Junk food link to mental illness

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dan, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. Dan

    Dan Guest

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  2. TC

    TC Guest

    So there are too many carbs and not enough fats in our diets. Sounds
    like Atkins was right once again.

    TC

    Dan wrote:
    > The Mental Health Foundation said yesterday that studies had clearly
    > linked attention deficit disorder, depression, Alzheimer's disease and
    > schizophrenia to junk food and the absence of essential fats, vitamins
    > and minerals in industrialised diets.
    >
    > http://debunkbigpharma.blognation.us/blog/_archives/2006/1/16/1679036.html
     
  3. jt

    jt Guest

    On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:


    There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    junk food.

    >So there are too many carbs and not enough fats in our diets. Sounds
    >like Atkins was right once again.
    >
    >TC
    >
    >Dan wrote:
    >> The Mental Health Foundation said yesterday that studies had clearly
    >> linked attention deficit disorder, depression, Alzheimer's disease and
    >> schizophrenia to junk food and the absence of essential fats, vitamins
    >> and minerals in industrialised diets.
    >>
    >> http://debunkbigpharma.blognation.us/blog/_archives/2006/1/16/1679036.html
     
  4. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, TC wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition :

    > So there are too many carbs and not enough fats in our diets.



    Maybe, but they are not saying it.


    http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/html/content/feedingminds_exec_summary.pdf
    [...]
    Many of the studies have shown a positive association between
    saturated fat intake and the incidence of dementia, and a negative
    relationship between the incidence of dementia and intake of
    polyunsaturated fatty acid. One study looking at the total fat intake
    of eleven countries found a correlation between higher levels of fat
    consumption and higher levels of Alzheimer's disease amongst over
    65's.
    [...]
     
  5. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On 16 Jan 2006 09:23:11 -0800, Dan wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition :

    > The Mental Health Foundation said yesterday that studies had clearly
    > linked attention deficit disorder, depression, Alzheimer's disease and
    > schizophrenia to junk food and the absence of essential fats, vitamins
    > and minerals in industrialised diets.



    Here it is...

    http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/page.cfm?pagecode=PRFM

    http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/html/content/feedingminds_exec_summary.pdf
    [...]
    The role of diet in relation to specific mental health problems

    Depression

    A number of cross-country and population-based studies have linked
    the intake of certain nutrients with the reported prevalence of
    diferent types of depression. For example, correlations between low
    intakes of fish by country and high levels of depression among its
    citizens - and the reverse - have been shown for many types of
    depression.

    Complex carbohydrates as well as certain food components such as
    folic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, selenium and tryptophan are thought
    to decrease the symptoms of depression. Those with low intakes of
    folate, or folic acid, have been found to be significantly more likely
    to be diagnosed with depression than those with higher intakes.

    Similar conclusions have been drawn from studies looking at the
    association of depression with low levels of zinc and vitamins B1, B2
    and C. In other studies standard treatments have been supplemented
    with these micro-nutrients resulting in greater relief of symptoms
    in people with depression and bi-polar affective disorder, in some
    cases by as much as 50%.

    One way that vitamins and minerals may improve mental health and
    cognitive function is through their role in the brain's conversion of
    amino acids. much has been said in public fora about the importance
    of the neurotransmitter serotonin, and its presence in lower levels
    being linked to depression. Because of this, the precursor to
    serotonin - the amino acid tryptophan - has been the focus of much
    research. some studies have found that combining tryptophan with
    selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants gives
    better results than SSRIs alone. Other dietary alterations can ease
    or hinder the entry of tryptophan to the brain.


    Schizophrenia

    Studies have looked at the impact of specific nutrients on the rates
    of schizophrenia in the general population, focusing on fats and
    antioxidants. Epidemiological evidence has shown that people with
    schizophrenia have lower levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in
    their bodies than those with no experience of the illness. Other
    research has shown that antioxidant enzymes are lower in the brains
    of people with schizophrenia.

    Further work is needed in this area to identify specific mechanisms
    through which diet can work alongside other care options to alleviate
    the symptoms of schizophrenia.


    Alzheimer's Disease

    Specific connections have been found between the occurrence of
    Alzheimer's and diferent intakes of foods, including saturated fat,
    vitamins and minerals. Although there have been few controlled
    clinical trials testing the efects of nutritional treatments, most
    evidence points to the role of nutrition in the prevention of, rather
    than the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Many of the studies have
    shown a positive association between saturated fat intake and the
    incidence of dementia, and a negative relationship between the
    incidence of dementia and intake of polyunsaturated fatty acid. One
    study looking at the total fat intake of eleven countries found a
    correlation between higher levels of fat consumption and higher
    levels of Alzheimer's disease amongst over 65's.

