John Ashcroft's Gall Bladder.

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Wb, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Wb

    Wb Guest

    Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not the
    recommended treatment ?

    The news reports that he had gall stones, and the doctors
    removed his gallbladder.

    Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?

    Just wondering,

    WB
     
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  2. Carabelli

    Carabelli Guest

    "WB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not the
    > recommended treatment ?
    >
    > The news reports that he had gall stones, and the doctors
    > removed his gallbladder.
    >
    > Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?
    >
    > Just wondering,
    >
    > WB

    Read and learn. Hulda is very specific regarding this.
    Flushes will not work on Republicans.

    carabelli
     
  3. Orac

    Orac Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    WB <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not the
    > recommended treatment ?
    >
    > The news reports that he had gall stones, and the doctors
    > removed his gallbladder.
    >
    > Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?
    >
    > Just wondering,

    Actually, John Ashcroft had a rather severe case of
    gallstone pancreatitis. He was in the intensive care unit.
    It's a very appropriate reminder of the potential REAL
    complications of untreated gallstone disease (gallstones
    treated with "liver flushes" count as "untreated," in my
    book). He could well have died. Gallstone pancreatitis has a
    very high recurrence rate (around 50% within a couple of months)--
    unless the gallbladder is removed. Consequently, the
    standard treatment is to support the patient with fluid,
    antibiotics, and intravenous nutrition until the
    pancreatitis settles down a bit (usually 4-8 days) and then
    remove the gallbladder.

    --
    Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
    |
    |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do
    |you inconvenience me with questions?"
     
  4. Wb

    Wb Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 01:29:00 GMT, Orac <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, WB
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not the
    >> recommended treatment ?
    >>
    >> The news reports that he had gall stones, and the doctors
    >> removed his gallbladder.
    >>
    >> Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?
    >>
    >> Just wondering,
    >
    >Actually, John Ashcroft had a rather severe case of
    >gallstone pancreatitis. He was in the intensive care unit.
    >It's a very appropriate reminder of the potential REAL
    >complications of untreated gallstone disease (gallstones
    >treated with "liver flushes" count as "untreated," in my
    >book). He could well have died. Gallstone pancreatitis has
    >a very high recurrence rate (around 50% within a couple of
    >months)--unless the gallbladder is removed. Consequently,
    >the standard treatment is to support the patient with
    >fluid, antibiotics, and intravenous nutrition until the
    >pancreatitis settles down a bit (usually 4-8 days) and then
    >remove the gallbladder.

    So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life threatening
    condition ?

    Duly noted that the alties are suddenly and mysteriously
    silent on this subject.

    Thanks Orac, WB
     
  5. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >From: WB [email protected]
    >Date: 3/9/2004 4:15 PM Pacific

    >Just wondering,

    Just being the usual troll
     
  6. Carabelli

    Carabelli Guest

    "Jan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >From: WB [email protected] Date: 3/9/2004 4:15 PM
    > >Pacific
    >
    > >Just wondering,
    >
    > Just being the usual troll

    Considering one of the recent threads here it seems to be
    quite on topic. If you don't want to read what WB posts -
    don't read it. Otherwise, to quote yourself, "BUTT OUT".

    What are you? - The self appointed troll police in MHA?

    carabelli
     
  7. Tsu Dho Nimh

    Tsu Dho Nimh Guest

    WB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life threatening
    >condition ?

    yes ... and it's a nasty way to die.

    Tsu Dho Nimh

    --
    When businesses invoke the "protection of consumers," it's a
    lot like politicians invoking morality and children - grab
    your wallet and/or your kid and run for your life.
     
  8. Tsu Dho Nimh

    Tsu Dho Nimh Guest

    WB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life threatening
    >condition ?

    yes ... and it's a nasty way to die.

    Tsu Dho Nimh

    --
    When businesses invoke the "protection of consumers," it's a
    lot like politicians invoking morality and children - grab
    your wallet and/or your kid and run for your life.
     
  9. Tsu Dho Nimh

    Tsu Dho Nimh Guest

    WB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life threatening
    >condition ?

    yes ... and it's a nasty way to die.

    Tsu Dho Nimh

    --
    When businesses invoke the "protection of consumers," it's a
    lot like politicians invoking morality and children - grab
    your wallet and/or your kid and run for your life.
     
