Just giving stuff away, innit...?!

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Nick Pedley, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. Nick Pedley

    Nick Pedley Guest

    Reading about how AndyP gave away a Wainwright book by leaving it in the
    toilets in Ambleside reminded of the time I gave away a tent in America.

    I'd just finished walking a stretch of the Appalachian Trail and before I
    took the bus to Niagara Falls I stayed in a motel. I was wondering what to
    do with the Walmart cheap and cheerful 2-man ridge tent when I met the motel
    owner and asked she had any ideas for it, she took it off me and said her
    son could use it. Been wondering ever since how much use it got....

    So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?

    Nick
     
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  2. ?

    ? Guest

    > So, what's the best thing you've given away

    My virginity



    >and what happened?


    Gonorrhea
     
  3. ? wrote:
    >>So, what's the best thing you've given away

    >
    >
    > My virginity
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>and what happened?

    >
    >
    > Gonorrhea


    Organization line :)


    --
    Dave McLaughlin

    Homo Sapiens Non Urinat In Ventum
     
  4. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 13:32:13 -0000, Nick Pedley wrote:

    >Reading about how AndyP gave away a Wainwright book by leaving it in the
    >toilets in Ambleside reminded of the time I gave away a tent in America.
    >
    >So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?
    >

    A copy of Touching The Void left in the bothy at A' Chuil. It probably
    got used for firelighting. But I recently got a replacement as a
    present from Mum and Dad after badgering them to go and watch the
    film.

    Also several print-outs of maps in various places.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  5. Nick Pedley wrote:

    > So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?


    Walked away from a cashpoint without taking the money. Realised
    my mistake within 10 seconds and turned back but the person behind
    me in the queue had nabbed it and legged it.

    Chris
     
  6. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On 16 Dec 2004 07:20:53 -0800, "Chris Gilbert" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Nick Pedley wrote:
    >
    >> So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?

    >
    >Walked away from a cashpoint without taking the money. Realised
    >my mistake within 10 seconds and turned back but the person behind
    >me in the queue had nabbed it and legged it.


    Nice area you frequent ;-)

    I have given most of my money away, regularly, to what I am told is my
    "family". They are profoundly ungrateful for this act of charity.

    Other than that, probably pints and pints of blood over the years. It's
    quite a nice feeling to think that someone is probably alive as a result.
    Sorry it's not very original.

    --
    I would if I could but I can't so I won't.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  7. John Laird wrote:
    > On 16 Dec 2004 07:20:53 -0800, "Chris Gilbert" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nick Pedley wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?

    >>
    >>Walked away from a cashpoint without taking the money. Realised
    >>my mistake within 10 seconds and turned back but the person behind
    >>me in the queue had nabbed it and legged it.

    >
    >
    > Nice area you frequent ;-)
    >
    > I have given most of my money away, regularly, to what I am told is my
    > "family". They are profoundly ungrateful for this act of charity.
    >
    > Other than that, probably pints and pints of blood over the years. It's
    > quite a nice feeling to think that someone is probably alive as a result.
    > Sorry it's not very original.
    >

    As a recipient of the odd gallon or two of blood following a bone marrow
    problem - **Many Thanks**

    --
    Dave McLaughlin

    Homo Sapiens Non Urinat In Ventum
     
  8. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 16:26:18 GMT, Dave Mclaughlin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Laird wrote:
    >>
    >> Other than that, probably pints and pints of blood over the years. It's
    >> quite a nice feeling to think that someone is probably alive as a result.
    >> Sorry it's not very original.
    >>

    >As a recipient of the odd gallon or two of blood following a bone marrow
    >problem - **Many Thanks**


    <sniff>

    No problem at all. No, really. I think I'm currently helping folks
    suffering from thalassemia and/or other forms of anemia. (I just donate
    red cells.)

    --
    How do they get teflon to stick to the pans?

