just saw an accident.



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Dene Wilby

Guest
Hi,

can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just pulling
away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw a body
fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up the bus
driver was already off the bus and making a call on his phone and about 10 people were crowding
around. I know no first aid watsoever so just got back on my bike and started cycling. Trouble is,
the young lad who looked in his late teens was lying lifeless on his back with lots of blood on the
road from the back of his head. I don't think the bus was going at a great speed and it hadn't
actually run over the lad, he was lying directly in front of the bus.

I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could mean
there would be large amounts of blood.

I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic it
made me quite scared to be out there

I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.

Dene
 
T

Tony Hogarty

Guest
Dene Wilby wrote:

> Hi,
>
> can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just
> pulling away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw
> a body fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up
> the bus driver was already off the bus and making a call on his phone and about 10 people were
> crowding around. I know no first aid watsoever so just got back on my bike and started cycling.
> Trouble is, the young lad who looked in his late teens was lying lifeless on his back with lots of
> blood on the road from the back of his head. I don't think the bus was going at a great speed and
> it hadn't actually run over the lad, he was lying directly in front of the bus.
>
> I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
> necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could
> mean there would be large amounts of blood.
>
> I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic
> it made me quite scared to be out there
>
> I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
> into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.
>
> Dene

Head wounds always bleed a lot so it may not be as bad as it looks at first sight.
--
Take out the garbage to reply

Regards Tony Hogarty
 
M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just
> pulling away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw
> a body fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up
> the bus driver was already off the bus and making a call on his phone and about 10 people were
> crowding around. I know no first aid watsoever so just got back on my bike and started cycling.
> Trouble is, the young lad who looked in his late teens was lying lifeless on his back with lots of
> blood on the road from the back of his head. I don't think the bus was going at a great speed and
> it hadn't actually run over the lad, he was lying directly in front of the bus.
>
> I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
> necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could
> mean there would be large amounts of blood.
>
> I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic
> it made me quite scared to be out there
>
> I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
> into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.

Head injuries cause loads of blood - lots and lots and lots. Almost ridiculous amounts. Bleeding is
no problem - he'd be in hospital ages and ages before it would become a problem, and even then
they'd just pour a load more back in. You did the right thing carrying on - if there's bugger all
you can doo there's no point getting in peoples way. Good one starting to phone the ambulance tho -
it's you'd be amazed at the amount of people that just stand and stare.

Perhaps this is the time to go for a bit of first aid training. An evening is all it takes and a
basic course will probably be free - ask St. Johns ambulance/Red Cross - if they do charge the
money'll go to a good cause anyway!

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M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> Head injuries cause loads of blood - lots and lots and lots. Almost
ridiculous
> amounts. Bleeding is no problem - he'd be in hospital ages and ages before it would become a
> problem, and even then they'd just pour a load more back in.
You
> did the right thing carrying on - if there's bugger all you can doo there's no point getting in
> peoples way. Good one starting to phone the ambulance tho - it's you'd be amazed at the amount of
> people that just stand and stare.

It's a sad indictment of my reading skills that I'd proof read that lot before I posted it.

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L

-Lsqnot Respond

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:21:46 +0000 (UTC), Dene Wilby
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Hi,
>
>can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just pulling
>away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw a body
>fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up the bus
>driver was already off the bus and making a call on his phone and about 10 people were crowding
>around. I know no first aid watsoever so just got back on my bike and started cycling. Trouble is,
>the young lad who looked in his late teens was lying lifeless on his back with lots of blood on the
>road from the back of his head. I don't think the bus was going at a great speed and it hadn't
>actually run over the lad, he was lying directly in front of the bus.
>
>I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
>necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could
>mean there would be large amounts of blood.
>
>I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic it
>made me quite scared to be out there
>
>I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
>into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.
>
>Dene

As other posters have said, blood in its own right is nothing to get overly worried about. I'm not
sure the same reassurances can really be offered regarding what the effects might be of getting
hit by a bus.

If you are feeling civically virtuous you ought to contact the police and let them know you
witnessed it.

As someone else has pointed out, might be worth getting first aid trained. Having someone on the
scene when things like this happen can make a real difference. In most cases the difference is
likely to be someone purely having the confidence to 'manage' the incident and *not* do certain
things while ensuring the pros are summoned and directed pdq.
 
