Juicer Recipes ?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mbumbotatum, May 27, 2004.

  1. Mbumbotatum

    Mbumbotatum Guest

    I was given a juicer and plan on using it mainly for health
    and not for taste.

    About all I can think to do with it is...juice carrots and
    beets and celery and drink the stuff as fast as possible, so
    as not to taste it. You can tell I'm not very creative with
    this stuff. Are there any good juiceable combinations
    (either for health or for taste) that I should be trying?
     
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  2. markd

    markd Guest

    May I suggest you give the juicer as a gift and increase
    the many health benefits of eating whole veggies and
    fruits, even avoiding the negative of concentrating sugar
    content at the expense of the many nutrients that would go
    in the garbage.

    >I was given a juicer and plan on using it mainly for health
    >and not for taste.
    >
    >About all I can think to do with it is...juice carrots and
    >beets and celery and drink the stuff as fast as possible,
    >so as not to taste it. You can tell I'm not very creative
    >with this stuff. Are there any good juiceable combinations
    >(either for health or for taste) that I should be trying?
     
  3. markd

    markd Guest

    The first seems a liquid version of "candy", the reason kids
    like fruit jucies, and the second easily solved by adding
    the material to other cooked foods, soup for example, that
    would eliminat any problems mentioned, oh yes, floss which
    you should be doing anyway. "Jucieing" is one of those fad
    kind of things that sells product on late night
    infomercials, complete without support for the health
    benefit assertions made. There are far too many goodies
    thrown away to make this but a consideration near the bottom
    of the list for purposes of nutrition.

    >You appear to have omitted mentioning some juice virtues:
    >
    >* Juice can make eating produce more pleasant - and eating
    > more fruit and vegetables has positive effects in terms
    > of displacing less desirable foods from your diet;
    >* Juicing allows access to some high-quality nutrient
    > sources which would otherwise be unavailable - such as
    > wheatgrass;
    >* Fibre in fruit can trap foods in between the teeth,
    > contributing to dental carries.
    >--
    >__________
    > |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock
    > to reply.
     
  4. markd

    markd Guest

    I understand your points, but remain unmoved by them with
    consideration of the balance of health goals and eating
    habits. Each of your points can be answered, but like the
    practice, concern for them are very far down the list of
    concerns. It smacks me too much of the fad even cult, a
    thing the area of nutrition must perhaps be at the top of
    the list for generating and fostering.

    >Maybe. But the reality is that palatability and taste *do*
    >affect people's food choices.
    >
    >If you can make people eat more beetroot and carrots by
    >pulverising them then it may be worth doing - especially if
    >the alternative is cooked and processed junk food - rather
    >than the equivalent raw produce.
    >
    >> and the second easily solved by adding the material to
    >> other cooked foods, soup for example, that would eliminat
    >> any problems mentioned [...]
    >
    >Wheatgrass soup?!?
    >
    >I think this goes against the whole idea of getting access
    >to the nutrients in *raw* foods.
    >
    >Juicing grass gives access to the nutrients *without*
    >raising them to high temperatures.
    >
    >High temperatures are known to be powerful destructive
    >forces that make all kinds of modifications to nutrients.
    >
    >Juicing avoids all that, and provides access to the
    >nutrients *without* cooking them.
    >
    >> oh yes, floss which you should be doing anyway.
    >
    >After chewing on fruit has forced sugar-coated fibres down
    >between your teeth then it is possible to remove them again
    >by laboriously cleaning between each of your teeth using
    >dental floss.
    >
    >However, this is a tedious and time-consuming process. I
    >hope you can understand why some people might regard not
    >forcing fruit fibres between your teeth in the first place
    >as a desirable option.
    >
    >> "Jucieing" is one of those fad kind of things that sells
    >> product on late night infomercials, complete without
    >> support for the health benefit assertions made. There are
    >> far too many goodies thrown away to make this but a
    >> consideration near the bottom of the list for purposes of
    >> nutrition.
    >
    >Supposed throwing away nutrients doesn't seem like that big
    >a deal to me.
    >
    >So - you throw away some fibre and a few fat-soluble
    >compounds.
    >
    >The vast majority still gets ingested. My juicer often
    >yeilds 70%-80% by weight of the original produce - and most
    >of what is discarded is plainly dominated by fibre.
    >
    >Fibre is great - but I get plenty of it from the rest
    >of my diet.
    >
    >The cases where discarded nutrients /may/ be a concern is
    >in the case of fruit skins. If your juicer discards those
    >then you might be better off eating the pulp than drinking
    >the resulting juice.
    >
    >However I'm not advocating juicing such fruit here.
    >
    >Green leafy vegetables - such as grasses - are plainly
    >among the best targets of a juicer. It is mainly access to
    >those that make juicers one of the most important bits of
    >kitchen paraphenalia.
    >--
    >__________
    > |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock
    > to reply.
     
