ITBS - pain outside knee - how long should I take off?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Mr. Mark, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Mr. Mark

    Mr. Mark Guest

    I am in month 3 of marathon training. I originally felt pain on outside of my left knee after a
    speed workout on Tuesday. It lasted a few hours. Then on Thursday, after my run, I felt the pain
    again, this time it lasted rest of day, but went away. Then, on Saturday, I did a 10 mile run, I
    started feeling some pain at mile 7 (not that painful). But when I was done, the pain was pretty bad
    (could be barely bend knee). I iced my knee off an on on Saturday, and did some stretches, and took
    IB. This morning (Sunday), it feels a little better, but I can feel it.

    I have read up on ITBS, and I'm not sure how serious my case is. Can I just take a few days to a
    week off, and do the stretches and ice and be OK? I have a 12 mile run next Saturday.

    Thanks, Mark
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Mr. Mark
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am in month 3 of marathon training. I originally felt pain on outside of my left knee after a
    > speed workout on Tuesday. It lasted a few hours. Then on Thursday, after my run, I felt the pain
    > again, this time it lasted rest of day, but went away. Then, on Saturday, I did a 10 mile run, I
    > started feeling some pain at mile 7 (not that painful). But when I was done, the pain was pretty
    > bad (could be barely bend knee). I iced my knee off an on on Saturday, and did some stretches, and
    > took IB. This morning (Sunday), it feels a little better, but I can feel it.
    >
    > I have read up on ITBS, and I'm not sure how serious my case is. Can I just take a few days to a
    > week off, and do the stretches and ice and be OK? I have a 12 mile run next Saturday.
    >
    > Thanks, Mark

    Mark,

    Check out rolling the ITB and quads: www.mindfulness.com/of5.asp

    You're dealing with loosening the fascia around the IT Band and also rolling out the quads will take
    pressure off.

    Also sit on a tennis ball and find the area around the tensor fascia lata which if y ou can release
    the knot in that area you'll also reduce the pull on the IT Band.

    In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang Maintainer - rec.running FAQ Director, San Diego Marathon
    Clinic, est. 1975

    Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
     
  3. Onemarathon

    Onemarathon Guest

    In article <140920030722530280%[email protected]>, Ozzie Gontang
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Mr. Mark
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I am in month 3 of marathon training. I originally felt pain on outside of my left knee after a
    > > speed workout on Tuesday. It lasted a few hours. Then on Thursday, after my run, I felt the pain
    > > again, this time it lasted rest of day, but went away. Then, on Saturday, I did a 10 mile run, I
    > > started feeling some pain at mile 7 (not that painful). But when I was done, the pain was pretty
    > > bad (could be barely bend knee). I iced my knee off an on on Saturday, and did some stretches,
    > > and took IB. This morning (Sunday), it feels a little better, but I can feel it.
    > >
    > > I have read up on ITBS, and I'm not sure how serious my case is. Can I just take a few days to a
    > > week off, and do the stretches and ice and be OK? I have a 12 mile run next Saturday.
    > >
    > > Thanks, Mark
    >
    >
    > Mark,
    >
    > Check out rolling the ITB and quads: www.mindfulness.com/of5.asp
    >
    > You're dealing with loosening the fascia around the IT Band and also rolling out the quads will
    > take pressure off.
    >
    > Also sit on a tennis ball and find the area around the tensor fascia lata which if y ou can
    > release the knot in that area you'll also reduce the pull on the IT Band.

    > In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang

    yes, do these things. respect what the IT Band can do to hurt you! i've been there, and i'm even
    feeling a little reminder of those woes these days... been doing a couple of things out of the
    ordinary: hill workouts, and running on concrete a little more than i usually do. must stay off the
    sidewalks!

    best of luck,

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
  4. sam_glasser

    sam_glasser New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
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    Hi mate,

    ITB syndrome.....what a nightmare!!

    I have been resting now for 3 months. The last time I had it It took 1 month and a huge physio therapy bill!

    Stupidly I did not carry on with the advice I had paid for, and it has returned once more.

    One piece of advice which I would give you is to take up Yoga. I always thought it would never be for me but I have been proved wrong. And it has made me realize just how inflexible I was and still am to some extent.

