keeping cool on afternoon commutes

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by asterope, Nov 22, 2006.

  1. asterope

    asterope New Member

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    alright, so ive properly started commuting to work every day (because my scooter got a puncture and i cant be bothered getting it fixed) and the past two days have been ridiculously hot for riding... i know that 28 degrees is not that bad and its only going to get worse as summer comes along, so the question i put to you all now is...

    How does one keep cool when commuting during the hottest part of the day? i feel bad about pouring the contents of my water bottle on myself, id rather it go on my vege garden, but if its the only way...
     
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  2. Paulie-AU

    Paulie-AU New Member

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    Slog it out for the first week or so. Your body will adapt.....painfully.

    There is nothing worse than sitting at a traffic light with the sun belting down. I hate it with a passion.
     
  3. On 2006-11-23, asterope <[email protected]> wrote:
    > How does one keep cool when commuting during the hottest part of the
    > day? i feel bad about pouring the contents of my water bottle on
    > myself, id rather it go on my vege garden, but if its the only way...


    Just keep drinking water. You drink => it becomes perspiration =>
    perspiration keeps you cool. Unless it's humid, in which case all bets
    are off anyway.

    --
    My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
    the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
     
  4. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

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    Don't pour it on you...drink it. Staying hydrated is the best thing...and don't ride too hard. Take it easy until you acclimatise to the heat.
     
  5. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Not forgetting, if you start to feel like shit, ie: getting a headache, feeling dizzy, completely disorientated or agitated, dry skin with no sweat etc, please stop riding immediately and seek assistance! I've stupidly ignored these symptoms before, and resumed consciousness in a strange place, attached to IV drip. :(
     
  6. Moike

    Moike Guest

    asterope wrote:
    > alright, so ive properly started commuting to work every day (because my
    > scooter got a puncture and i cant be bothered getting it fixed) and the
    > past two days have been ridiculously hot for riding... i know that 28
    > degrees is not that bad and its only going to get worse as summer comes
    > along, so the question i put to you all now is...
    >
    > How does one keep cool when commuting during the hottest part of the
    > day? i feel bad about pouring the contents of my water bottle on
    > myself, id rather it go on my vege garden, but if its the only way...
    >
    >

    A legionnaires-cap type flap on the back of your helmet to shade the
    back of your head and neck, a peak on the front (I sacrificed an old cap
    and used velcro to attach it to the helmet).

    I also make use of one of those cotton sausage scarves filled with
    water-retaining gel. They help to cool the neck in the heat.

    Moike
     
  7. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Stuart Lamble wrote:
    > On 2006-11-23, asterope <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > How does one keep cool when commuting during the hottest part of the
    > > day? i feel bad about pouring the contents of my water bottle on
    > > myself, id rather it go on my vege garden, but if its the only way...

    >
    > Just keep drinking water. You drink => it becomes perspiration =>
    > perspiration keeps you cool.



    Up to a point this is good advice, *except* that if you drink too much,
    you can make yourself very sick (and even, in extreme cases, die). I'm
    not sure of amount, but it's suprisingly little that your body can
    actually absorb before you start to have salt issues. Hyponatremia is
    the term, and it's real.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyponatremia
    and
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication

    It's not likely on a short commute though... but things like the Alpine
    etc, that's another story.

    I limit myself to no more than 2 biddons an hour (~1.5litres) with some
    salts (I use staminade, it has magnesium in it as well as sodium and
    potassium) and anymore than that gets poured over me, and then
    evaporates, bypassing the chance to leech salt out of my blood.
     
  8. adam85

    adam85 New Member

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    Pouring some through your helmet vents while on the move works for me when it's really hot, it doesn't need to be a whole heap. So much heat gets radiated out through your head. Try it out Asterope, then keep your HR constant and watch your power output go up on that SRM powermeter you've got :)
     
  9. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    > Walrus Wrote:
    > > Don't pour it on you...drink it. Staying hydrated is the best
    > > thing...and don't ride too hard. Take it easy until you acclimatise to
    > > the heat.

    >
    > Not forgetting, if you start to feel like shit, ie: getting a headache,
    > feeling dizzy, completely disorientated or agitated, dry skin with no
    > sweat etc, please stop riding immediately and seek assistance! I've
    > stupidly ignored these symptoms before, and resumed consciousness in a
    > strange place, attached to IV drip. :(


    yep, very good advice. I had this myself a couple of years ago, but
    didn't end up with heat stroke, just heat exhaustion (still had a trip
    to A&E in an ambulance though ...)

    http://www.aboc.com.au/tips-and-hints/training-in-hot-weather/

    That's a little out of date, but the symptoms & signs are still the
    same.
     
  10. Donga

    Donga Guest

    Carefully plan your rides, so that you end up in a swimming pool.
    :)

    Donga
     
  11. In aus.bicycle on 22 Nov 2006 21:53:43 -0800
    Donga <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Carefully plan your rides, so that you end up in a swimming pool.
    >:)
    >


    What, you saying she should become a triathlete?

    Zebee
     
  12. "Walrus" wrote:

    >Don't pour it on you...drink it. Staying hydrated is the best
    > thing...and don't ride too hard. Take it easy until you acclimatise to
    > the heat.


