keep the old feet warm need some help.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Steve Knight, Oct 31, 2003.

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  1. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear thick socks. any ideas? hopefully something that
    does not cost an arm or a leg?

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
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  2. Golightly F.

    Golightly F. Guest

    "Steve Knight" <[email protected]>
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > are not going to be enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear
    thick
    > socks. any ideas? hopefully something that does not cost an arm or a leg?

    I use plastic baggies... they take up no space at all and make it easier to get your shoes on. Plus,
    they do a good job of keeping the cold air off your toes.

    hth
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Steve Knight
    <[email protected]> writes:
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    > enough.

    I think they will, unless you mean -40F.

    Don't underestimate neoprene. It'll keep the wind off your feet, and it has a lot of dead air
    built-in for insulation.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Neoprene booties work fine for me down into the mid 20s F. When my feet do get cold, it is because
    air gets in around the cleat opening on the sole. Also, it is best to plug any ventilation holes,
    such as those in Carnac Legends, in the soles of your shoes

    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Jim Artherholt
    [email protected] "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Steve Knight
    > <[email protected]> writes:
    > > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > > are not going to be enough.
    >
    > I think they will, unless you mean -40F.
    >
    > Don't underestimate neoprene. It'll keep the wind off your feet, and it has a lot of dead air
    > built-in for insulation.
    >
    >
    > cheers, Tom
    >
    > --
    > -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    > [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I live and ride in coastal South Carolina so freezing weather is exceptional. I carefully rode
    through last winter whild working on just this kind of question; how to use my riding clothes best
    to keep warm.

    I ride in $imano SPD sandals, normally bare footed. Wool/micro-fiber boot-socks are adequate down
    through the 40Fs. Below that I used neoprene diving-booties as 'socks' inside my sandals. They were
    comfortable down into the mid-20Fs - the coldest weather that we normally get.

    Try neoprene socks.

    Re your planes. I have a Stanley Multi-plane that I need to finish restoring.

    "Steve Knight" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > are not going to be enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear
    thick
    > socks. any ideas? hopefully something that does not cost an arm or a leg?
    >
    > --
    > Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    > http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  6. Eric

    Eric Guest

    I've had good luck with ski socks and an older pair of shoes that have streched out over the years.
    Keeps the good ones clean as a bonus.

    The nice thing about the ski socks is that they are thicker in the front, knee high and padded
    on the bottom. this helps keep the wind off my shins and the cold transfering from the cleat
    off my feet.

    Don't forget a hat and gloves, either.

    Eric

    Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    > enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear thick socks. any ideas? hopefully something that
    > does not cost an arm or a leg?
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Steve Knight" wrote
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > are not going to be enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear
    thick
    > socks. any ideas? hopefully something that does not cost an arm or a leg?
    >
    > --
    > Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    > http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.

    I've used neoprene shoe covers (and thin liner socks inside my shoes) down to 0 deg F with good
    results. The important thing is to keep the rest of your body, especially the head and neck, warm
    and protected from the wind.
    --
    mark
     
  8. R.White

    R.White Guest

    Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    > enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear thick socks. any ideas? hopefully something that
    > does not cost an arm or a leg?

    I ride every winter with platform pedals and insulated duck boots. They are not as "efficient" as
    clipless and I'm not getting "maximum power", but I never have to cut a ride short due to cold feet.
     
  9. On Sat, 01 Nov 2003 04:52:53 +0000, Steve Knight wrote:

    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    > enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear thick socks. any ideas?

    Well, thicker socks can certainly help. I like the Polar Tek socks, but they are hard to find
    for some reason. Wool would also be good. Another trick is to put a plastic bag over your toes.
    Does wonders.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass. _`\(,_ | What are you on?"
    --Lance Armstrong (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. Doug Purdy

    Doug Purdy Guest

    "Steve Knight" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > are not going to be enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear
    thick
    > socks. any ideas? hopefully something that does not cost an arm or a leg?

    There are many different types of neoprene booties, shoe covers, to covers, etc. Almost all of them
    are fine for me to freezing. Check out more of them and you should find something warmer. As it gets
    down farther below freezing I layer the neoprene covers.

    I experimented with many types of sock but none of them seem to make anywhere near as much warmth
    difference as any of the neoprene covers. But a good heavy pair of wool hiking sock are really
    comfortable if your winter shoes are a bit large.

    For far below freezing hiking or even snowmobile boots may be in order.

    Doug Toronto
     
  11. "Steve Knight" wrote:
    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40
    they
    > are not going to be enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear
    thick
    > socks. any ideas? hopefully something that does not cost an arm or a leg?

