Jet patching rod repairs

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Malk, Sep 29, 2005.

  1. Malk

    Malk Guest

    My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
    large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
    sections up to 30 metres long. The resultant surface is very uneven with
    loose gravel and is extremely uncomfortable and dangerous to ride on. If
    possible I avoid these areas to the extent of riding on the wrong side
    of the road. I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if
    any of you have experience of these road conditions.
    Malcolm Wheeler
     
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  2. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Malk
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if any of
    > you have experience of these road conditions.


    Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer for a
    coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely helpful.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton
    on the Bicycle Island
    In the Global Village
    http://www.millport.net
     
  3. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 23:22:56 +0100, Sandy Morton wrote:

    > Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer for a
    > coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely helpful.

    Yes Sandy. But you are responsible for most of the traffic on their roads!
     
  4. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Malk wrote:
    > My local authority is using "jet patching"


    Wot's that?

    <visions of 747s driving up and down it>

    R.
     
  5. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Malk wrote:

    >My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
    >large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
    >sections up to 30 metres long.


    This is how jet patching is done for those not in the know:

    http://www.jetpatcher.co.uk/Process.html

    It looks a bit rough but the repair is probably better than the
    pothole.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  6. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John Hearns
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer
    > > for a coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely
    > > helpful.

    > Yes Sandy. But you are responsible for most of the traffic on their
    > roads!


    Point taken - I hadn't thought of it like that.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton
    on the Bicycle Island
    In the Global Village
    http://www.millport.net
     
  7. Malk

    Malk Guest

    Phil Cook wrote:
    > Malk wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
    >>large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
    >>sections up to 30 metres long.

    >
    >
    > This is how jet patching is done for those not in the know:
    >
    > http://www.jetpatcher.co.uk/Process.html
    >
    > It looks a bit rough but the repair is probably better than the
    > pothole.

    This process is excellent for small potholes but it is being used to
    repair large sections of full width carriageway leaving a surface like a
    cart track and loose material which is unridable. I was interested in
    Sandy Morton's approach to the same local authority. Obviously their
    standard deteriorates the more water they have to cross. The road I
    refer to is a sustrans route and the section on the bouguillie hill(will
    mean someting to Sandy) is unrideable on a road bike. Did Sandy have to
    raise an issue ewith jet patching on Cumbrae roads, and did the pint work
     
  8. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "Malk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
    > large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
    > sections up to 30 metres long. The resultant surface is very uneven with
    > loose gravel and is extremely uncomfortable and dangerous to ride on. If
    > possible I avoid these areas to the extent of riding on the wrong side
    > of the road. I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if
    > any of you have experience of these road conditions.
    > Malcolm Wheeler


    'The nozzle delivers a jet air blast to remove unwanted debris and to clean
    the damaged area'.

    I suspect the men 'forget' to sweep up the debris.
    Once the supervising engineer is told of that fact, he will probably remind
    the contractors of the work specification.

    Paul.
     
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