Jerseys, shoes and other cycling bits



Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Hi /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

So I finally went to a regular cycling training session. It was great but I was left well behind, I think I might try to go to a few more sessions but I think I need some proper equipment. Which is bad because I am on a budget...

I have a road bike, fairly new, but allthough I am cycling for about 4 years now (not training rides, just cycling around basically) I have never used clipless pedals. I have also seen some horrible crashes on the tube with people not uncliping fast enough and landing on their sides.

Are there any serious clipless pedals that are also easy to unclip? Is the force that needs to be applied to clipless pedals in order to detach adjustable? I had a look at some pedals from Look which seemed pretty good and some from a Japanese company that I dont remember how its called now but that makes only pedals. Allthough the Japanese ones seemed very good in quality their design doestn look that modern, but they are made entirely of metal. The Look ones are made from plastic.

Basically whats good to look for clipless pedals? Materials? I guess that all the clipless pedals have cro-mo axles with good bearings so its probably just a matter of materials on the pedal and the clipping mechanism right?

I also need some cycling clothing. Thing is that I am bit shy cycling around with very cycling dedicated stuff so I am just gonna use those for training rides.

If I get an underlayer, does this mean that I dont need a long sleeve Jersey?

If I get some leg warmers does this mean that I dont need longer cycling pants?

What should I look for in terms of padding for the shorts? I also get very uncomfortable sometimes when I push harder. I have changed the saddle on the bike with an old saddle that I had on a previous bike that I was very used to and that helped a bit, but still. I am currently using some cycling underwear with some padding that I wear under long track pants.


Thanks /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 

mpre53

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Feb 20, 2013
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Most pedals allow you to set various release tensions for unclipping. At the lowest tension, all it takes is a quick twist of the foot to unclip.

I like Shimano SPD-SL road pedals for several reasons, among them being low maintenance, they don't jam easily if a little grit gets in them, and you can walk fairly easily (relatively speaking, that is) in the cleats. The cleats last a long time, too. Plus, every LBS has replacement cleats.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by mpre53 .

they don't jam easily if a little grit gets in them,
What do you mean jam? They jam too? Its not like they are dangerous enough in normal operation???
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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Since when are clipless pedals "dangerous enough" in normal opertion? That's a bit over the top. "They jam too?" Here's a little thought experiment: if you load enough dirt and grit into a hinged or spring based mechanism, do you think that dirt and grit can cause a jam? Uh, engineers should be nodding their heads, "yes". Now, let's unwind the panties and ask, "How often do we even hear about pedals jamming and not allowing either entry or release? Well for road pedals, not much at all. In fact it's rare to hear such things, even if a rider is using something like a Speedplay pedal which more sensitive to dirt and grit than other pedals. In cyclocross and MTB? Yeah, it's more likely to happen there, but pedals for those disciplines are designed to be used in mud and muck and too clear said mud and muck.
 

maydog

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Feb 5, 2010
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How is tipping over and landing on ones side a horrible crash? The bad ones are when you have enough momentum to send you headfirst over the handlebars. Not unclupping results in falls, not crashes.

For the record, my brother in law, my wife and I have all tipped over using clipless for the first time on the our inaugural rides. None of was hurt bad enough to end the ride. None of us have had issues since.

I have never had a pedal jam due to dirt, mud, ice or snow and I ride all winter. The only time I witnessed a mechanical prevented someone from unclipping was when a bolt fell out of a SPD cleat allowing it to rotate with the pedal. Even that did not result in a fall since he still had a free foot to put down - the chances for both feet to have an issue at the same time is remote.
 

mpre53

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Feb 20, 2013
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Originally Posted by Volnix .

What do you mean jam? They jam too? Its not like they are dangerous enough in normal operation???
Dirt and grit usually prevents you from clipping in, not clipping out. Speedplays are notorious for it.

As far as "dangerous" goes, flat platform pedals can be dangerous under certain circumstances. Wet conditions can cause your foot to slip off. So can trying to spin a decent cadence, or standing to power up a hill. Foot slippage can cause you to crash, or even open up a gash on your leg it it comes into contact with a sharp piece of a metal pedal.

The typical clipless "crash" is a 0 mph tip-over when you forget to unclip at a stop, or maybe lean too far towards your clipped in foot while waiting for a light to change, or traffic to clear. Few if any people get hurt in a 0 mph crash.

If you take a corner too fast at speed and have your rear wheel break loose on sand or wet pavement, or suffer some catastrophic frame/fork/tire failure on a fast descent, you're going down regardless of what pedals you have, and in those cases, I'd rather have my foot attached to the pedals than dangling loose. You're not going to stop a crash by dabbing a foot down, and road rash heals faster than a broken ankle.
 