E

Elyob

Guest
"Dene Wilby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hi,
>
> can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just
> pulling away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw
> a body fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up
> the bus driver was already off the bus and making a call on his phone and about 10 people were
> crowding around. I know no first aid watsoever so just got back on my bike and started cycling.
> Trouble is, the young lad who looked in his late teens was lying lifeless on his back with lots of
> blood on the road from the back of his head. I don't think the bus was going at a great speed and
> it hadn't actually run over the lad, he was lying directly in front of the bus.
>
> I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
> necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could
> mean there would be large amounts of blood.
>
> I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic
> it made me quite scared to be out there
>
> I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
> into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.
>
> Dene

If you can give any witness accounts to the police, then do so too. Otherwise, as already mentioned,
you did the right thing. Reminds me to do a first aid course too.
 
M

Mseries

Guest
Dene Wilby wrote:
> Hi,
>
> can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up.

It doesn't half shake one up doesn't it. I arrived at the scene of RTA in Bradford a few weeks ago,
a young cyclist had been hit by a car, he was sitting up with a blanket around his legs with several
other motorists in attendence.

Regarding the blood, one of my earliest memories of my childhood was being hit by a car, a Morris
Traveller actually, green & wood, I was OK, got a scare still, 35 years later but you should have
seen the blood !
 
D

Dene Wilby

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> Dene Wilby wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up.

Thanks guys for putting my mind at rest somewhat. Just checked the local teletext news and
nothing so hopefully he's OK. Terrible sound though of the brakes and thud noise, would hate to
see that again.

As for witnessing, I was cycling behind the bus and didn't really see that much, there are a lot of
people around there who must have seen the impact (it was 5:30pm). Thing is, I left work, shut the
door and locked up and realised i'd left my trip computer inside, so went back inside. would have
missed the whole thing if I hadn't :-(

On a lighter note, these dry days we are having have enabled me to get the road bike out for the
first time since October and it feels great. 4 months of rain and the mountain bike will soon be a
distant memory as we head for a fabulous spring/summer (hopefully)

OK, thanks again,

Dene
 
J

Johnb

Guest
Dene Wilby wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up. I was just
> pulling away from work on my bike and saw the bus in front of me brake and there was a thud, I saw
> a body fall to the ground. I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile.
>
> I cannot even remember my 10 mile ride home, it was a blur and I was so conscious of the traffic
> it made me quite scared to be out there
>
> I'm sorry if this is not the correct place to post this but I know many of you have done research
> into head injuries by all the helmet threads that go on.

Nothing to do with helmets. So long as you phoned 999 your conscience will be clear. You did,
didn't you.

John B
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
Dene Wilby <[email protected]> writes:

> I have never seen anything like that and I just wanted someone to assure me that that doesn't
> necessarily mean it was a fatal accident and that if you cut your head open in such a way could
> mean there would be large amounts of blood.

Scalp wounds, even small ones, bleed copiously. There are a lot of blood vessels just under your
scalp - that's why you lose so much heat through your head in cold weather.

Of course, this doesn't mean it was a trivial injury. But lots of blood does not necessarily mean a
fatal one, either.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:51:45 -0000 someone who may be "Tony Raven"
<[email protected]> wrote this:-

>I can tell you a little blood goes an unbelievably long way.

Yes. What looks like an axe murder can turn out to be fairly minor. A few thimbles worth of blood
spread out in an amazing fashion and can often look far worse than they are. Human bodies are
remarkably tough in many ways, though obviously I have no idea about this incident.

--
David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
 
J

James Hodson

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:28:07 +0000, Tony Hogarty
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Head wounds always bleed a lot so it may not be as bad as it looks at first sight.

Too right, Tony

Many years I was lifted my bonnet (Missus!) with the intention of checking my lubricants (also
Missus). I hit my forehead on the clip that held the hood in place. The result was blood, blood and
more blood all over the place.

Fortunately, no serious damage was done; but there was one helluva mess.

James
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:51:45 -0000, "Tony Raven"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I can't reassure you on how bad it might actually be but I can tell you a little blood goes an
>unbelievably long way.

Get a pint of milk. Drop it on the kitchen floor. That's a big mess, right? You can lose that amount
of blood no problem - how else would blood donating work?

