Just an FYI - Sigma bike computers are fragile.



MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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Which is why the LBS owner is pushing me that way. If I were 19, seriously fast, and had real potential, I could see something more sport-specific. Considering that I will probably spend 99% of the time on this bike training or just riding for general fitness and recreation, I am inclined to believe I just need a good general purpose road bike.
 

MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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Ok, gonna jump ahead here. Tell me about outfitting a road bike, what gear will I need? Because the way I have approached this with my other bikes won't work - I have pretty much every gadget out there on these bikes, I have a rack with case full of you name it, tools, extra battery pack to charge iPhone/iPad, spare inner tube, CO2 cylinders, critical or useful meds and first aid supplies -well, you get the picture. Probably adds a good 10-12 lbs of weight in total to the bike. To top it all off, I usually ride with a pack and carry my iPad, some extra food and water, often an extra jersey or hoodie depending on the weather, extra pair of gloves in case the ones I am wearing get wet, various **** - my pack is often a good 10-12 lbs too. Clearly not going to cut it on a road bike. I know I will need to lighten the load considerably. But, I do believe I will need the following accessories/equipment: Lights - because I do more riding in the dark than in daylight. Gonna use my Phillips. Also a rear red light. Cage and water bottle. Bike computer of some type. I use MMRide, but I like having an onboard backup. Some kind of emergency tool kit with a couple of absolute necessities, such as a tire tool. What else?
 

MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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Pedals, shoes. Never was capable of using a clip system, too uncoordinated. Just say screw it and ride in my regular footwear? Or try to adapt to an appropriate system?
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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MotownBikeBoy said:
Which is why the LBS owner is pushing me that way. If I were 19, seriously fast, and had real potential, I could see something more sport-specific. Considering that I will probably spend 99% of the time on this bike training or just riding for general fitness and recreation, I am inclined to believe I just need a good general purpose road bike.
Frankly, being comfortable is big part of getting the best performance out of yourself .
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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MotownBikeBoy said:
Ok, gonna jump ahead here. Tell me about outfitting a road bike, what gear will I need? Because the way I have approached this with my other bikes won't work - I have pretty much every gadget out there on these bikes, I have a rack with case full of you name it, tools, extra battery pack to charge iPhone/iPad, spare inner tube, CO2 cylinders, critical or useful meds and first aid supplies -well, you get the picture. Probably adds a good 10-12 lbs of weight in total to the bike. To top it all off, I usually ride with a pack and carry my iPad, some extra food and water, often an extra jersey or hoodie depending on the weather, extra pair of gloves in case the ones I am wearing get wet, various **** - my pack is often a good 10-12 lbs too. Clearly not going to cut it on a road bike. I know I will need to lighten the load considerably. But, I do believe I will need the following accessories/equipment: Lights - because I do more riding in the dark than in daylight. Gonna use my Phillips. Also a rear red light. Cage and water bottle. Bike computer of some type. I use MMRide, but I like having an onboard backup. Some kind of emergency tool kit with a couple of absolute necessities, such as a tire tool. What else?
Well, aside from all the components on the bike, you've pretty much got it covered. As part of the emergency kit I'd consider at least one inner tube (some folks carry two), a patch kit, an inflation method (some folks carry a mini-pump while others--like me--carry a CO2 inflator. If you go with the latter, you'll want to carry 2-3 canisters of CO2 and the inflator), a tire boot (used to cover a gash in a tire to keep the inner tube from poking through), a tire lever or two, and some sort of mini-tool. There's no big penalty for having a second water bottle cage. Certainly having a second water bottle can mean having to stop less, and it's also a wise addition in the warm/hot months. A medium sized saddle bag can hold the emergency kit stuff and possibly keys, cash, credit card). I imagine you already carry something similar, but if you don't I'd recommend getting a Road ID bracelet so that EMS and the ER can have phone and computer access to any critical medical info of yours.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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MotownBikeBoy said:
Pedals, shoes. Never was capable of using a clip system, too uncoordinated. Just say screw it and ride in my regular footwear? Or try to adapt to an appropriate system?
What clipless pedals have you tried? There are some dead simple system out there that take very little coordination at all, and by very little I mean a vanishingly small amount. If I were I would see if there's an LBS that would let you try a few different option out on an indoor trainer in the store. Shimano, Look, and Speedplay all make great pedals as well as a variety of pedal types.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by MotownBikeBoy

Pedals, shoes. Never was capable of using a clip system, too uncoordinated. Just say screw it and ride in my regular footwear? Or try to adapt to an appropriate system?
I was totally frightened of clipless pedals... When I flipped my commuter in a gear deal on a shop I got a pair of Shimano 105's and some Shimano shoes. I wanted to get a pair of Look ones but the shop didnt have Look.