CAMPYBOB

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Sep 12, 2005
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"How is tipping over and landing on ones side a horrible crash?"



Saw a rookie break his collarbone in a stop sign fall.

Funniest was watching an experienced racer get stuck in his pedals at a light and fall over. He knocked over two other guys as he fell and everyone laughed while getting untangled. No harm.

I've never fallen over, but a few years ago while lining up for a race a small stone locked up a Campy pedal so badly that I had to stop to remove the shoe from my foot and rotate the shoe inwards in order to dig the stone out.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by maydog .

The only time I witnessed a mechanical prevented someone from unclipping was when a bolt fell out of a SPD cleat allowing it to rotate with the pedal.
I'll have a look on that thanks...
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by mpre53 .


Dirt and grit usually prevents you from clipping in, not clipping out. Speedplays are notorious for it.

As far as "dangerous" goes, flat platform pedals can be dangerous under certain circumstances. Wet conditions can cause your foot to slip off. So can trying to spin a decent cadence, or standing to power up a hill. Foot slippage can cause you to crash, or even open up a gash on your leg it it comes into contact with a sharp piece of a metal pedal.

The typical clipless "crash" is a 0 mph tip-over when you forget to unclip at a stop, or maybe lean too far towards your clipped in foot while waiting for a light to change, or traffic to clear. Few if any people get hurt in a 0 mph crash.

If you take a corner too fast at speed and have your rear wheel break loose on sand or wet pavement, or suffer some catastrophic frame/fork/tire failure on a fast descent, you're going down regardless of what pedals you have, and in those cases, I'd rather have my foot attached to the pedals than dangling loose. You're not going to stop a crash by dabbing a foot down, and road rash heals faster than a broken ankle.
Thanks for the reply. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

Actually I know people who ended up in hospitals from 0km/h crashes, because they fell into something pointy and ended up with internal hemorhage.

There is also this story going round in the net about a guy who harmed his pelvis from such a fall.

Thing that I worry about is using them in traffic, wether it is bicycles or cars (even worst with cars I guess) since I make a lot of emergency stops in the city.

And the slipping off thing, that is a bit worrying too. If there is some slipping the force that caused the slip is consumed by the leg slipping of the pedal. If the leg is secured to the pedal, that slipping off force might end up causing imbalance.

Anyway I have never used them so I guess I need to give them a try first and see how it goes...
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .

"How is tipping over and landing on ones side a horrible crash?"



Saw a rookie break his collarbone in a stop sign fall.

Funniest was watching an experienced racer get stuck in his pedals at a light and fall over. He knocked over two other guys as he fell and everyone laughed while getting untangled. No harm.

I've never fallen over, but a few years ago while lining up for a race a small stone locked up a Campy pedal so badly that I had to stop to remove the shoe from my foot and rotate the shoe inwards in order to dig the stone out.
That sounds very scary...
 

CAMPYBOB

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"That sounds very scary..."

It was freaky. I was riding my way thru several packs of riders in a pre-race staging area. Picture 300-400 racers lining up by category and I'm in the middle of them suddenly unable to get the left foot out. At all. More WTF than panic. Stay calm, look ahead and try to find a route to open spaces.

There was almost zero room and lots of guys were moving alongside and in front of me. Now, I'm only rolling at .005 MPH, but it's either KEEP moving or fall over...or make a new friend and lean on him while explaining the if he moves, we're both going over!

I finally worked my way off the road and into the grass. Got my right foot out finally. Like they said above, a fall would have been something to get red-faced over more so than the risk of an injury.

Campagnolo Pro Fit pedals/cleats have done this to me about two times in the seven or eight years I've used them. The pedals have a separate release tension adjustment that I have set at about 80% of max. I can get out quite easily and never have to worry about an accidental release during sprinting, hard climbing or steering the bike with my feet in some dumb escape maneuver. It was just a small stone that looked the rear hook plate up solid with the clamp bail wire on the pedal.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by AlanKnott .

My friend recently bought some cycling jerseys and some other accessories from an online shop and was quite satisfied with it. You can also try out some online store. Do a proper research before your final buying decision.
I so will...
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .

...or make a new friend and lean on him while explaining the if he moves, we're both going over!
I think there is a law against something like that... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

I dont worry soo much about cycling events like training as everybody there is using clipless, what I worry about is dodging trucks that pop up out of nowhere when cycling alone... They tend to cause some imbalance that I am feeling that I am somehow compensating with having more freedom of move without the clipless pedals.

I think I'll get some pedals and shoes at first and maybe use them in the training rides with others...
 

