Keeping Dry Hints Please

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Jkeenan, Mar 27, 2003.

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  1. Jkeenan

    Jkeenan Guest

    Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first person who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a
    many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)

    Thank you for any and all suggestions

    Joe 'recumbo' Keenan
     
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  2. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    JKeenan wrote:
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides?

    What do you consider "super pricey"?

    I have Rainshield O2 rain pants:

    http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?Accessory=991838860

    I haven't worn them yet 'cuz I'm a fairweather cyclist.

    I also have a couple of Rainshield O2 jackets, which I wear as a cycling jacket even if it's not
    raining. It's very warm given its very light weight and does OK in breathability. They work very
    well in protecting against rain (at least a light rain--I haven't worn them in a downpour).

    A couple of cautions:

    - the Propore fabric (a variant of polypropylene) is very fragile to physical damage from abrasion
    as well as from heat (don't put it in the dryer)

    - the pants are cut *very* big. I ordered XXL figuring that I'd need an up size since I'd likely
    wear them over other long pants, and that cycling clothes tend to be cut for skinny folks. The XXL
    is huge! The fabric is very easy to sew though, so hemming and taking it in isn't a big deal.

    --
    I do not accept unsolicted commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for legitmate replies.
     
  3. "JKeenan" skrev...
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first person who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a
    > many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)

    Well, this is in the "one of these days"-category.

    But one of these days I will get me a cheap 100% waterproof set of rainclothes. Then cut out the
    back part of the pants, sleeves and back and replace with shoelaces or elastic band or velcro straps
    to keep the remaining fabric on me. Glue or tape the jacket and pants together to have a waterproof
    seal between em. This is for the more laidback eurobikes. The idea being that your front thats
    exposed to the elements will be 100% waterproof while the openings will let in air and keep you
    cool. All the openings will point towards the road and the straps will be put so theres a little
    flap that the water runs off instead of soaking your clothes.

    Dunno if it makes sense. :) Another annoying problem is water running into your sleeves at the
    openings at your wrists and gathering at the elbows.

    Mikael
     
  4. My "super pricey" ($37,5 on sale - ordinary price $62,5) lafuma airdry breathable pants seems to
    work pretty well. I don't ride much in rainy weather, though - but they let sweat out, stop the
    wind-chill, and seems to be water resistant.

    My suggestion is to find some pants with those specs (wind/water resistant - breathable) -
    preferably on sale ;-)

    HTH Torben

    "JKeenan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first
    person
    > who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)
    >
    > Thank you for any and all suggestions
    >
    > Joe 'recumbo' Keenan
     
  5. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first person who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a
    > many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)

    Simple answer. Don't bother. Any garment (no matter how breatheable) traps in as much heat and
    moisture as it keeps out if worn over the lower extremities. I wear a rain jacket which useually
    manages to need turned inside out to dry. I sometimes put plastic newspaper wrappers
    (disposable)over my shoes to keep water out since they take a long time to dry out.

    I can tolerate cold and I can tolerate wet. I can't seem to tolerate both cold and wet. If the temps
    get below 40F and the weather is rain, I generally will opt tp keep my chain dry.
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Dunno if it makes sense. :)

    It makes sense if :
    - you want to improve your geek-factor ;-)
    - you want to be as dry as possible

    > Another annoying problem is water running into your sleeves at the openings at your wrists and
    > gathering at the elbows.

    I need the elbow-valve too.

    Torben
     
  7. Joe Recumbo asked:

    > what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and bottom dry on rainy rides?

    A front fairing such as that pictured hereabouts -
    http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/misc/Kongcykel.htm - serves quite well *and* makes you go faster.
    Hurrah for SCIENCE!

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  8. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first
    person
    > who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)

    If it's only your lower body you are having problems keeping dry, then a front fairing or streamer
    may provide the protection you need (and a slight speed improvement in some situation). Of course
    the feasibility of this depends on which recumbent you ride.

    Mads
     
  9. "Mads Hilberg" skrev

    > If it's only your lower body you are having problems keeping dry, then a front fairing or streamer
    > may provide the protection you need (and a slight speed improvement in some situation). Of course
    > the feasibility of this depends on which recumbent you ride.

    The Streamer only kept me dry from the knees down alas. Still happy with it? Did you do the
    brevet yet?

    Mikael
     
  10. Well here's a post I can agree with. Due to my metabolism (or whatever), I sweat a lot when I ride.
    I have tried all sorts of "breathable" rain gear, and nothing works because no matter how cheap or
    expensive, how well vented the armpits are or not, I end up as wet inside as if I wasn't wearing it
    - and a lot smellier than if I just toughed it out. So I don't wear rain gear at all. My biggest
    problem is vision - trying to keep the glasses (have to wear them) from fogging or getting lots of
    drops on the lenses. I too will ride in pretty cool rainy weather. When I get off the bike, I
    immediately put on a sweatsuit or something to keep from cooling off and chilling.