I have about 600km on them and I didnt fall once so far... Only in the second ride or so I stopped to check for direction at some point and I forgot to unclip them, but even then when I tried to balance the pedals got detached and I didnt fall.

I am wondering how I was not using them now... They make a big difference and by using the full circle of the crank motion you do get less tired... When I am using the bike without being clipped in I even feel uncomfortable.

It was only the last time that I slipped that the bike was "pulling" me whilst sliding but I unclipped the pedals and me and the bike slipped on different directions...
big-smile.png


Plus if this a UCI sanctioned event you are planning on taking part I think that -you need- to have a clipless system...
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by MotownBikeBoy

Which is why the LBS owner is pushing me that way. If I were 19, seriously fast, and had real potential, I could see something more sport-specific. Considering that I will probably spend 99% of the time on this bike training or just riding for general fitness and recreation, I am inclined to believe I just need a good general purpose road bike.
Actually you can get a bit of extra handlebar height on the Tarmac, similar to the Roubaix, if you use all the spacers under the stem and maybe if you change the stem to something with a bigger angle.

As far as the whole "Zertz" inserts comfort thing maybe it does make a difference when using the bike on cobblestone roads but...

Apparently the Allez that I am using has the same geometry as the Tarmac. Its really comfortable and predictable actually, the commuter was kinda "hiding" the road vibrations but it felt more random...

The Roubaix is not exactly an all around... Its a Roubaix race specific bike which is designed to be raced in bad surfaces. Not as bad as cyclocross but in bad surfaces like cobblestone roads etc...

Both are great but I would definately vote for the Tarmac...
big-smile.png
Unless you are gonna be riding alot on bad roads... Or bad weather as the Roubaix also has a disk brake model.

Cannondale's Caad8 is kinda in the same philosophy as the Roubaix but without Zertz. More comfy then the Caad10 apparently due to a different bit more relaxed geometry... I dont know which the carbon model geometry equivalent is...
 

MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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Thanks, guys. This is great. Never tried a clipless system. My experience with clips was 20 years ago on my Cannondale, I hated those. But I definitely need to walk the walk, so to speak. LBS will definitely help me out, they are very full service. I'm not stuck on the Roubaix by any means, I haven't commited to anything yet.
 

Volnix

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Feb 19, 2011
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Originally Posted by MotownBikeBoy

Thanks, guys. This is great.

Never tried a clipless system. My experience with clips was 20 years ago on my Cannondale, I hated those. But I definitely need to walk the walk, so to speak. LBS will definitely help me out, they are very full service.

I'm not stuck on the Roubaix by any means, I haven't commited to anything yet.
Alienator is trying to make you buy the Roubaix so he can be faster then you in his Look Super Rigid anyway...
big-smile.png
(Which is another great bike btw).

Hmmm now that I think of it... Look makes a "slightly" aero bike:

Look 695:



Its kinda in the same philosophy as the Venge...
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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MotownBikeBoy said:
Thanks, guys. This is great. Never tried a clipless system. My experience with clips was 20 years ago on my Cannondale, I hated those. But I definitely need to walk the walk, so to speak. LBS will definitely help me out, they are very full service. I'm not stuck on the Roubaix by any means, I haven't commited to anything yet.
FYI, Shimano 105 pedals are about the best bang for the buck going. They be had for $70-80 online. Note that sharing the same geometry does not mean the ride is the same, especially when you're talking about the differences between a CF frame and a metal frame. The tube sizes are different, and how the CF frame behaves is largely dependent on how the CF is laid up. The Roubaix certainly is not meant just for racing on cobbles. It's marketed to regular folks as an all-day ride worthy bike, a sportif bike, and a bike that handles well. Look for reviews online.
 

MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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alienator said:
FYI, Shimano 105 pedals are about the best bang for the buck going. They be had for $70-80 online. Note that sharing the same geometry does not mean the ride is the same, especially when you're talking about the differences between a CF frame and a metal frame. The tube sizes are different, and how the CF frame behaves is largely dependent on how the CF is laid up. The Roubaix certainly is not meant just for racing on cobbles. It's marketed to regular folks as an all-day ride worthy bike, a sportif bike, and a bike that handles well. Look for reviews online.
One of my themes in life now is trying new things. So, checking into all of this is an educational experience that definitely broadens my horizons.
 

ambal

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Oct 15, 2010
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Originally Posted by MotownBikeBoy


One of my themes in life now is trying new things. So, checking into all of this is an educational experience that definitely broadens my horizons.
Thats a great moto, so many people are stuck in their comfort zones and forget to actually live their freakin life.
 

MotownBikeBoy

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Nov 24, 2012
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Ok, that was also weird! LOL. So, I did not make it back to the bike shop yesterday. I was running late all day and trying to get a lot of things done. When I get there, they are going to do an analysis on a trainer so I end up with the right fit/geometry.