Jet patching rod repairs



M

Malk

Guest
My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
sections up to 30 metres long. The resultant surface is very uneven with
loose gravel and is extremely uncomfortable and dangerous to ride on. If
possible I avoid these areas to the extent of riding on the wrong side
of the road. I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if
any of you have experience of these road conditions.
Malcolm Wheeler
 
S

Sandy Morton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Malk
<[email protected]> wrote:
> I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if any of
> you have experience of these road conditions.


Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer for a
coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely helpful.

--
A T (Sandy) Morton
on the Bicycle Island
In the Global Village
http://www.millport.net
 
J

John Hearns

Guest
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 23:22:56 +0100, Sandy Morton wrote:

> Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer for a
> coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely helpful.

Yes Sandy. But you are responsible for most of the traffic on their roads!
 
R

Richard

Guest
Malk wrote:
> My local authority is using "jet patching"


Wot's that?

<visions of 747s driving up and down it>

R.
 
P

Phil Cook

Guest
Malk wrote:

>My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
>large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
>sections up to 30 metres long.


This is how jet patching is done for those not in the know:

http://www.jetpatcher.co.uk/Process.html

It looks a bit rough but the repair is probably better than the
pothole.
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
 
S

Sandy Morton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, John Hearns
<[email protected]> wrote:
> > Don't have a confrontation - ask your area/local roads engineer
> > for a coffee/pint - and take it forward. Mine are extremely
> > helpful.

> Yes Sandy. But you are responsible for most of the traffic on their
> roads!


Point taken - I hadn't thought of it like that.

--
A T (Sandy) Morton
on the Bicycle Island
In the Global Village
http://www.millport.net
 
M

Malk

Guest
Phil Cook wrote:
> Malk wrote:
>
>
>>My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
>>large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
>>sections up to 30 metres long.

>
>
> This is how jet patching is done for those not in the know:
>
> http://www.jetpatcher.co.uk/Process.html
>
> It looks a bit rough but the repair is probably better than the
> pothole.

This process is excellent for small potholes but it is being used to
repair large sections of full width carriageway leaving a surface like a
cart track and loose material which is unridable. I was interested in
Sandy Morton's approach to the same local authority. Obviously their
standard deteriorates the more water they have to cross. The road I
refer to is a sustrans route and the section on the bouguillie hill(will
mean someting to Sandy) is unrideable on a road bike. Did Sandy have to
raise an issue ewith jet patching on Cumbrae roads, and did the pint work
 
P

Paulmouk

Guest
"Malk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My local authority is using "jet patching" to repair potholes and quite
> large sections of road involving the full width of an A class road with
> sections up to 30 metres long. The resultant surface is very uneven with
> loose gravel and is extremely uncomfortable and dangerous to ride on. If
> possible I avoid these areas to the extent of riding on the wrong side
> of the road. I intend to confront the authorities but first wonder if
> any of you have experience of these road conditions.
> Malcolm Wheeler


'The nozzle delivers a jet air blast to remove unwanted debris and to clean
the damaged area'.

I suspect the men 'forget' to sweep up the debris.
Once the supervising engineer is told of that fact, he will probably remind
the contractors of the work specification.

Paul.