  10. "Orac" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > WB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not
    > > the recommended treatment ?
    > >
    > > The news reports that he had gall stones, and the
    > > doctors removed his gallbladder.
    > >
    > > Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?
    > >
    > > Just wondering,
    >
    > Actually, John Ashcroft had a rather severe case of
    > gallstone pancreatitis. He was in the intensive care
    > unit. It's a very appropriate reminder of the potential
    > REAL complications of untreated gallstone disease
    > (gallstones treated with "liver flushes" count as
    > "untreated," in my book).

    It is a plot by the Republican branch of Evil Organized
    Medicine to make Hulda look bad!

    He could well have died. Gallstone pancreatitis has a very
    > high recurrence rate (around 50% within a couple of months)--
    > unless the gallbladder is removed. Consequently, the
    > standard treatment is to support the patient with fluid,
    > antibiotics, and intravenous nutrition until the
    > pancreatitis settles down a bit (usually 4-8 days) and
    > then remove the gallbladder.
     
  11. "carabelli" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > m01.aol.com...
    > > >From: WB [email protected] Date: 3/9/2004 4:15 PM
    > > >Pacific
    > >
    > > >Just wondering,
    > >
    > > Just being the usual troll
    >
    > Considering one of the recent threads here it seems to be
    > quite on topic. If you don't want to read what WB posts -
    > don't read it. Otherwise, to quote yourself, "BUTT OUT".
    >
    > What are you? - The self appointed troll police in MHA?

    She is being a NET NANNY and, according to the
    woman_whose_name_I_will_not_type, that is evil.
     
  12. Orac

    Orac Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    WB <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 01:29:00 GMT, Orac
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >WB <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Just wondering why a gall bladder/liver flush was not
    > >> the recommended treatment ?
    > >>
    > >> The news reports that he had gall stones, and the
    > >> doctors removed his gallbladder.
    > >>
    > >> Why choose surgery when a simple flush would do ?
    > >>
    > >> Just wondering,
    > >
    > >Actually, John Ashcroft had a rather severe case of
    > >gallstone pancreatitis. He was in the intensive care
    > >unit. It's a very appropriate reminder of the potential
    > >REAL complications of untreated gallstone disease
    > >(gallstones treated with "liver flushes" count as
    > >"untreated," in my book). He could well have died.
    > >Gallstone pancreatitis has a very high recurrence rate
    > >(around 50% within a couple of months)--unless the
    > >gallbladder is removed. Consequently, the standard
    > >treatment is to support the patient with fluid,
    > >antibiotics, and intravenous nutrition until the
    > >pancreatitis settles down a bit (usually 4-8 days) and
    > >then remove the gallbladder.
    >
    >
    > So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life
    > threatening condition ?

    Indeed. Although most cases of gallstone pancreatitis are
    mild and resolve without sequelae, 10-20% are serious, the
    overall mortality is around 4%. Mortality is markedly higher
    in those over 70, about four times higher.

    Look up Ranson's criteria on the web to see the factors that
    influence survival in acute pancreatitis. They apply to
    gallstone pancreatitis, too:

    http://www.ncemi.org/cgi-
    ncemi/edecision.pl?TheCommand=Load&NewFile=ranso
    ns_criteria_for_pancreatitis&BlankTop=1

    > Duly noted that the alties are suddenly and mysteriously
    > silent on this subject.

    Of course.

    --
    Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
    |
    |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do
    |you inconvenience me with questions?"
     
  13. Orac

    Orac Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Tsu Dho Nimh <[email protected]> wrote:

    > WB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >So gallstone induced pancreatitis can be a life
    > >threatening condition ?
    >
    > yes ... and it's a nasty way to die.

    It can be a nasty way to live, as well. Acute pancreatitis
    can sometimes lead to chronic pancreatitis, and life for
    patients with chronic pancreatitis sucks, with recurrent
    attacks of abdominal pain and inability to eat requiring
    hospital admission and sometimes necessitating intravenous
    nutrition for periods fo time, not to mention the potential
    need for surgery for complications of chronic pancreatitis,
    such as pseudocysts.

    --
    Orac |"A statement of fact cannot be insolent."
    |
    |"If you cannot listen to the answers, why do
    |you inconvenience me with questions?"
     
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