Keeping dry during rain

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Justdo, Apr 29, 2003.

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  1. Justdo

    Justdo Guest

    Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.
     
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  2. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    > first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    > semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.

    I'm all in favor of the inventive spirit. However(I love that word!), the combination of a light
    weight single track vehicle and large surface area is likely to provide some dramatic moments when
    wind gusts are applied. Such wind gusts can be provided by passing cars.

    --
    Ted Bennett Portland OR
     
  3. "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day.
    1.fenders w/ mudflaps
    2. Burley Rapid Rider jacket and helmet cover.
    3. Gaiters and water proof shoes or SPD sandals and water proof socks.

    Regards, Larry
     
  4. justdo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    >first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    >semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.

    This sounds like a complicated way to reinvent the cycling cape.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Distortion Field!
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lawrence Fieman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day.
    > 1.fenders w/ mudflaps
    > 2. Burley Rapid Rider jacket and helmet cover.
    > 3. Gaiters and water proof shoes or SPD sandals and water proof socks.
    >
    > Regards, Larry

    Just to elaborate, if you don't already have good, full-coverage fenders, this will make a
    surprising difference in how dry you stay. You still need to get some decent rain clothing to stay
    dry, but when your tires aren't churning every piece of road crap and water onto your back and front
    sides, you and your bike stay much drier and more comfy.

    20 mm tires, Esge fenders,
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  6. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    A rain coat will be may vote for the simplest gadget!

    --
    - Zilla (Remove XSPAM)

    "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    > first thought was to have two horizontal
    extension
    > bar in front and the back connected by two semi-circular frame and cover
    it
    > over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.
     
  7. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Fenders and mud flap on the front. Otherwise I dress down and just get wet, or in the cold wear my
    Gortex windbreaker.

    Water just cools you, saving you sweat. It's stuff off the road that's unpleasant.

    The other unpleasant situation is a very light mist, where the visor under your helmet can't keep
    it off your glasses even though nothing else is getting wet (a decent rain takes out mist and
    fixes it).
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  8. Bill Putnam

    Bill Putnam Guest

    "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    > first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    > semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.

    Issues of stability in crosswinds aside, one basic problem with staying dry while riding in the
    rain is that even if you shield yourself from falling rain, the relative humidity is high when it's
    raining and you are going to sweat. So your clothes will get damp while riding in the rain.
    Fenders, a good quality rain suit and booties are what I use to remain relatively unsoaked while
    riding in the rain.

    Bill Putnam, who hasn't melted yet from riding in the rain
     
  9. Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    <cut>

    > The other unpleasant situation is a very light mist, where the visor under your helmet can't keep
    > it off your glasses even though nothing else is getting wet (a decent rain takes out mist and
    > fixes it).

    My glasses (prescription rather than sun) become useless in just about any wet weather, rain or
    mist. I use skiing goggles to keep rain and mist off my glasses.

    The original poster could try this device (raingo canopy):

    http://www.alternatives.com/ultimate/jpg_gallery.html

    I've never tried it so I don't know how loud other road users will laugh when you pass by.
     
  10. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    Put fenders on your bike, if it doesn't already have them. Buy a Carradice rain cape and shoe
    covers, and you're all set.
     
  11. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Put fenders on your bike, if it doesn't already have them. Buy a Carradice rain cape and shoe
    > covers, and you're all set.

    Man, nix the cape. The less flapping the better.

    I have ridden in the rain almost everyday for the last month (we're setting records). It sucks, and
    there is nothing that will keep you dry for very long. I use a Burley jacket, booties (Sidetrack),
    medium-weight tights pulled over the top cuff of my booties, poly-pro t-shirt, synthetic jersey,
    synthetic shortie socks. On fast rides, I would prefer a closer fitting water resistant/breathable
    jacket like some of the offerings from Santini or Exteondo coupled with a wind resistant vest or
    jacket that I could put on for down hills. The Burley is a good all around jacket, athough it is a
    bit flappy. Fenders are a must, and booties are the single most important piece of clothing to me
    because shoes and socks take so long to dry at work. I have a shoe dryer at home. -- Jay Beattie.
     
  12. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

  13. Richard Ney

    Richard Ney Guest

    Tim McNamara writes:

    > Put fenders on your bike, if it doesn't already have them. Buy a Carradice rain cape and shoe
    > covers, and you're all set

    A rain cape!

    Now I've heard it all.
     