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  9. Woollyzone

    Woollyzone Guest

    "Dave Mclaughlin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > John Laird wrote:
    >> On 16 Dec 2004 07:20:53 -0800, "Chris Gilbert"
    >> <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>


    >>
    >> Other than that, probably pints and pints of blood over the years. It's
    >> quite a nice feeling to think that someone is probably alive as a result.
    >> Sorry it's not very original.
    >>

    > As a recipient of the odd gallon or two of blood following a bone marrow
    > problem - **Many Thanks**
    >


    Just want to add a little bit to that on the subject of blood transfusions -
    one of my footy team's players (Norwich) - named Gary Holt, recently had to
    have 3 pints of blood removed from a build up in his chest following an
    injury, and, naturally enough, had to have it replaced. However, Gary, proud
    Scot that he is, is mortified that half his blood is now English ;-)
     
  10. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Nick Pedley" <[email protected]> wrote

    > So, what's the best thing you've given away and what happened?


    I left my old bike in the street with a sign on it saying "Free bike, please
    take". It was gone in less than 20 minutes.
     
  11. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 18:52:29 +0000, Chris Street
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 17:40:13 +0000, John Laird wrote:
    >
    >> I think I'm currently helping folks
    >> suffering from thalassemia and/or other forms of anemia. (I just donate
    >> red cells.)

    >
    >I'm the other way round. They leave my red cells in and suck the plasma
    >out. I think it's for burns or summat.


    That's unusual. Most of the folks in the clinic I attend are donating
    platelets (the sticky bits) - most recipients are having cancer treatment.
    Platelet loss is made up very quickly and some donors go along every 3-4
    weeks. Red cells on the other hand take about 4-5 days just to grow, so
    it's that long before any extra even start to arrive. I know this as I went
    walking 3 days after my first apheresis donation and thought I was going to
    die on the way up ! (Oxygen capacity down about 20-25%. No doubt someone
    can work out what effective altitude this corresponds to.)

    --
    I don't have a solution but I admire the problem.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  12. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 18:52:29 +0000, Chris Street
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >They leave my red cells in and suck the plasma
    >out. I think it's for burns or summat.


    Of course, I meant to add: they actually suck it all out and give you back
    the bits they don't want ! You get to watch it all happening - unlike
    normal donor sessions where you're positively discouraged from peeking at
    anything...

    Things have changed a lot from the wham-bam style of the early 80s. I used
    to be in and out in about 5 minutes, and you could have a can of Guinness
    instead of a cuppa :)

    --
    Just an amoeba in the Petri dish of life...

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  13. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:47:41 +0000, Chris Street
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:00:05 +0000, John Laird wrote:
    >>
    >> That's unusual. Most of the folks in the clinic I attend are donating
    >> platelets (the sticky bits) - most recipients are having cancer treatment.

    >
    >That's the one - plasma and platelets. Huge machine that chugs along for a
    >few hours


    Like something out of a Hammer horror movie. You do get to watch telly,
    read a magazine, and have someone bring tea and coffee while you're gently
    emptied, however ;-) You can try your own quips about being on the rinse or
    spin cycle, but the nurses do seem to have heard them all before.

    >> Platelet loss is made up very quickly and some donors go along every 3-4
    >> weeks. Red cells on the other hand take about 4-5 days just to grow, so
    >> it's that long before any extra even start to arrive. I know this as I went
    >> walking 3 days after my first apheresis donation and thought I was going to
    >> die on the way up ! (Oxygen capacity down about 20-25%. No doubt someone
    >> can work out what effective altitude this corresponds to.)

    >
    >About 2800m


    Ta. Never been that high, but useful to have had some idea of what it might
    feel like. Being an ignorant and stubborn type, I didn't put 2 and 2
    together, but soldiered on at my usual pace for a fair while. The sweat
    running down my face may have alarmed everyone I encountered !

    --
    We have standards and expect you not to exceed them.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  14. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:00:05 +0000, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]
    > (Oxygen capacity down about 20-25%. No doubt someone
    >can work out what effective altitude this corresponds to.)


    Far too high....

    I hope you feel much stronger now! :)


    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ Email: pee AT [what's missing?] STOP co STOP uk
     
  15. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 18:28:50 +0000, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:00:05 +0000, John Laird
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >[...]
    >> (Oxygen capacity down about 20-25%. No doubt someone
    >>can work out what effective altitude this corresponds to.)

    >
    >Far too high....
    >
    >I hope you feel much stronger now! :)


    At the moment, I feel like a Friday night :-(

    --
    Fer sell cheep: IBM spel chekker. Wurks grate.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
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