    However if you judiciously keep pouring water on you, to keep cool you sweat
    less. Thus you lose less water and avoid dehydration. On top of that you
    don't sweat out your eloctrolytes, with all the risks that entails. Keep
    your shirt permanently wet on a hot day and ride easy - then you'll arrive
    home feeling better. This is a bit hard if you commute in work clothes
    (casual, not a suit!) as I do - after 10kms on a hot day I just tear of the
    shirt, throw it in the wash and douse myself with the hose.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  13. Peter Signorini wrote:
    >
    > However if you judiciously keep pouring water on you, to keep cool you sweat
    > less. Thus you lose less water and avoid dehydration.


    Hey, it worked for Flandis, right???!!!

    Now, where do I put these patches... Hmmm - do I have to shave first??

    Cheers,
    Abby
     
  14. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]forums.cyclingforums.com>,
    asterope <[email protected]> wrote:

    > alright, so ive properly started commuting to work every day (because my
    > scooter got a puncture and i cant be bothered getting it fixed) and the
    > past two days have been ridiculously hot for riding... i know that 28
    > degrees is not that bad and its only going to get worse as summer comes
    > along, so the question i put to you all now is...


    December is already summer.

    > How does one keep cool when commuting during the hottest part of the
    > day? i feel bad about pouring the contents of my water bottle on
    > myself, id rather it go on my vege garden, but if its the only way...


    Ride slower, drop a few gears, take it easy, stay well hydrated, avoid
    sunburn (this will really get you burning).
    --
     
  15. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Up to a point this is good advice, *except* that if you drink too much,
    > you can make yourself very sick (and even, in extreme cases, die). I'm
    > not sure of amount, but it's suprisingly little that your body can
    > actually absorb before you start to have salt issues. Hyponatremia is
    > the term, and it's real.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyponatremia
    > and
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
    >
    > It's not likely on a short commute though... but things like the Alpine
    > etc, that's another story.
    >
    > I limit myself to no more than 2 biddons an hour (~1.5litres) with some
    > salts (I use staminade, it has magnesium in it as well as sodium and
    > potassium) and anymore than that gets poured over me, and then
    > evaporates, bypassing the chance to leech salt out of my blood.


    Very true entity.

    On longer rides, it makes sense to have one bottle with those salty
    water and the other just plain water. The longer the ride, the more salt
    replacement is required. So it's worthwhile to regulate accordingly.
    --
     
  16. Donga

    Donga Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on 22 Nov 2006 21:53:43 -0800
    > Donga <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Carefully plan your rides, so that you end up in a swimming pool.
    > >:)
    > >

    >
    > What, you saying she should become a triathlete?
    >
    > Zebee


    Hehehe. My mum said if I couldn't think of something nice to say, say
    nothing.
    ;-)
    Donga
     
  17. asterope

    asterope New Member

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    Donga would have to be the second person to suggest that to me today... i love the bike bit, like the swim bit but im not at all keen on the running bit... neither are my knees. plus i totally suck at all 3... I think i'll pass.

    put some gatorade in my bidon today for a change and found it made alot of difference during and especially after my commute to work. felt much less worn out when i got there. coming home after midnight and having the entire road to myself was awesome as usual :D I may have to figure out a way to put a second bottle on my frame so i can have one for salty drinks and one for water/head-vent-water-cooling-system :D

    thanks for all the suggestions :D
     
  18. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 24 Nov 2006 07:40:46 +1100
    Ray <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>

    > I also have a personal aversion to any temperature near or above body
    > temperature, especially as you will have to stop at times and cooling
    > becomes essentially non existent.


    Haven't had to do it yet, no doubt it's coming.

    When I used to commute in such temps I found lots of stopping and
    resting in the shade helped.

    Was a right pain that going home was all uphill!

    Zebee
     
  19. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-11-23, Absent Husband (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > Peter Signorini wrote:
    >>
    >> However if you judiciously keep pouring water on you, to keep cool you sweat
    >> less. Thus you lose less water and avoid dehydration.

    >
    > Hey, it worked for Flandis, right???!!!


    Yeah, but so did having a team car with 70 bidons of water.

    I want a team car.

    > Now, where do I put these patches... Hmmm - do I have to shave first??


    You don't *have* to. I'm sure some people are *into* that kind of thing!

    --
    TimC
    An optimist thinks we are living in the best of all possible worlds. A
    pessimist fears this is true. --unknown
     
  20. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-11-23, Zebee Johnstone (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 24 Nov 2006 07:40:46 +1100
    > Ray <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>

    >> I also have a personal aversion to any temperature near or above body
    >> temperature, especially as you will have to stop at times and cooling
    >> becomes essentially non existent.

    >
    > Haven't had to do it yet, no doubt it's coming.
    >
    > When I used to commute in such temps I found lots of stopping and
    > resting in the shade helped.
    >
    > Was a right pain that going home was all uphill!


    Both ways! In the snow! No wait, that doesn't work here, does it?

    I suspect my oxygen intake would be somewhat diminished if I rode
    today -- a bit smokey around. I didn't even know there was a fire in
    Kaputar until one of the NPWS guys in the pub lastnight said he was
    down in Lithgow, then got called back up to fight these ones. It's
    been blazing for weeks already.

    --
    TimC
    "The application did not fail successfully because of an error"
     
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