    Neoprene booties should be good down to about 30F for most folks. If you don't want to get roomier
    shoes, you could try "toe warmers." These are pads that attach to your socks and generate heat by
    chemical action. They help some and last around 4 hours. You can get them at outdoor and hunting
    shops such as EMS. See: http://www.ems.com/products/product_detail.jsp;jsessionid=1krGi9ivntYRxFCCu-
    OidvCtIFex5F9rHQC37ZBvssY8dMV71A2Zj!-1366777571!174391831!7005!8005!519421413!174391830!7005!8005?P-
    RODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524442032299&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302325043&fromTemplate=navigation%2-
    Fsubcategory.jsp&bmUID=1067723590866

    Art Harris
     
  12. John Foltz

    John Foltz Guest

    Steve Knight wrote:

    > well warm and dry. I have a pair of neoprene overs but I think below 40 they are not going to be
    > enough. my road shoes fit snugly so i can't wear thick socks. any ideas? hopefully something that
    > does not cost an arm or a leg?
    >
    Another trick I've heard - Vick's vapor rub on your feet. The grease would help insulate your feet
    and the menthol stimulates blood flow.

    Personally, I use the catalytic toe warmers, neoprene toe covers, and when it gets *really* cold, I
    get rid of the shoes with the steel bits in the sole. A pair of Thinsulate-insulated work boots keep
    my feet pretty warm for as long as the rest of me is willing to be out in the elements.

    --

    John Foltz --- O _ Baron --- _O _ V-Rex 24 --- _\\/\-%)
    _________(_)`=()___________________(_)= (_)_____
     
  13. Doug Purdy

    Doug Purdy Guest

    "mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The important thing is to keep the rest of your body, especially the head and neck, warm and
    > protected from the wind.

    I believe there is some truth to this. I used to like to ride cold so I would sweat very little. My
    feet and hands always felt colder to me than other riders described their own sensations. Last year
    I tried dressing warmer all over and didn't have any cold hand or problems. I think the warmer
    underwear made some of that difference.

    And last week my bare hands & head felt fine in 8C/46F rain while my chest & legs were dressed for
    freezing. I didn't feel overheated although I sweat a lot. Others have said you can overheat one
    part of your body to make up for another part. It seems like it could be true.

    Also feeling warmer on the body I seem to feel feel more like riding hard, like I would in warm
    weather so I get a more intense ride.

    Doug Toronto
     
  14. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Doug Purdy wrote:

    >"mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>The important thing is to keep the rest of your body, especially the head and neck, warm and
    >>protected from the wind.
    >>
    >
    >I believe there is some truth to this. I used to like to ride cold so I would sweat very little. My
    >feet and hands always felt colder to me than other riders described their own sensations. Last year
    >I tried dressing warmer all over and didn't have any cold hand or problems. I think the warmer
    >underwear made some of that difference.
    >
    >And last week my bare hands & head felt fine in 8C/46F rain while my chest & legs were dressed for
    >freezing. I didn't feel overheated although I sweat a lot. Others have said you can overheat one
    >part of your body to make up for another part. It seems like it could be true.
    >
    >Also feeling warmer on the body I seem to feel feel more like riding hard, like I would in warm
    >weather so I get a more intense ride.
    >
    >Doug Toronto
    >
    >
    Hikers used to say "Your feet are cold? Put on a hat!" Bernie
     
  15. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    thanks all in portland I don't think it will get real cold. seldom does it stay freezing much. my
    feet at 40 are ok but the toes are a bit chilly. all it really does is make the shoe uncomfortable.
    I bet coolmax socks would do it. hell anything I wear of coolmax roasts me. I can wear a cool max
    long sleeve shirt and my burly rain coat with all vents open at 42 and keep plenty warm and sweat
    some too. seems my feet get colder then even my bare hands.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Doug Purdy wrote:
    >
    > >"mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>The important thing is to keep the rest of your body, especially the head and neck, warm and
    > >>protected from the wind.
    > >>
    > >
    > >I believe there is some truth to this. I used to like to ride cold so I would sweat very little.
    > >My feet and hands always felt colder to me than other riders described their own sensations. Last
    > >year I tried dressing warmer all over and didn't have any cold hand or problems. I think the
    > >warmer underwear made some of that difference.
    > >
    > >And last week my bare hands & head felt fine in 8C/46F rain while my chest & legs were dressed
    > >for freezing. I didn't feel overheated although I sweat a lot. Others have said you can overheat
    > >one part of your body to make up for another part. It seems like it could be true.
    > >
    > >Also feeling warmer on the body I seem to feel feel more like riding hard, like I would in warm
    > >weather so I get a more intense ride.
    > >
    > >Doug Toronto
    > >
    > >
    > Hikers used to say "Your feet are cold? Put on a hat!" Bernie

    Hikers say all kinds of stupid things, don't they? They have some of the right idea here, but
    cycling tends to freeze extremities because they're not doing a lot of work. While your feet are
    connected to the pedals, they're not actually doing much down there, and probably need to be dressed
    a little better than the rest of your body. Similarly, I find the need to "overdress" hands because
    they're out in the wind and not doing much work.

