Jeanson...oops

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Crank Yanker, Oct 11, 2003.

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  1. Crank Yanker

    Crank Yanker Guest

    > Just exactly what dope would she be on that has such a marked effect, yet doesn't result in a
    > positive test?

    The drug would be called EPO. The fact that she's only being tested for EPO because her hematocrit
    is above the limit suggests that it is pretty rare for women's events to test for EPO (and the test
    is only a couple of years old). I imagine because it cost alot.

    > If anything, all this means is Jeanson's people should have sought a waiver for a high hematocrit
    > like Vaughters did. Outside of that, it means nothing else.

    Dumbass, Vaughter's gets a waiver because he's demonstrated that it is normal for his hematocrit to
    be above 50%. Has Jeanson done the same?

    Between this and your statistics posts, I think you might be retarded.

    P.S. Wasn't there a story a few months back about a Montreal MD that was being investigated for
    doping female cyclists? Anybody heard more about this?
     
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  2. Racer X

    Racer X Guest

    Yes, you are correct Crank, Jeanson is on EPO. She's been on EPO for the past 3 years, 12 months out
    of the year. What other possible explanation could there be

    dick).

    Just like the one Vaughters lives in at the top of his mountain in Colorado. Quite frankly, I don't
    see what the real difference is between Vaughters and Jeanson's hematocrit situation other than the
    UCI is overly-impressed with doctor's notes (based upon the numerous asthma exemptions, they
    apparently are).

    When Jeanson's EPO test comes back negative next week, all you Americans are gonna cry like a baby
    with a dirty diaper.

    and turned it into an ice rink.

    And we'll do it again.

    Racer X

    Crank Yanker wrote:

    > > Just exactly what dope would she be on that has such a marked effect, yet doesn't result in a
    > > positive test?
    >
    > The drug would be called EPO. The fact that she's only being tested for EPO because her hematocrit
    > is above the limit suggests that it is pretty rare for women's events to test for EPO (and the
    > test is only a couple of years old). I imagine because it cost alot.
    >
    > > If anything, all this means is Jeanson's people should have sought a waiver for a high
    > > hematocrit like Vaughters did. Outside of that, it means nothing else.
    >
    > Dumbass, Vaughter's gets a waiver because he's demonstrated that it is normal for his hematocrit
    > to be above 50%. Has Jeanson done the same?
    >
    > Between this and your statistics posts, I think you might be retarded.
    >
    > P.S. Wasn't there a story a few months back about a Montreal MD that was being investigated for
    > doping female cyclists? Anybody heard more about this?
     
  3. "RACER X" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >

    time
    > and turned it into an ice rink.

    Dumbass -

    Canadians are incapable of taking EPO?

    http://www.canadiancyclist.com/dailynews/February/2.5.034.30PM27.shtml

    Quebec Doctor and Athletes Subject of Investigation

    According to an article published in today's edition of La Press this morning a Quebec doctor is
    under investigation for administering EPO to a number of athletes (11 in total) including cyclists.
    The matter was brought to the attention of the FQSC by a cyclist who had been offered the banned
    substance by the doctor.

    Incidents under investigation occurred in the years 1998 to 2001.

    The information was also reported by CBC's french language broadcaster, Radio-Canada.

    Names of the athletes have not been revealed, and all information pertaining to the investigation is
    being withheld, prior to a decision being reached on February 12th. The case is being heard from
    February 24 to 28th.
     
  4. Crank Yanker

    Crank Yanker Guest

    RACER X <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Yes, you are correct Crank, Jeanson is on EPO. She's been on EPO for the past 3 years, 12 months
    > out of the year. What other possible explanation could there be

    > dick).

    Retard,

    Not only is your understanding of statistics and bike racing off, your reading comprehesion leaves
    something to be desired also. I never said I thought she was on EPO. In fact, I don't think she is,
    despite the circumstantial evidence.
     
  5. Squidvark

    Squidvark Guest

    RACER X <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just like the one Vaughters lives in at the top of his mountain in Colorado. Quite frankly, I don't
    >see what the real difference is between Vaughters and Jeanson's hematocrit situation other than the
    >UCI is overly-impressed with doctor's notes (based upon the numerous asthma exemptions, they
    >apparently are).

    You don't get a waiver for living at altitude or using the tent. Some people have naturally high HCT
    due to higher levels of endogenous EPO or perhaps other reasons. Vaughters could be one of those. In
    Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, it's mentioned that these people have a natural advantage in
    endurance sports. However, to get a waiver you would likely need medical records going back to your
    childhood to demonstrate that these HCT levels are normal for you.
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Guest

    The problem is Racer X is a conspiracy theorist. Everything is useless blather. He also can't seem
    to get past his infatuation with Vaughters. If he were half as intelligent as he claims to be he'd
    know that there are individuals who have naturally high Hct's; this was one of the original
    arguments against using the Hct cut-off, which is why we have the waiver.

    I've come to realize the guy knows little about anything, and a little knowledge can be dangerous.

    CH

    Squidvark <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > RACER X <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Just like the one Vaughters lives in at the top of his mountain in Colorado. Quite frankly, I
    > >don't see what the real difference is between Vaughters and Jeanson's hematocrit situation other
    > >than the UCI is overly-impressed with doctor's notes (based upon the numerous asthma exemptions,
    > >they apparently are).
    >
    > You don't get a waiver for living at altitude or using the tent. Some people have naturally high
    > HCT due to higher levels of endogenous EPO or perhaps other reasons. Vaughters could be one of
    > those. In Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, it's mentioned that these people have a natural
    > advantage in endurance sports. However, to get a waiver you would likely need medical records
    > going back to your childhood to demonstrate that these HCT levels are normal for you.
     
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