Just starting out cycling, should i go with a road or hybrid bike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Owen1267, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Owen1267

    Owen1267 New Member

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    Hi, I got into cycling this past year at college. I didnt have a car so I used a bike as my only mode of transportation, after a while I started going on longer rides just for the fun of it, like 50 miles a day. The only problem is that I was riding an old mountain bike that was to small for me. So this summer I'm buying a new bike. I cant decide if I should go with a hybrid or a road bike, I figure a road bike would be better for longer rides, which I would do quite often. But I also would use it for riding around campus and around town, and maybe very occasional off road riding, like a packed dirt road, but certainly no mountian biking. Basically Im concerned about the durabilty of a road bike vs. the advantages of having it for longer rides. Any thoughts or experiences you guys have would be greatly appreciated, do you think a road bike can cut it for all around use, or should i go with a hybrid?
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Where are you? Country? Town?

    I would suggest a Hybrid, flat bar, road based, like the Giant CRX#, Felt SR##, Avanti Blade, I have 2...
     
  3. Owen1267

    Owen1267 New Member

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    it would be a small town area, most longer trips would be rural. Also I have another question about the gearing of the different styles. I heard that a hybrid would be geared more like a mountain bike. What exactly are thr differences in gearing and would that make a big difference on longer trips, its definately a hilly area. Also can you recomend a good hybrid for about 400 dollars that is kind of my price range, new or used. Thanks a lot for the help, I really appreciate it.
     
  4. crb189

    crb189 New Member

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    Just be advised that typically (I can't say it's true for all) hybrids place the rider in a more "relaxed" position which hinders pedaling efficiency. Go to the LBS and test ride a few hybrids and take them on 20+ mile trips and see if you like the feel of them on longer rides.
     
  5. StartTday

    StartTday New Member

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    CRB is right... it is a more relaxed position and you definately sacrficie efficiency. Honestly, I think I know what you're looking for. Since you do longer rides (50+ miles) you're going to hate having a hybrid bike. Why not look into a touring or even a cyclocross bike.

    Cyclocross such as a the Lemond Poprad (there are others) sports a steel frame with components made to take a more abuse than a standard road bike. With a cyclocross bike you could ride through mud and on packed dirt.

    Check it out, you might like it.
     
  6. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    I would agree with exploring the cyclocross type bikes. That is what I would do if I didn't already have my comfort bike for the mild off road stuff I envision riding. That is almost definitely the way I would go if I were to have to pick a single bike.

    Instead of trying the flat bar road bikes like someone suggested above, I would opt to try the drop bar. The reason is that with the more efficient position, it should be your choice if you can deal with the positions available to you.

    After a significant test on a drop bar bike, you should have a feel for whether or not you are ready to take that step. If there isn't a good level of confidence in whether you would like the drop bars, then fall back to trying a flat bar road bike. Or start out assuming that you would like to try both.
    :)

    If you try a nice flat bar first, and compare it to what you currently ride, it will seem great and you may not take the opportunity to explore the drop bar options and regret that later. The other way it is less likely, because you have at least given it a try.

    I think either way you can enjoy cycling, just laying out my thoughts.

    Also, I see nothing wrong with starting out assuming that you will buy multiple bikes as you develop your love of riding. :)
     
  7. Bob N.

    Bob N. New Member

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    I'm fairly new to cycling in my adult years and I ended up getting a hybrid because I didn't want to be limited to the type of surface I was riding on. We have rail trails and gravel canal trails around here and my wife had a hybrid so.....

    While the position is comfortable, I can tell that I'm sacrificing speed and manuevering (I'm fairly tall/higher center of gravity). It sounds to me that you want to aim somewhere between the two.....

    My two cents
     
  8. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    Some hybrids are geared more like a mountain bike (e.g. Trek Navigator or Specailized Expedition) and some are more like a road bike (e.g., Trek 7x00 or Specailzed Crossroads). Just try them out until you find one that you like best.

    I went with a hybrid because we ride on many crushed stone and mulched trails. They are not rough enough to need a mountain bike, but I would not be comfortable riding a road bike on them. Thirty years ago I would, but not now.
     
  9. bbattle

    bbattle New Member

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    Check out the Lemond Big Sky bikes.

    "The Big Sky S is designed to give you an enjoyable ride whatever your pace. Push it hard to see what's over the next hill or just take it out for a casual ride. With the heart of a lightweight racing bike and details like a Bontrager saddle with the "Comfort Release Zone," the Big Sky S will shorten even the longest road."

    http://lemondbikes.com/2005_bikes/big_sky_s.shtml

    The Lemond is using 700 x 28c tires and looks more like a road bike than a hybrid.

    The Trek 7x00 FX is leaning more to the comfort side with 700 x 32 tires and a more upright frame geometry.
    http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/City_Bike_Path/Hybrid/FX/7300_FX/index.php

    The Trek 7x00 hybrid is more upright, more for comfort. My wife rides one on pavement and dirt roads. While you could do 30 miles or more on it, it's an "admire the scenery" bike.
    http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/City_Bike_Path/Hybrid/Hybrid/7300/index.php


    Hope these three choices help. Of course, there are many other brands out there making similar bikes.
     
  10. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    That's an interesting bike. I have a Specialized Sequoia which is very similar. Hated the stock saddle though.

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?arc=2004&spid=5963&JServSessionIdroot=tzsi3pt1ry.j27008

    I test rode about 8 road bikes and they all seemed to mash my package and bend me so far forward that it placed stress on my lower back. I don't know how anyone can ride in those positions and actually enjoy riding. Bah! It's no wonder that I'd ridden an MTB for so long prior to getting a road bike.
     
  11. shannons dad

    shannons dad New Member

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    So basically what you want is a mountain bikes durability with a road bikes long distance capabilities? It's a small trend (so far) but here's your answer - http://www.cyclingforums.com/t273172-drop-bars-and-aero-on-a-hybrid---done.html As long as you don't mind the odd stare or two. 5-6 of us have done it already. Entirely up to you.

    Bill.
     
  12. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Oh...Jesus, not that lame crap again.... :rolleyes: If no one has said it yet, the obvious answer is a cross bike . Hybrids blow.
     
  13. shannons dad

    shannons dad New Member

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    It's not really your decision to make. Is it?:p

    Bill.
     
  14. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    Most versatile bike of all is a touring bike. That is like a hybrid but with drop bars. Anything from audax to expedition depending required toughness.
     
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