    Core temperature is important, but it tends to take care of itself on a bike. In Vancouver I would
    rarely consider more than a jersey, arm warmers, and a second shell garment. Sometimes I use an ugly
    yellow fleece over my jersey, which does nothing to cut wind but still keeps me reasonably warm.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  17. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Doug Purdy wrote:
    >>
    >>>"mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>>The important thing is to keep the rest of your body, especially the head and neck, warm and
    >>>>protected from the wind.
    >>>>
    >>>I believe there is some truth to this. I used to like to ride cold so I would sweat very little.
    >>>My feet and hands always felt colder to me than other riders described their own sensations. Last
    >>>year I tried dressing warmer all over and didn't have any cold hand or problems. I think the
    >>>warmer underwear made some of that difference.
    >>>
    >>>And last week my bare hands & head felt fine in 8C/46F rain while my chest & legs were dressed
    >>>for freezing. I didn't feel overheated although I sweat a lot. Others have said you can overheat
    >>>one part of your body to make up for another part. It seems like it could be true.
    >>>
    >>>Also feeling warmer on the body I seem to feel feel more like riding hard, like I would in warm
    >>>weather so I get a more intense ride.
    >>>
    >>>Doug Toronto
    >>>
    >>>
    >>Hikers used to say "Your feet are cold? Put on a hat!" Bernie
    >>
    >
    >Hikers say all kinds of stupid things, don't they? They have some of the right idea here, but
    >cycling tends to freeze extremities because they're not doing a lot of work. While your feet are
    >connected to the pedals, they're not actually doing much down there, and probably need to be
    >dressed a little better than the rest of your body. Similarly, I find the need to "overdress" hands
    >because they're out in the wind and not doing much work.
    >
    >Core temperature is important, but it tends to take care of itself on a bike. In Vancouver I
    >would rarely consider more than a jersey, arm warmers, and a second shell garment. Sometimes I
    >use an ugly yellow fleece over my jersey, which does nothing to cut wind but still keeps me
    >reasonably warm.
    >
    The hiker's quote does work if you are walking. Heat loss thru the head is fairly high. If you abate
    that heat loss, you will warm the extremities somewhat. I've been wearing (and continue to wear)
    "ragg wool" gloves for cold weather rides - from KMart or Zellers or ... They are lined with a thin
    yellow foamy material. Dunnow what it is, but it insulates just about right for the west coast
    temperatures, and is warm and comfortable even when soaking wet. They don't have them in store so
    far this year, and I need another pair.
    PS: they are dirt cheap, like $5 cad. I tend to dress "light" when I ride too, but carry a wool
    pullover to wear under my wind/rain jacket when stopped, or when I'm just tired and feeling the
    chill. Be careful out there, cold can do harm. Regards, Bernie
     
  18. Tim McTeague

    Tim McTeague Guest

  19. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > thanks all in portland I don't think it will get real cold. seldom does it stay freezing much. my
    > feet at 40 are ok but the toes are a bit chilly. all it really does is make the shoe
    > uncomfortable. I bet coolmax socks would do it. hell anything I wear of coolmax roasts me. I can
    > wear a cool max long sleeve shirt and my burly rain coat with all vents open at 42 and keep plenty
    > warm and sweat some too. seems my feet get colder then even my bare hands.

    1. i bought a pair of closeout 45-USD shoes, oversized to wear w/ thick wool socks. (now is a good
    time to score a off season pair.) not stated in the earlier posts is that the last thing you
    want to do it stuff thick socks & your foot into your normal shoe: the blood vessels are close
    to the skin & the tight fit will restrict flow, making the foot colder. i think i have the same
    problem w/ my neoprene socks, slightly too snug on my foot.

    2. i've rarely use (1). i usually use Shimano sandals w/ GoreTex socks & maybe wool socks.
    "ShimaNO!" N/A here.

    3. baby oil your skin. great stuff to keep you warm.
     
  20. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    >1. i bought a pair of closeout 45-USD shoes, oversized to wear w/ thick wool socks. (now is a good
    > time to score a off season pair.) not stated in the earlier posts is that the last thing you
    > want to do it stuff thick socks & your foot into your normal shoe: the blood vessels are close
    > to the skin & the tight fit will restrict flow, making the foot colder. i think i have the same
    > problem w/ my neoprene socks, slightly too snug on my foot.
    >
    good idea. but not sure i can afford it. I still need more bibs I only have one pair.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
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