Jerseys for Big, Tall, & Heavy Riders

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Example.Com, Jun 25, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Example.Com

    Example.Com Guest

    SO I want to buy one of those TEAM Jerseys. It seems that XXL is equal to a size 45 (chest, or maybe
    as big as 49"). I need a Double or Triple X American (52-56" Chest) and it'd be real nice if it was
    a TALL also. Any place to buy this stuff in these sizes? or who actually MANUFACTURERS this stuff so
    Companies (nashbar, Performance, Precaryous, etc) can put their LABEL on it??
     
    Tags:


  2. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    somebody wrote:

    > It seems that XXL is equal to a size 45 (chest, or maybe as big as 49"). I need a Double or Triple
    > X American (52-56" Chest) and it'd be real nice if it was a TALL also. Any place to buy this stuff
    > in these sizes? or who actually MANUFACTURERS this stuff so Companies (nashbar, Performance,
    > Precaryous, etc) can put their LABEL on it??

    Man, don't get took! Those things are foolish and homely even on Olympian physiques. And they're
    expensive and plasticky to boot.

    Your superior size is helping you to choose the righteous path and maintain your dignity by riding
    in an appropriate shirt for the purpose: a 100% cotton t-shirt (with nothing printed on it).

    Chalo Colina 4XLT
     
  3. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    muscle, no fat, I assure you ;-) ) and I was able to find sizes there (ebay) that I could not find
    anywhere else.

    P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.

    "example.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > SO I want to buy one of those TEAM Jerseys. It seems that XXL is equal to a size 45 (chest, or
    > maybe as big as 49"). I need a Double or Triple X American (52-56" Chest) and it'd be real nice if
    > it was a TALL also. Any place to buy this stuff in these sizes? or who actually MANUFACTURERS this
    > stuff so Companies (nashbar, Performance, Precaryous, etc) can put their LABEL on it??
     
  4. >P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    > day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.

    Whilst I wouldn't suggest that cotton has turned into a genetically modified, rabid, man-eating
    fabric, these days there are fabrics which are a lot better than cotton for when you exercise.
    Coolmax is one example, there are others.

    Cheers, helen s :)

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h$**$*$el$**e$n$**$d$**$o$*$t**$$s$**$im$mo$ns*@a$**o$l.c$$*o$*m*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  5. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On 26 Jun 2003 20:22:44 GMT, wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    >> day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.
    >
    > Whilst I wouldn't suggest that cotton has turned into a genetically modified, rabid, man-eating
    > fabric, these days there are fabrics which are a lot better than cotton for when you exercise.
    > Coolmax is one example, there are others.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s :)
    >
    > ~~~~~~~~~~
    > This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    > h$**$*$el$**e$n$**$d$**$o$*$t**$$s$**$im$mo$ns*@a$**o$l.c$$*o$*m*$ by getting rid of the
    > overdependence on money and fame
    > ~~~~~~~~~~
    >

    While I agree that there are fabrics that are better than cotton, I've worn a lot of cotton during
    rides in AZ, and I'm still alive and kicking. I still wear cotton in CT. Sure, it gets wet and never
    dries, but there's the fun of it -- a nice wet shirt next your body, making it work harder.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  6. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] (Appkiller) wrote:

    > P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    > day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.

    I lived most of my life, and most of my cycling miles, in central Texas. Oftentimes each summer it
    can go two months at a stretch before a day the temperature _doesn't_ reach 100F. I have ridden
    literally tens of thousands of miles in such conditions.

    I always wore a cotton shirt. Soaking it periodically with water (and keeping moving) was the best
    way to stay relatively cool. No plastic shirt will hold moisture long enough for this effect to be
    worthwhile.

    Under sweaty conditions like that, plastic shirts also develop a deep-seated stink that
    won't wash out.

    And they're expensive and foolish-looking.

    Chalo Colina
     
  7. On 26 Jun 2003 12:36:18 -0700, [email protected] (Appkiller) wrote:

    >P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    > day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.

    Googling it up, every one of the "cotton kills" references I find refer very specifically to COLD
    days, not warm. Specifically, to the fact that when wet (with sweat or rain) and cold/windy, you go
    into hypothermia easily. In hot conditions, on the other hand, when the trick is not so much to stay
    warm but to cool off as much as possible, cotton should be the most suitable rather than the least.
    Not terribly scientific study there suggests that cotton cools you off even more than going naked:

    http://www.losalamos.org/lasar/lafb/cotton_kills.htm

    Jasper
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I always wore a cotton shirt. Soaking it periodically with water (and keeping moving) was the best
    > way to stay relatively cool. No plastic shirt will hold moisture long enough for this effect to be
    > worthwhile.

    Depends on the humidity. In dry enough heat, cotton is more comfortable, but as soon as evaporation
    rate falls behind sweat rate, it gets less comfortable than the better synthetics.

    > And they're expensive and foolish-looking.