    I have spent a long time reading material on this problem and how to cure it. For me, I have realized that not only is it caused by the muscles being too tight, but also not strong enough. Having never done ANY weights on my legs (just hours of pounding the streets!) I thought I would give it a go. My hamstrings are just so weak, my girlfriend can lift heavier than me!! My gluets are also in the same situation.

    I am currently trying to bring running back in to my training schedule to test the water. Just 5 minutes at a time. So far it feels ok, I'm just hoping it will hold out on a longer run!

    Although I have taken quite some time to make improvements, be stricked with your recovery strategy and I'm sure you'll heal sooner!

    Good luck, and stick with it.
    Cheers.




     
  5. On 14 Sep 2003 06:38:12 -0700, Mr. Mark wrote:

    >I have read up on ITBS, and I'm not sure how serious my case is. Can I just take a few days to a
    >week off, and do the stretches and ice and be OK? I have a 12 mile run next Saturday.
    >
    Hi, Mark,

    I hope you get it worked out. In addition to Ozzie's good suggestions, I would also suggest that you
    take a look for what may have caused it otherwise it will just return. Some of the simpler things to
    check are shoes (yeah, you knew that was coming - also check your everyday shoes for worn soles),
    running surface (always running on a road canted down to the left can cause problems for some
    people), office/home chair that's tilted, ... Of course, there are other reasons for a sore knee and
    some of the causes aren't so simple but this is a place to start.

    Good luck, Layne

    -------------------------------------------------------
    The rec.running report archives may be found at http://kinder.cis.unf.edu/rec.running
     
  6. Onemarathon

    Onemarathon Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, sam_glasser <[email protected]> wrote:

    > One piece of advice which I would give you is to take up Yoga. I always thought it would never be
    > for me but I have been proved wrong. And it has made me realize just how inflexible I was and
    > still am to some extent.
    >
    > I have spent a long time reading material on this problem and how to cure it. For me, I have
    > realized that not only is it caused by the muscles being too tight, but also not strong enough.
    > Having never done ANY weights on my legs (just hours of pounding the streets!) I thought I would
    > give it a go. My hamstrings are just so weak, my girlfriend can lift heavier than me!! My gluets
    > are also in the same situation.
    >
    > I am currently trying to bring running back in to my training schedule to test the water. Just 5
    > minutes at a time. So far it feels ok, I'm just hoping it will hold out on a longer run!
    >
    > Although I have taken quite some time to make improvements, be stricked with your recovery
    > strategy and I'm sure you'll heal sooner!
    >
    > Good luck, and stick with it. Cheers.

    i can relate to the ITBS probs. once you get it, you deal with it for the rest of your life,
    apparently. or so i am experiencing. keeping the muscles loose, maintaining good form, and running
    in well-cushioned shoes are key. i'd like to know if strength training for the legs has been proven
    to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of ITBS. i'd be willing to give it a go if that's the answer.

    so the flexibility that comes with yoga practice helps too?

    i'm open to hearing anyone's success stories in overcoming ITBS.

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
  7. Mrtwister

    Mrtwister Guest

    I had ITBS several years ago. It seemed to take 3 months to correct itself. Try to run. If it begins
    to hurt, take off more time.

    I stretch my IT band now before and after I run. I assume it helps since I haven't had a
    reoccurrence. Sitting on the ground with one leg extended, cross the other bent leg across the
    first. Wrap your arm around your knee and pull the bent leg toward your chest. Repeat with other
    leg. Hope this helps.
     
  8. Onemarathon

    Onemarathon Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (MrTwister) wrote:

    > I had ITBS several years ago. It seemed to take 3 months to correct itself. Try to run. If it
    > begins to hurt, take off more time.
    >
    > I stretch my IT band now before and after I run. I assume it helps since I haven't had a
    > reoccurrence. Sitting on the ground with one leg extended, cross the other bent leg across the
    > first. Wrap your arm around your knee and pull the bent leg toward your chest. Repeat with other
    > leg. Hope this helps.

    now that's a neat, yet simple, ITB stretch. didn't know that one, though i know of a few others.

    thanks for mentioning that,

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
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