FHII

New Member
May 14, 2013
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Can't help with the clipless pedals yet.... I haven't used any. I'm looking into some of the eggbeaters, but I haven't tried them yet.

Cycling clothing I can help with. My bike is the only transportation I have, so I have ridden in all kinds of weather: rain, sun, 15 degrees and 100 degrees. I have a store near by called Gabriel Brothers. It's pretty much a discount store that sells off brands and irregulars. It takes a lot of patience to shop there in that you have to dig through stuff, shop frequently and wait for what you want to come in. But in doing so, I have bought compression shorts and dry fit clothing that are comparable to Underarmour. I have also bought thermal training tights that again are comparable to UA. I also picked up a red rain resistant jacket and a few other things like sweatshirts, gloves, heveculas (a full masked hat that covers your head and face) and thermal socks. After that, for any exposed skin, get some vasaline. That list should help on cold weather rides.

At times I have to ride in the dark.... I have my lights, but reflective and bright colored clothing is a must if you ride in the dark. I am very fortunate in that a friend donated a long sleaved jersey to me that's yellow. I also had a friend who used to do landscaping and he gave me one of those reflective vests you see road construction guys wearing. I use it to drape over my backpack. Hey, I was hit by a car back in November. I was totally following all the rules and had my lights on and wore that red rain resistant jacket I was talking about.... It wasn't enough and I am a fervant believer in making yourself as visable as possible! I don't think you can overboard on that!

I'm also big on glasses for eye safety.... From performancebike.com I picked up some Scattante glasses with interchangable lenses for about $35.

I haven't ordered from this company yet, but plan to soon.... They sell jerseys, shorts and bibs pretty cheap.

http://www.ecyclingapparel.com/

I have my eye on getting some team Liquigas stuff.... Not that I am a huge fan of their team (which from what I understand is now defunct) or Cannondale bikes. But their clothing is bright colored and not too ugly! But you can pick up jerseys, shorts and bibs for under $30 and sets for under $55. I'm on a pretty tight budget too, and I need cycling clothing and will look at them first. But there are a lot of other companies out there that are pretty comparable. Do some googling and you'll find plenty of places.

Hope that helps...
 

doctorold

Member
Dec 14, 2010
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North Carolina
I have been using clipless for several years now and I have yet to fall. It requires a little practice but it's not rocket science. It simply requires remembering. I have not used them but the Speedplay pedals look extremely easy to use. Clothing? A little google searching will come up with reasonably priced stuff. I have a couple of Gore jerseys that I got for around $25 a piece on sale. If modesty is a problem with shorts, find a decent chamois and wear them under some of your exercise shorts. As far as a good chamois, you pretty much get what you pay for to an extent. There's no substitute for experience. You just gotta try something to see how you like it.
 

bartsie

New Member
Jun 20, 2011
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Originally Posted by Volnix .

Are there any serious clipless pedals that are also easy to unclip? Is the force that needs to be applied to clipless pedals in order to detach adjustable? I had a look at some pedals from Look which seemed pretty good and some from a Japanese company that I dont remember how its called now but that makes only pedals. Allthough the Japanese ones seemed very good in quality their design doestn look that modern, but they are made entirely of metal. The Look ones are made from plastic.

Basically whats good to look for clipless pedals? Materials? I guess that all the clipless pedals have cro-mo axles with good bearings so its probably just a matter of materials on the pedal and the clipping mechanism right?
I can bet all decent pedals have tension adjustment. When a person has a dreaded 'clipless moment' it's not because they physically can't twist their foot with enough force, it's because they forget and when the bike starts listing they panic. Hasn't happened to me (knock on wood) but I saw it very close once. Eugh. I read a suggestion to practice on a grassy field first, so unclipping becomes automatic.

As for what to look for, I went for convenience and chose Shimano SPD. I can walk all I want. I like it.
I have about 4,000 miles on one set and about 1,000 on the other - they still work well, without any maintenance.

I've heard the eggbeaters are nice - being able to clip in from 4 sides certainly sounds good. Mine are one-sided and it does take a few seconds to turn them the right way.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by FHII .


I have my eye on getting some team Liquigas stuff.... Not that I am a huge fan of their team (which from what I understand is now defunct) or Cannondale bikes. But their clothing is bright colored and not too ugly! But you can pick up jerseys, shorts and bibs for under $30 and sets for under $55. I'm on a pretty tight budget too, and I need cycling clothing and will look at them first. But there are a lot of other companies out there that are pretty comparable. Do some googling and you'll find plenty of places.

Hope that helps...
Yeah the liquigas stuff look nice... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
 

baker3

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Jul 13, 2009
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Speedplay pedals are ****, mine just seized up one day mid ride and almost blew my knee out.
 

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