    Other studies have explored the protection from Alzheimer's that has
    been linked with high vegetable consumption. one long term
    population-based study found that high intakes of vitamins c and e
    were linked to a lower risk of Ad, particularly among smokers, and
    this finding has been replicated in other studies.



    Attention Deicit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Many parents, teachers and others have reported great improvements
    when dietary changes are introduced to children with AdHd. Two food
    groups that have been implicated through clinical research are
    essential fatty acids (EFAs) and minerals. studies have found some
    EFAs to be signiicantly low in hyperactive children. A similar
    relationship has been found with levels of iron in children with
    symptoms of ADHD.

    [...]

    Mental health

    * Some nutrients trick the brain by triggering an over-release of
    neurotransmitters and some foods damage the brain by releasing toxins
    or oxidants that harm healthy brain cells. There are many more
    nutrients that serve the brain without deception or damage, which can
    improve mood and mental well being.

    * A balanced mood and feelings of well being can be protected by
    ensuring that our diet provides adequate amounts of complex
    carbohydrates, essential fats, amino acids, vitamins and minerals and
    water.

    * There is a plethora of anecdotal, clinical and controlled studies
    that point to the importance of diet as one part of the jigsaw in the
    prevention of poor mental health and the promotion of good mental
    health.

    * Research indicates that good nutritional intake may be linked to
    academic success. A number of studies report that providing children
    with breakfast improves their daily and long-term academic
    performance.

    * Among some young ofenders, diets supplemented with vitamins,
    minerals and essential fatty acids have resulted in significant and
    remarkable reductions in anti-social behaviour.



    Mental health problems

    * There is growing evidence that diet plays an important contributory
    role in specific mental health problems including Attention deficit
    Hyperactivity disorder (AdHd), depression, schizophrenia and
    Alzheimer's disease.

    * The presentation of depression in the UK population has increased
    dramatically over recent decades and this has been accompanied by a
    decrease in the age of onset, with more cases being reported in
    children, adolescents and young adults.

    * A correlation between low intakes of fish by a country and high
    levels of depression amongst its citizens, as well as the reverse,
    has been shown for major depression, post-natal depression, seasonal
    affective disorder and bipolar affective disorder.

    * The incidence of schizophrenia is similar across the globe,
    although there are differences in outcomes between countries. This
    implies that environmental factors have some role in determining the
    duration and severity of symptoms, and the role that diet has to play
    is attracting increasing scientific interest.

    * Alzheimer's disease has become more common in the past fifty years
    and is believed to be the result of a combination of factors,
    including the aging population, genetics and environmental factors.

    * growing epidemiological evidence suggests that diet may be one of
    those environmental factors with associations being reported between
    the occurrence of Alzheimer's and the amount of saturated fats,
    vitamins and minerals consumed.

    * complementary mental health care services that focus on diet and
    nutrition report promising results, particularly among those who
    experience ADHD and depression. On the whole however, they are poorly
    resourced and have received insufficient research attention to draw
    firm conclusions.
     
  6. TC

    TC Guest

    jt wrote:
    > On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    > is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    > junk food.


    And not enough healthy animal fats from healthy animals.

    The problem fats are the newer manufactured and processed fats like
    margarine, shortening, canola, oils etc.

    There is nothing wrong with tallow from healthy cattle, or lard from
    healthy pigs, or goose fat, or chicken fat, or olive oil (extra virgin
    of course), or butter from healthy cows.

    TC

    >
    > >So there are too many carbs and not enough fats in our diets. Sounds
    > >like Atkins was right once again.
    > >
    > >TC
    > >
    > >Dan wrote:
    > >> The Mental Health Foundation said yesterday that studies had clearly
    > >> linked attention deficit disorder, depression, Alzheimer's disease and
    > >> schizophrenia to junk food and the absence of essential fats, vitamins
    > >> and minerals in industrialised diets.
    > >>
    > >> http://debunkbigpharma.blognation.us/blog/_archives/2006/1/16/1679036.html
     
  7. jt

    jt Guest

    On 16 Jan 2006 10:51:10 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >jt wrote:
    >> On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    >> is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    >> junk food.

    >
    >And not enough healthy animal fats from healthy animals.
    >
    >The problem fats are the newer manufactured and processed fats like
    >margarine, shortening, canola, oils etc.
    >

    The problem carbs are newer manufactured and processed carbs like high
    fructose corn syrup, enriched white flour, etc

    >There is nothing wrong with tallow from healthy cattle, or lard from
    >healthy pigs, or goose fat, or chicken fat, or olive oil (extra virgin
    >of course), or butter from healthy cows.
    >

    There is nothing wrong with whole grains either something that Atkins
    simplistic macro nutrient approach fails to address.
     
