Itbs

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by John Wilkins, Jun 13, 2003.

  1. John Wilkins

    John Wilkins New Member

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    Does anyone have any advice with regard to Iliotibia band syndrome. I have only this week started riding again, 5 miles twice a week after a two month lay off.
    My physio, after 5 treatments, suggested I build up the mileage slowly, extra couple of miles per week over the forthcoming months.
    The pain has not completely subsided and I have reservations about returning to the same physio.
     
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  2. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    John:

    Bummer about your ITB problem. Taking 2 months off is very bad for your form. I've had my share of ITB problems over the years. If you wait for the pain to go away for a given injury, you will never ride again.

    Get a trainer if you don't already have one so you can ride when injured. Go easy to start, gradually do more in terms of duration and intensity. Try something like 20-30 minutes real easy 3-4 times a week to start. Back off if the pain gets worse.

    How is your saddle height??? If you are too low, it will force your legs into a bow-legged situation, and place more load on the ITB as it passes over the lateral femoral condyle in the knee. Raise you saddle a little and see if it feels better.

    Do you have a leg-length discrepancy??? My left leg is the short one and the one with all the problems. The shorter leg has to work harder to keep up with the longer leg. Sit on a floor with your back to a wall. Bend both knees so your feet are flat on the floor. Bring the knees fairly close to your chest. With both knees together, which kneecap is taller??? Place a ruler on top of your knees to see the gap. To correct, place a "shim" under the heel of your short leg. Something like a folded up paper towel(s) under an insole/orthodic works well.

    Are you using fixed cleats??? If so they may not be adjusted properly. Consider buying pedals that "float."

    If your legs are weak, it can make the problem worse also. Try doing isolated leg training (ILT). It will do wonders for your knee problems, and make you a stronger rider. I have posted extensively about the benefits of ILT for some time now in the "training" area of this board. Seriously, ILT may be one of the best ways to prevent/heal knee injuries. ILT will make you a much more durable athlete.

    The knees are the most important part of a rider's body. Pamper your knees at all times. This means proper warm up and proper cool down, knee warmers below 70 degrees, and no extra activities that are hard on the knees like running, soccer, basketball, etc.

    Also, make sure you are flexible from the hips down. Good flexibility in the hip flexors and thigh are very important to staving off this type of injury.

    Try some of this, especially the ILT and see if it helps with your problem.

    Good luck!!!
     
  3. MidBunchLurker

    MidBunchLurker New Member

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    A good ITBS resource is http://www.itbs.info/ Its mainly written from the point of view of runners, but the links and explanations are really good. I found some excellent stretches and strengthening exercises there.

    I've just recovered from light ITBS myself, and the last thing you want to do is stop riding completely! I just did very light 1 hour sessions (2x a week), with twice daily stretches and daily strengthening exercises for the gluteus medius. I also raised my saddle by 5mm and presto!! 2 weeks and it was gone!

    Try the self-help route before visiting the physio again. Good luck!
     
  4. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    MidBunchLurker:

    Thanks for the input. It always helps to hear from others who have successfully dealt with their injuries. Riders can often "fix" themselves, we just have to outsmart our problems!!!

    Stay healthy!!!
     
  5. Jhikers

    Jhikers New Member

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  6. SteveCan

    SteveCan New Member

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    I also recently overcame ITBS as a triathlete.

    First of all a visit to a good Osteopath was critical. There is a lot of talk about what 'causes' ITB, but something that I don't see mentioned often is that while ITB is generally agreed to be caused by having tightness in the band - isn't it strange that the vast majority of cases only occur in one leg?

    This indicates that the problem is at least partially caused by an imbalance in the body. In my case the hips were slightly out of alignment. A simple corrective trreatment from the osteo, some sensible stretching and a recovery program and I am back to fighting fit.

    I had a mild case and obviously everyone is different - the point I would like to make is - check your body is in balance first - otherwise all the stretching in the world is not going to fix the problem. Can anyone say 'Chronic ITB'???

    Cheers
    Steve
     
  7. Randybaker99

    Randybaker99 New Member

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    I also overcame knee pain by raising my seat. I had done a Fit
    Kit with my LBS before I bought a new bike there and the seat height was recommended to be 93 cm. When I got the bike from them, I foolishly neglected to check the seat height against the fitting - I guess I assumed they had checked it. Then I started having knee pain after a few hundred miles - not ITBS, but something similar with a calf tendon (lower - behind and under the top of the tibia). I tried a bunch of different things without much success. Finally I got out a tape measure and sure enough the seat was about 1/2 inch lower than the fit kit recommended height. I am doing much better now and gradually ramping up the mileage again.

    I hope your problems get resolved soon!
     
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