  14. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Put fenders on your bike, if it doesn't already have them. Buy a Carradice rain cape and shoe
    > > covers, and you're all set.
    >
    > Man, nix the cape. The less flapping the better.
    >
    > I have ridden in the rain almost everyday for the last month (we're setting records). It sucks,
    > and there is nothing that will keep you dry for very long.

    The Carradice cape does, because it's hugely better ventilated than a jacket. Keps most of the bike
    dry as well. Of course, you don't want to be trying to time trial in a rain cape (or riding into a
    strong headwind).
     
  15. Bt

    Bt Guest

    I got the idea when I was in Thailand where they have tricycle taxi (toto as they are call).
    Passengers are keep dry in a small compartment by lowering transparent sheets and still able to
    enjoy the view. Its very close to the picture shown in the link. It seem like a very practical kind
    of urban travelling although I have not thought of the factors like crosswind, sweat, mist, etc.

    "Andrew Webster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > <cut>
    >
    > > The other unpleasant situation is a very light mist, where the visor under your helmet can't
    > > keep it off your glasses even though nothing else is getting wet (a decent rain takes out mist
    > > and fixes it).
    >
    > My glasses (prescription rather than sun) become useless in just about any wet weather, rain or
    > mist. I use skiing goggles to keep rain and mist off my glasses.
    >
    > The original poster could try this device (raingo canopy):
    >
    > http://www.alternatives.com/ultimate/jpg_gallery.html
    >
    > I've never tried it so I don't know how loud other road users will laugh when you pass by.
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    >first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    >semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.

    Fenders help alot in that they keep the water kicked up by the tires from gettin you wet.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >>
    >>Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    >>first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    >>semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.
    >
    > Fenders help alot in that they keep the water kicked up by the tires from gettin you wet.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
    >
    >

    The only way I know to keep dry on the bike is to stay at home when it's raining.

    AC

    --
    <<|
    | http://www.acampbell.org.uk/cycling/
    _________ ,___o / \ __________ _\ <;_ / \ OCD Cycloclimbing ___________ (_)/ (_) / \
    http://www.ocd.org.uk
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  18. Lawrence Flemen wrote:

    "3. Gaiters and water proof shoes or SPD sandals and water proof socks. Regards, Larry"

    In my commuting experience, there is no way to keep your shoes dry in the rain, unless you ride
    plain pedals with no toe clips, or clipless mechanism's of any kind.

    The clipless type need a hole for the cleat to engage the pedal, and that lets in water, and toe
    clips eventually wear off the waterproof coating (or your shoes do from the inside).

    The BEST way is to get some waterproof sock covers, or make some with some plastic bags (make sure
    they don't leak), and forget about keeping the shoes dry. Just change into a dry pair at work.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  19. "justdo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyone has any good ideal how to modify a commuter bike to keep the rider dry during rainy day. My
    > first thought was to have two horizontal extension bar in front and the back connected by two
    > semi-circular frame and cover it over with transparent sheet much like those scooters.

    Your feet are the most important part of your body to keep dry especially in cold weather. You will
    be able to deal with other parts of your body wet and cold, but with frozen, wet feet you cannot
    ride. Your head should stick out of the top for better wind turbulence stability.It is difficult to
    see thru transparent material if it is wet. Use a helmet with a large baseball cap style visor.
    Maybe you could just cover your lower body with your tent thing and wear a gore-tex rain coat on
    top. Lots of water comes from your front wheel. A good fender keeps that water and dirt away from
    your chain as well. To prototype your idea you should try corrugated cardboard tied together with
    sliced innertube strips. This is cheap and recyclable. Make the final product out of coroplast and
    polycarbonate. Wind turbulence is only a problem at either high wind or bike speeds. The speed to
    avoid is over 35mph. If you go slow when you suspect a wind gust you may survive. Watch the weather
    forecast for windy days. I notice that trucks have a bow wave that pushes my vehicle out of its way
    first then there is turbulence behind the truck that will cause you to wreck if there is a stiff
    crosswind. You can make your vehicle more stable in a crosswind by placing a vertical stabilizing
    fin on the frame not forks in front of the front wheel and low. This will cause your bike to lean
    into crosswinds. When you test your thing on the road make sure you are wearing as much protective
    clothing as possible.
     
  20. On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 18:34:59 -0400, Richard Ney wrote:

    > Tim McNamara writes:
    >
    >> Put fenders on your bike, if it doesn't already have them. Buy a Carradice rain cape and shoe
    >> covers, and you're all set
    >
    > A rain cape!
    >
    > Now I've heard it all.

    Why do you say that? It's a very practical garment with a long history.
     
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