> A period of unconciousness would not be unusual either. Just have to keep your fingers crossed
> that it turns out OK.
>

Wot 'e sed.

Tim
 
E

Elyob

Guest
"Dene Wilby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > >
> > > can someone please put my mind at rest on this because it's really shaken me up.
>
> Thanks guys for putting my mind at rest somewhat.

If you call the police and offer yourself as a potential witness, you may then may find out what the
outcome was. Personally, I would like to just take the view that he was probably okay, and get on a
first aid course ASAP. Not sure that a first aid course can do a lot in a cycle/motor accident
except for not moving the cyclist, clearing the airway and stemming any flow of claret.

Am looking into courses in my area right now (I said I'd do this last summer too).

Having just started my commute I have had one major moment (day two), and I'm an experienced urban
cyclist IMO. However I did not realise that the car would go so far to the wrong side of the road to
'jump the traffic', and that's with 35W of lumicycle coming up on the outside. Glad to be on a
bicycle than a motorcycle as it meant I could really manouveur.

I do listen to a radio on my nearside plughole, and know it's a risk, but it's just too fun
listening to all the traffic jams in my area. :) The carjacking on Kingston bridge on Tuesday made
my cycle a joy. I past 100 cars down one main road alone.
 
E

Elyob

Guest
"David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:eek:[email protected]...
> On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:51:45 -0000 someone who may be "Tony Raven" <[email protected]>
> wrote this:-
>
> >I can tell you a little blood goes an unbelievably long way.
>
> Yes. What looks like an axe murder can turn out to be fairly minor. A few thimbles worth of blood
> spread out in an amazing fashion and can often look far worse than they are. Human bodies are
> remarkably tough in many ways, though obviously I have no idea about this incident.
>

Last time I cut my head I just dumped the towel that had been used to keep the pressure on. It was
bloodsoaked, and I just needed 5 stitches ... and a haircut. I was out for a few seconds as well.
The fact that he wasn't moving was probably advice from everyone around. "Don't move until the
ambulance arrives." Good advice. Also "don't remove any helmet unless absolutely neccesary."
 

paradox

New Member
Jun 15, 2003
11
0
0
36
damn i hate when things like that happens. =( poor lad.. hop he's gonna be fine
 
J

Jack Ouzzi

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 19:39:02 +0000, "[Not Responding]"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:21:46 +0000 (UTC), Dene Wilby <[email protected]> wrote:

>As other posters have said, blood in its own right is nothing to get overly worried about. I'm not
>sure the same reassurances can really be offered regarding what the effects might be of getting hit
>by a bus.
>

Of all the vehicles to pick, buses are not the best ............ big, heavy, and low to the
roadway !!

>
>As someone else has pointed out, might be worth getting first aid trained. Having someone on the
>scene when things like this happen can make a real difference. In most cases the difference is
>likely to be someone purely having the confidence to 'manage' the incident and *not* do certain
>things while ensuring the pros are summoned and directed pdq.

Trouble is of course in this stupid litigious world we live in, if you do have to put someone into
the recovery position to obviously save life, but in doing so aggravate a spinal injury, with its
possible consequences, you leave yourself wide open to being sued!!! It's happened ..............

I do appreciate there are 'other ways' to you 'trained medical persons out there, but the above is
just an example !!!

Better off just to manage the scene as 'not responding' suggests

Sad but very true .............
 
M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> Nothing to do with helmets. So long as you phoned 999 your conscience will be clear. You did,
> didn't you.

"I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up the bus driver was already
off the bus and making a call"

Two calls don't get the ambulance there any quicker!

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M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> you leave yourself wide open to being sued!!! It's happened ..............

AFAIK it hasn't happened in this country yet, but then I was told that several years ago! I was told
it has happened in America - has it come over here too?

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Johnb

Guest
Mark Thompson wrote:
>
> > Nothing to do with helmets. So long as you phoned 999 your conscience will be clear. You did,
> > didn't you.
>
> "I carried on cycling and reached for my mobile. By the time I pulled up the bus driver was
> already off the bus and making a call"
>
> Two calls don't get the ambulance there any quicker!

So long as you knew he was calling the ambulance rather than his solicitor or wife.

Two calls to the ambulance are better than none.

John B
 
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