    Yeah, but you can get Coolmax Alta t-shirts for $10 or so, look just like cotton, work much better
    in high humidity.
     
  9. F. Golightly

    F. Golightly Guest

    "example.com" <[email protected]>
    > SO I want to buy one of those TEAM Jerseys.

    Try --- > www.queergear.com

    hth
     
  10. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    Yeah, and the whole time you are soaking wet and miserable (at least I was when I wore cotton when
    it was hot). I know that the saying is actually referencing cold weather, but I would bet that the
    "cooling" provided by cotton in hot weather is minimal when compared to something like, say, a
    cool-max t-shirt that doesn't "look stupid".

    There are many technical fabric options infinitely better (i.e. more comfortable) than cotton for
    sweat management that are not cycling jerseys per se. If chalo wants to stew in his own sweat, that
    is fine with me, but I prefer to stay dry.

    Look into MTB jerseys or cool-max tees. Outlets like Sierra Trading Post will sell you one for under
    $10 and I will guarantee (in a rhetorical sense) that you will find them infinitely more comfortable
    than cotton.

    App

    Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 26 Jun 2003 12:36:18 -0700, [email protected] (Appkiller) wrote:
    >
    > >P.S.: Don't wear cotton. As the old saying goes, "Cotton kills". Go for a ride on a 100 degree F
    > > day with cotton on and you will know what they meant.
    >
    > Googling it up, every one of the "cotton kills" references I find refer very specifically to COLD
    > days, not warm. Specifically, to the fact that when wet (with sweat or rain) and cold/windy, you
    > go into hypothermia easily. In hot conditions, on the other hand, when the trick is not so much
    > to stay warm but to cool off as much as possible, cotton should be the most suitable rather than
    > the least. Not terribly scientific study there suggests that cotton cools you off even more than
    > going naked:
    >
    > http://www.losalamos.org/lasar/lafb/cotton_kills.htm
    >
    > Jasper
     
  11. On 27 Jun 2003 13:50:21 -0700, [email protected] (Appkiller) wrote:

    >Yeah, and the whole time you are soaking wet and miserable (at least I was when I wore cotton when
    >it was hot). I know that the saying is actually referencing cold weather, but I would bet that the
    >"cooling" provided by cotton in hot weather is minimal when compared to something like, say, a
    >cool-max t-shirt that doesn't "look stupid".

    >There are many technical fabric options infinitely better (i.e. more comfortable) than cotton for
    >sweat management that are not cycling jerseys per se. If chalo wants to stew in his own sweat, that
    >is fine with me, but I prefer to stay dry.

    Anything that doesn't get wet can't provide the cooling effect that something that does get wet
    does. Unless it wicks all the transpiration to the outside, leaving none on the inside, but on said
    outside it is allowed to evaporate and the cooling effect is transferred back to inside. I don't
    know of any of those.

    Jasper
     
  12. "example.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > SO I want to buy one of those TEAM Jerseys.

    Glad to see you want to become a real cyclist!

    Wearing the proper kit separates us roadies from the herd. Check out www.probikekit.com

    Once you get it right you will realize just how lame and worthless those types are, you know the
    ones, they ride around in those cheap tee shirts that shout " look, I shop at Wal-Mart and don't
    give a damn about myself".

    Stay away from those lamers. They're just background noise, we are what's happening out on the road.

    People with low self-esteem will always try to bring us, the elite, down a peg or two.

    The attitude of a lamer freddy out on a hybrid bike wearing a stupid cotton shirt is the very same
    attitude of those creeps in Central Park who swarmed that jogger and nearly killed her, and that is
    - those cotton shirters see a top roadie like me, a guy who is at the top of his sport and it makes
    them feel inadequate, all they can do is talk trash and criticize our kit.

    We know, they really deep down wish they could look the look, and ride the ride, but for reasons of
    their own they go on living like shit.
     
  13. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > We know, they really deep down wish they could look the look, and ride the ride, but for reasons
    > of their own they go on living like sh** [my editing; this is a family ng -- TK].

    Maybe you can help me with my current "look" problem.

    When I'm cruisin' along the retail/trendy strips, I'm wont to pull-over, and walk my bike on the
    sidewalk as I peer in the shop/bistro/boutique windows to see what they've got.

    When doing so, I've got this habit of kicking the near pedal around so it goes behind my calf, so it
    doesn't whack me, and I don't step on the dangly toe strap. Trouble is, sometimes I accidentally
    kick it so hard, it /does/ whack me, right in the shin. So now I've got this ladder of scabs up my
    right shin.

    With all those wounds, I just can't shave around there. So howz 'bout if I just shave my left leg?
    Maybe a pair of Dayton Black Beauties would provide some armour against that type of injury?

    Matter of fact, I've considered talking to them about cookin' up a touring shoe -- y'know, with the
    steel shank in the sole 'n all that.