  5. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    [email protected] wrote or quoted:

    > May I suggest you give the juicer as a gift and increase
    > the many health benefits of eating whole veggies and
    > fruits, even avoiding the negative of concentrating sugar
    > content at the expense of the many nutrients that would go
    > in the garbage.

    You appear to have omitted mentioning some juice virtues:

    * Juice can make eating produce more pleasant - and eating
    more fruit and vegetables has positive effects in terms of
    displacing less desirable foods from your diet;
    * Juicing allows access to some high-quality nutrient
    sources which would otherwise be unavailable - such as
    wheatgrass;
    * Fibre in fruit can trap foods in between the teeth,
    contributing to dental carries.
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove
    lock to reply.
     
  6. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    [email protected] wrote or quoted:

    > The first seems a liquid version of "candy", the reason
    > kids like fruit jucies [...]

    Maybe. But the reality is that palatability and taste *do*
    affect people's food choices.

    If you can make people eat more beetroot and carrots by
    pulverising them then it may be worth doing - especially if
    the alternative is cooked and processed junk food - rather
    than the equivalent raw produce.

    > and the second easily solved by adding the material to
    > other cooked foods, soup for example, that would eliminat
    > any problems mentioned [...]

    Wheatgrass soup?!?

    I think this goes against the whole idea of getting access
    to the nutrients in *raw* foods.

    Juicing grass gives access to the nutrients *without*
    raising them to high temperatures.

    High temperatures are known to be powerful destructive
    forces that make all kinds of modifications to nutrients.

    Juicing avoids all that, and provides access to the
    nutrients *without* cooking them.

    > oh yes, floss which you should be doing anyway.

    After chewing on fruit has forced sugar-coated fibres down
    between your teeth then it is possible to remove them again
    by laboriously cleaning between each of your teeth using
    dental floss.

    However, this is a tedious and time-consuming process. I
    hope you can understand why some people might regard not
    forcing fruit fibres between your teeth in the first place
    as a desirable option.

    > "Jucieing" is one of those fad kind of things that sells
    > product on late night infomercials, complete without
    > support for the health benefit assertions made. There are
    > far too many goodies thrown away to make this but a
    > consideration near the bottom of the list for purposes of
    > nutrition.

    Supposed throwing away nutrients doesn't seem like that big
    a deal to me.

    So - you throw away some fibre and a few fat-soluble
    compounds.

    The vast majority still gets ingested. My juicer often
    yeilds 70%-80% by weight of the original produce - and most
    of what is discarded is plainly dominated by fibre.

    Fibre is great - but I get plenty of it from the rest
    of my diet.

    The cases where discarded nutrients /may/ be a concern is in
    the case of fruit skins. If your juicer discards those then
    you might be better off eating the pulp than drinking the
    resulting juice.

    However I'm not advocating juicing such fruit here.

    Green leafy vegetables - such as grasses - are plainly among
    the best targets of a juicer. It is mainly access to those
    that make juicers one of the most important bits of kitchen
    paraphenalia.
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove
    lock to reply.
     
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