Jack Daniels' "Running Formula"

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by kmavm, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. kmavm

    kmavm New Member

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    I know, we're not runners. (Well, I kind of am now, but that's neither here nor there.) This is one of the best books on endurance training I've ever read. A lot of the nuts and bolts about what workouts target what systems lines up very closely with the current thinking of the wattage-list crowd, although his season-wide vision is more conventionally "periodised" than the "go-hard-or-go-home" approach popular here. Still, the book reads a lot like the usual literature about power meters. He is very cautious about the bogosity of heart rate, he preferring target paces set from a known reference pace. Ahh, to compete in a sport where a stopwatch works pretty well as a power meter... He also has a TSS-esque weighted intensity that produces a sort of "normalized easy miles per week" metric for training volume.

    One of the nicer explanations in the book is his breakdown on the difference between what we'd consider L7 and L6 (he kinda treats L6 and L5 similarly, to my way of thinking). He describes the former as "fast", and the latter as "hard." This gets to an interesting property of L7 workouts that I've always struggled to communicate: while they're more "intense" than L5/L6 in the sense of involving higher power outputs (or higher speeds if running), they don't require anywhere near as much mental energy to execute successfully. Even though they're "fast," they're not "hard." So, somewhat like Carmichael, his athletes' "base" involves piles of highL2/lowL3 mixed in with almost daily L7. This may make more sense in running, where substantial technical and structural improvements to economy are possible via L7, but I still think the idea of "getting used to going fast" might be valuable to cyclists as well, if only psychologically.

    Any other good training literature from other sports? All you SST types would get a kick out of Lydiard...
     
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  2. SolarEnergy

    SolarEnergy New Member

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    I ordered my copy of the Running Formula recently. It's a great book indeed.

    His Running Formula was my main motivation to order the book. His VDOT table is based on this formula, which incidently can be adapted to swimming as well.

    My training bible have been (and still is) "Theory and Methodology of Training" by Tudor Bomba. Most of what's writen in this book is still true today. In fact, I own the mid-80's edition, but I plan to purchase his latest edition (1999). Can we coach without having read Bompa?

    And my favorite training book has to be Swimming Faster, (all 3 editions) by Ernest Maglischo's swim training books. Frankly I don't know where he could find the time, motivation and passion to write this one (knowing that he probably makes 20 000 x 0.30$ out of it). This book is over 700 page long, 8 1/2 by 11in. 380 pages on physiology and planning. The complete energy pathway is described, starting from the sun (which supply all the energy used to cycle, breathe and live) and scaning the main energy metabolisms broken down in chemical steps (Kreb Cycle, anaerobic metabolism, electron transport chain).
     
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