    I still like my VP pedals -- even tho' they bite, sometimes.

    cheers, & East End salutations, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  14. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 28 Jun 2003 04:59:11 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> from Shaw Residential
    Internet wrote:

    >Wearing the proper kit separates us roadies from the herd. Check out www.probikekit.com

    Normally, your advice is right on, but this time you have made a mistake. ProBikeKit doesn't have
    what he needs this time. There's only one kit to be seen in this July, and here it is:

    http://www.trekbikes.com/accessories/product_detail.jsp?product_id=2909&category_id=701

    Anything else is second tier.

    Well, wait, I'm wrong, too. There is one other jersey to be seen in: the yellow. But that's
    USPS, too. :)

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace FUN is never having to say you're SUSHI!!
    12:22:04 AM 28 June 2003
     
  15. Lenny Taylor

    Lenny Taylor Guest

    There's a shop in Sacramento that carries the larger jerseys. It's called The Rest Stop. I've
    purchased several there (56 inch chest)

    Good luck

    "example.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > SO I want to buy one of those TEAM Jerseys. It seems that XXL is equal to a size 45 (chest, or
    > maybe as big as 49"). I need a Double or Triple X American (52-56" Chest) and it'd be real nice
    if
    > it was a TALL also. Any place to buy this stuff in these sizes? or who actually MANUFACTURERS this
    > stuff so Companies (nashbar, Performance, Precaryous, etc) can put their LABEL on it??
     
  16. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > People with low self-esteem will always try to bring us, the elite, down a peg or two.

    So, who can resist an easy target?

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  17. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Anything that doesn't get wet can't provide the cooling effect that something that does get wet
    > does. Unless it wicks all the transpiration to the outside, leaving none on the inside, but on
    > said outside it is allowed to evaporate and the cooling effect is transferred back to inside. I
    > don't know of any of those.

    Actually, you've described Coolmax. Technically, it's Dacron microfiber, and the fibers are grooved
    to facilitate capillary action. Unlike cotton, or most other natural fibers, the fibers are not
    absorbent, so they don't swell with fluid and become sodden. Fabrics like this are known as
    "wicking" fabrics, they work particularly well in cycling, given the strong air flow.
     
  18. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    The proof is in the pudding (or the level of discomfort of the wearer). I am more comfortable in my
    technical fabric wear than in cotton.

    Cotton holds water rather than transporting it. Why do you think that towels are made of cotton? You
    don't see water dripping out of the other side of the towel as you dry off from your shower.
    Technical fabrics are designed to transport water, cotton happens to make fabric that feels good
    against one's skin and is highly absorbent/retentive.

    App

    Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 27 Jun 2003 13:50:21 -0700, [email protected] (Appkiller) wrote:
    >
    > >Yeah, and the whole time you are soaking wet and miserable (at least I was when I wore cotton
    > >when it was hot). I know that the saying is actually referencing cold weather, but I would bet
    > >that the "cooling" provided by cotton in hot weather is minimal when compared to something like,
    > >say, a cool-max t-shirt that doesn't "look stupid".
    >
    > >There are many technical fabric options infinitely better (i.e. more comfortable) than cotton for
    > >sweat management that are not cycling jerseys per se. If chalo wants to stew in his own sweat,
    > >that is fine with me, but I prefer to stay dry.
    >
    > Anything that doesn't get wet can't provide the cooling effect that something that does get wet
    > does. Unless it wicks all the transpiration to the outside, leaving none on the inside, but on
    > said outside it is allowed to evaporate and the cooling effect is transferred back to inside. I
    > don't know of any of those.
    >
    > Jasper
     
  19. Golightly F.

    Golightly F. Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]>
    > Wearing the proper kit separates us roadies from the herd.

    Thankfully... your kind is easy to spot.

    fwiw
     
  20. Example.Com

    Example.Com Guest

    Size on: www.probikekit.com only goes to 8 (48-50" chest), although you can search by size for 9
    (50-52"chest) - which returns no results.

    Size on: http://www.trekbikes.com/accessories/product_detail.jsp?product_id=2909&category_id=701
    only goes to XXL which is 44-46 chest

    I'd really like a 52-54" chest (6'7" - 298lbs.)

    "Kevan Smith" <kevansmi[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 28 Jun 2003 04:59:11 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
    <[email protected]>
    > from Shaw Residential Internet wrote:
    >
    > >Wearing the proper kit separates us roadies from the herd. Check out www.probikekit.com
    >
    > Normally, your advice is right on, but this time you have made a mistake. ProBikeKit doesn't have
    > what he needs this time. There's only one kit to
    be seen
    > in this July, and here it is:
    >
    >
    http://www.trekbikes.com/accessories/product_detail.jsp?product_id=2909&category_id=701
    >
    > Anything else is second tier.
    >
    > Well, wait, I'm wrong, too. There is one other jersey to be seen in: the
    yellow.
    > But that's USPS, too. :)
    >
    >
    > --
    > http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace FUN is never having to say you're SUSHI!!
    > 12:22:04 AM 28 June 2003
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...