Just wondering?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Fredzep, Feb 23, 2003.

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  1. Fredzep

    Fredzep Guest

    I have decided to replace the brake and shifter housings and cables on the mountain bike as they are
    in rather sad shape.What I was wondering about were those plastic sleeves that some bikes have on
    the bare cable between the guides.I actually have them on a less expensive rigid fork bike.It would
    seem like a good idea to protect the paint.Do they defeat the pupose of having the cable bare or are
    they just not cool or unnecessary. Would using them be the same as putting reflectors on? Is there a
    valid reason why some bikes have them and others don,t? The bike does not have them and I didn't
    plan on using them.I am just curious about this.

    Thanks for any input. Fredzep
     
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  2. Cameron

    Cameron Guest

    "Fredzep" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have decided to replace the brake and shifter housings and cables on the mountain bike as they
    > are in rather sad shape.What I was wondering about were those plastic sleeves that some bikes have
    > on the bare cable between the guides.I actually have them on a less expensive rigid fork bike.It
    > would seem like a good idea to protect the paint.Do they defeat the pupose of having the cable
    > bare or are they just not cool or unnecessary. Would using them be the same as putting reflectors
    > on? Is there a valid reason why some bikes have them and others don,t? The bike does not have them
    > and I didn't plan on using them.I am just curious about this.
    >
    > Thanks for any input. Fredzep

    Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped over the cables between cable stops.
    If there is a long distance between cable stops on your bike, the donuts would help to keep the
    cable from slapping the frame. Assuming you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated guess, maybe one
    donut for every six inches of exposed cable.
     
  3. Cameron wrote:

    > Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped over the cables between cable
    > stops. If there is a long distance between cable stops on your bike, the donuts would help to keep
    > the cable from slapping the frame. Assuming you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated guess,
    > maybe one donut for every six inches of exposed cable.

    The trouble with the donuts is after the first few rides they all congregate at the rear of the
    top tube. You can push them back up, but they migrate back down. I'm not sure they do much good
    in the end.
     
  4. Cameron

    Cameron Guest

    "Eric Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Cameron wrote:
    >
    > > Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped over the cables between cable
    > > stops. If there is a long distance between cable stops on your bike, the donuts would help to
    > > keep the cable from slapping the frame. Assuming you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated
    > > guess, maybe one donut for every six inches of exposed cable.
    >
    > The trouble with the donuts is after the first few rides they all congregate at the rear of the
    > top tube. You can push them back up, but they migrate back down. I'm not sure they do much good in
    > the end.

    I noticed that, too. Maybe put 50 or 100 on? ;-) Or on an off day you could put a small dab of caulk
    on the cable where the donut(s) sit to keep 'em in place. I might try that.

    --
    Cameron
     
  5. David L

    David L Guest

    "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Eric Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > Cameron wrote:
    > >
    > > > Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped over
    the cables
    > > > between cable stops. If there is a long distance between cable stops
    on your
    > > > bike, the donuts would help to keep the cable from slapping the frame.
    Assuming
    > > > you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated guess, maybe one donut for
    every six
    > > > inches of exposed cable.
    > >
    > > The trouble with the donuts is after the first few rides they all
    congregate at the rear
    > > of the top tube. You can push them back up, but they migrate back down.
    I'm not sure
    > > they do much good in the end.
    >
    > I noticed that, too. Maybe put 50 or 100 on? ;-) Or on an off day you
    could put a small
    > dab of caulk on the cable where the donut(s) sit to keep 'em in place. I
    might try that.
    >

    that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot more on the frame,

    just typing a thought

    > --
    > Cameron
     
  6. Cameron

    Cameron Guest

    "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Eric Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Cameron wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped over
    > the cables
    > > > > between cable stops. If there is a long distance between cable stops
    > on your
    > > > > bike, the donuts would help to keep the cable from slapping the frame.
    > Assuming
    > > > > you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated guess, maybe one donut for
    > every six
    > > > > inches of exposed cable.
    > > >
    > > > The trouble with the donuts is after the first few rides they all
    > congregate at the rear
    > > > of the top tube. You can push them back up, but they migrate back down.
    > I'm not sure
    > > > they do much good in the end.
    > >
    > > I noticed that, too. Maybe put 50 or 100 on? ;-) Or on an off day you
    > could put a small
    > > dab of caulk on the cable where the donut(s) sit to keep 'em in place. I
    > might try that.
    > >
    >
    > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot more on the frame,
    >
    > just typing a thought
    >

    Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube. Unsightly, to say the least.

    --
    Cameron
     
  7. Fredzep

    Fredzep Guest

    "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Eric Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Cameron wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > Typically you'll find rubber or nylon 'donuts' that are slipped
    over
    > > the cables
    > > > > > between cable stops. If there is a long distance between cable
    stops
    > > on your
    > > > > > bike, the donuts would help to keep the cable from slapping the
    frame.
    > > Assuming
    > > > > > you ride in rough terrain. Just an educated guess, maybe one donut
    for
    > > every six
    > > > > > inches of exposed cable.
    > > > >
    > > > > The trouble with the donuts is after the first few rides they all
    > > congregate at the rear
    > > > > of the top tube. You can push them back up, but they migrate back
    down.
    > > I'm not sure
    > > > > they do much good in the end.
    > > >
    > > > I noticed that, too. Maybe put 50 or 100 on? ;-) Or on an off day you
    > > could put a small
    > > > dab of caulk on the cable where the donut(s) sit to keep 'em in place.
    I
    > > might try that.
    > > >
    > >
    > > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot more
    on
    > > the frame,
    > >
    > > just typing a thought
    > >
    >
    > Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube. Unsightly,
    to
    > say the least.
    >
    > --
    > Cameron
    >
    >
    I have those donut things and they all ride to the back making them useless.They used to stay in
    place much better when they were newer so I'll probably just replace them. I cross posted on another
    ng and they explained the reason for the donuts over the sleeves is so that you could slide the
    housings around for maintenance.

