side splines without pushing the right side crank arm and spindle out of the cup.

    Once assembled it prevents the bearing from walking outboard with the spindle 'if' there is too much end play in the assembly. If the crankset is preloaded lightly or shimmed to exactly zero preload with it serves no purpose. It is not the source of the noise, however, and might as well remain in place.

    I keep the retainer clip in place on all my bikes and they are perfectly silent once shimmed to eliminate the clicking / ticking noise.
     
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