  8. TC

    TC Guest

    jt wrote:
    > On 16 Jan 2006 10:51:10 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >jt wrote:
    > >> On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    > >> is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    > >> junk food.

    > >
    > >And not enough healthy animal fats from healthy animals.
    > >
    > >The problem fats are the newer manufactured and processed fats like
    > >margarine, shortening, canola, oils etc.
    > >

    > The problem carbs are newer manufactured and processed carbs like high
    > fructose corn syrup, enriched white flour, etc
    >
    > >There is nothing wrong with tallow from healthy cattle, or lard from
    > >healthy pigs, or goose fat, or chicken fat, or olive oil (extra virgin
    > >of course), or butter from healthy cows.
    > >

    > There is nothing wrong with whole grains either something that Atkins
    > simplistic macro nutrient approach fails to address.


    Grains are good for animals with four stomachs or a gizzard. They are
    an inferior food for humans. Their fibre is too abrasive, they lack
    many nutrients we need, and they cause all kinds of problems thru
    allergies and other negative reactions. Even when whole, grains are
    poor food for humans.

    TC
     
  9. jt

    jt Guest

    On 16 Jan 2006 12:07:50 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >jt wrote:
    >> On 16 Jan 2006 10:51:10 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >jt wrote:
    >> >> On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    >> >> is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    >> >> junk food.
    >> >
    >> >And not enough healthy animal fats from healthy animals.
    >> >
    >> >The problem fats are the newer manufactured and processed fats like
    >> >margarine, shortening, canola, oils etc.
    >> >

    >> The problem carbs are newer manufactured and processed carbs like high
    >> fructose corn syrup, enriched white flour, etc
    >>
    >> >There is nothing wrong with tallow from healthy cattle, or lard from
    >> >healthy pigs, or goose fat, or chicken fat, or olive oil (extra virgin
    >> >of course), or butter from healthy cows.
    >> >

    >> There is nothing wrong with whole grains either something that Atkins
    >> simplistic macro nutrient approach fails to address.

    >
    >Grains are good for animals with four stomachs or a gizzard. They are
    >an inferior food for humans.


    Here we go again

    >Their fibre is too abrasive, they lack
    >many nutrients we need,


    Its called eating a well balanced diet. Beef and milk also lack
    nutrients found elsewhere

    > and they cause all kinds of problems thru allergies and other negative reactions.


    Obviously if you are born with some sort of intolerance or allergy to
    something then you should avoid it. Are you saying we should all stop
    eating dairy because a segment of the population is either allergic or
    intolerant to it? I didn't think so.
     
  10. TC

    TC Guest

    jt wrote:
    > On 16 Jan 2006 12:07:50 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >jt wrote:
    > >> On 16 Jan 2006 10:51:10 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> >jt wrote:
    > >> >> On 16 Jan 2006 09:41:28 -0800, "TC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >> There is plenty of fat already in peoples diets. However most of it
    > >> >> is from McDonalds etc which I would not classify as essential fats but
    > >> >> junk food.
    > >> >
    > >> >And not enough healthy animal fats from healthy animals.
    > >> >
    > >> >The problem fats are the newer manufactured and processed fats like
    > >> >margarine, shortening, canola, oils etc.
    > >> >
    > >> The problem carbs are newer manufactured and processed carbs like high
    > >> fructose corn syrup, enriched white flour, etc
    > >>
    > >> >There is nothing wrong with tallow from healthy cattle, or lard from
    > >> >healthy pigs, or goose fat, or chicken fat, or olive oil (extra virgin
    > >> >of course), or butter from healthy cows.
    > >> >
    > >> There is nothing wrong with whole grains either something that Atkins
    > >> simplistic macro nutrient approach fails to address.

    > >
    > >Grains are good for animals with four stomachs or a gizzard. They are
    > >an inferior food for humans.

    >
    > Here we go again
    >
    > >Their fibre is too abrasive, they lack
    > >many nutrients we need,

    >
    > Its called eating a well balanced diet. Beef and milk also lack
    > nutrients found elsewhere
    >
    > > and they cause all kinds of problems thru allergies and other negative reactions.

    >
    > Obviously if you are born with some sort of intolerance or allergy to
    > something then you should avoid it. Are you saying we should all stop
    > eating dairy because a segment of the population is either allergic or
    > intolerant to it? I didn't think so.


    Grains cause allergies. Grains cause Crohn's Disease and other GI
    ailments. Grains have absolutely no essential nutrients whatsoever.
    Grains are completely superflous to good health and good diet. If we
    ate no grains we would not suffer any nutritional deficiencies and we
    would, in fact, be healthier.

    There is no need for any grains in any quantity in the human diet. It
    is nothing more than filler and serves no useful purpose except to make
    money for the grain companies and the grain food manufacturers and
    processors.

    TC
     
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