    Fredzep
     
  8. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Cameron <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...

    > > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot more
    on
    > > the frame,
    > >
    > > just typing a thought
    > >
    >
    > Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube. Unsightly,
    to
    > say the least.

    Aye, but you can get these little clear sticky plastic things that you stick to the frame underneath
    'em to stop that. As for me, well, I just been using the little clear sticky tabs off packets of
    Golden Virginia tobaco ',;~}

    Shaun aRe - You callin me tight fisted?....
     
  9. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Cameron <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot more
    > on
    > > > the frame,
    > > >
    > > > just typing a thought
    > > >
    > >
    > > Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube.
    Unsightly,
    > to
    > > say the least.
    >
    > Aye, but you can get these little clear sticky plastic things that you
    stick
    > to the frame underneath 'em to stop that. As for me, well, I just been
    using
    > the little clear sticky tabs off packets of Golden Virginia tobaco ',;~}

    I got some clear vinyl from the local motorbike shop. It's specifically for covering petrol tanks
    and fairings to stop scratches and unsightly stone chips. I wrapped the top tube and down tubes on
    my bike when it was shiny new to stop major paint damage. I also put some appropriately shaped bits
    where cables rub. But having said that, I just keep pushing the donuts back into place when I notice
    that they've moved. A migrating 7mm black rubber donut is not a major issue in my book and not worth
    agonising too much about. If it's paint damage that you're worried about, look at where cable
    housings rub against the frame.

    Westie

    >
    > Shaun aRe - You callin me tight fisted?....
    >
    >
     
  10. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Westie <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Cameron <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot
    more
    > > on
    > > > > the frame,
    > > > >
    > > > > just typing a thought
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube.
    > Unsightly,
    > > to
    > > > say the least.
    > >
    > > Aye, but you can get these little clear sticky plastic things that you
    > stick
    > > to the frame underneath 'em to stop that. As for me, well, I just been
    > using
    > > the little clear sticky tabs off packets of Golden Virginia tobaco ',;~}
    >
    > I got some clear vinyl from the local motorbike shop. It's specifically
    for
    > covering petrol tanks and fairings to stop scratches and unsightly stone chips. I wrapped the top
    > tube and down tubes on my bike when it was shiny new to stop major paint damage. I also put some
    > appropriately shaped bits where cables rub. But having said that, I just keep pushing the donuts
    back
    > into place when I notice that they've moved. A migrating 7mm black rubber donut is not a major
    > issue in my book and not worth agonising too much about. If it's paint damage that you're worried
    > about, look at where
    cable
    > housings rub against the frame.
    >
    > Westie

    I thought that's what I was talking about? Heh, I musta been wrong......

    ',;~}

    Shaun aRe
     
  11. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Westie <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > Cameron <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > "David L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > "Cameron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > > > that may work, but the problem is then the "donut" will rub a lot
    > more
    > > > on
    > > > > > the frame,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > just typing a thought
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Couldn't be any worse than cable housing rubbing the head tube.
    > > Unsightly,
    > > > to
    > > > > say the least.
    > > >
    > > > Aye, but you can get these little clear sticky plastic things that you
    > > stick
    > > > to the frame underneath 'em to stop that. As for me, well, I just been
    > > using
    > > > the little clear sticky tabs off packets of Golden Virginia tobaco
    ',;~}
    > >
    > > I got some clear vinyl from the local motorbike shop. It's specifically
    > for
    > > covering petrol tanks and fairings to stop scratches and unsightly stone chips. I wrapped the
    > > top tube and down tubes on my bike when it was
    shiny
    > > new to stop major paint damage. I also put some appropriately shaped
    bits
    > > where cables rub. But having said that, I just keep pushing the donuts
    > back
    > > into place when I notice that they've moved. A migrating 7mm black
    rubber
    > > donut is not a major issue in my book and not worth agonising too much about. If it's paint
    > > damage that you're worried about, look at where
    > cable
    > > housings rub against the frame.
    > >
    > > Westie
    >
    > I thought that's what I was talking about? Heh, I musta been wrong......
    >
    > ',;~}
    >
    > Shaun aRe

    Shaun, few of us understand anything that you're talking about. And I won't even risk taking a guess
    to whether or not you know what you're talking about. ;-)

    Westie
     
  12. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Westie <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    > > I thought that's what I was talking about? Heh, I musta been wrong......
    > >
    > > ',;~}
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    >
    > Shaun, few of us understand anything that you're talking about. And I won't even risk taking a
    > guess to whether or not you know what
    you're
    > talking about. ;-)

    Aye, that's as maybe, most being stoopit, but I had you figured as one of the smarter folks
    here ',;~P````

    Shaun aRe
     
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