    I have ridden RAGBRAI (Iowa) in pouring rain during July. It actually feels good to be cooled off by
    the rain. Try riding wet during a warm summer storm - its much nicer than sweating inside a suit!

    "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]
    > says...
    > > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs,
    > > and bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first
    person
    > > who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)
    >
    > Simple answer. Don't bother. Any garment (no matter how breatheable)
    traps in as much heat and
    > moisture as it keeps out if worn over the lower extremities. I wear a rain
    jacket which
    > useually manages to need turned inside out to dry. I sometimes put
    plastic newspaper wrappers
    > (disposable)over my shoes to keep water out since they take a long time to
    dry out.
    >
    > I can tolerate cold and I can tolerate wet. I can't seem to tolerate both
    cold and wet. If the
    > temps get below 40F and the weather is rain, I generally will opt tp keep
    my chain dry.
    > --
    >
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  11. Jay

    Jay Guest

    >JKeenan at [email protected] wrote: Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what
    >are some ways you folks keep your legs, and bottom dry on rainy rides? <snip>

    Despite the lengthy response- one thing that I have learned to do was to just ~~relax~~ about the
    possibility of getting wet- that attitude combined with good clothes have suited me fine.

    I have had only one miserable wet day. I was caught out in heavy rain just above the freezing point
    without proper clothing due to lack of planning. That day, with rivers of 1 Celcius water cascading
    against my skin, was one of the two miserable cycling days I have ever had. The other miserable day
    had hail slamming into my unprotected eyes. Hundreds of other rides were GREAT!

    Depends what you mean by "super pricey rain pants".

    MAKE THEM: Most of the styles of pants and fabric I am mentioning are available in fabric stores. If
    price is a serious issue- as it is for me a lot of the time- you (or designated sewer) can MAKE the
    pants you want.

    Polar fleece is $3-$20CDN/metre. Nylon fabric is $3-$15 CDN/metre. Nylon with rubber backing fabric
    is $10-$15 CDN/metre. Nylon with rubber backing breathable fabric is $15-$25 CDN/metre.

    Scrap bins (less than 1 1/2 metres) have fabrics at 50-75% off regular prices. I can make a
    form-fitting pair of pants for my elf-sized self with 3/4 of a metre (about $3CDN plus thread
    and elastic)

    USED CLOTHING: You can also look at second hand clothing stores. I find Gore-tex jackets easily for
    myself and other people (waiting lists) for $2-$8CDN. Gore-tex (or similar) pants are hard to find
    as used clothing. I found 100% nylon travel pants two days ago for $4CDN.

    Some stores have classified "Wanted" ads( eg Mountain Equipment Co-op)

    INVEST IN QUALITY: I have full zip(side pants) that are air-permiable, water proof that I paid about
    $80 CDN (less than half price). They have lasted through really rough treatment of year-round
    transportational cycling (heavy nasty winter) as well as camping and hiking for TEN years. They look
    like they will last at least another ten years (no sign of wear). (That makes for a daily guaranteed
    dry ride - at about one cent per ride- pretty cheap) Last week, I also picked up a black pair of
    air-permiable, water proof pants on sale at half price $40CDN. A local surplus store has
    air-permiable, water proof pants and jackets for between $25-$200(set)CDN.

    You can get cheap nylon pull-on pants for about $10CDN.

    I also wear shorts or pants that are quick dry so that if it is a light shower or if I get caught
    out that I will be comfortable. There are quick dry travel-style pants on the market that I like a
    lot. They are 100% nylon, comfortable and quick drying. Lots of pockets, flexible waist and great
    colours. Most of mine have zippers at the knees, so I have flexibility in my days ride and an easy
    launder and pack. I start the day in full pants and as the day warms- zip off to shorts. They are on
    sale at half price at sports/travel stores now.(about $30-$50CDN)

    I also use wick away long underwear and polar fleece pants (plus wind pants) in the winter.

    FEET TOO: Also consider wet feet (I can't feel comfortable). You can get wick away hiker liner socks
    and fleece socks.

    BIKE/TRIKE ADAPTIONS:

    I use fenders and panniers on my bikes and trikes to keep me drier.

    Mark Mueller created a clear plexiglass or lexan 'tray' for under his Greenspeed GTO trike. There
    may be pictures on his website.
     
  12. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > The Streamer only kept me dry from the knees down alas.

    When you stop, sure, it only helps as far as the knees, but when on the move I find it normally
    keeps me dry almost up to my waist. So with some normal cycling trousers and a waterproof jacket
    I've been reasonably comfortable.

    > Still happy with it?

    Sure, although I need to put some new velcro on it as it blew off in heavy winds! I think for me
    it's going to be mostly a winter accessory - the extra speed in headwinds doesn't really make up for
    the extra weight going up hills (in the UK that is, not in flat Denmark). But whenever I cycle
    without it and it's a little cold I always curse myself for not mounting it before I set off!

    > Did you do the brevet yet?

    My plans to do the first one in Norfolk fell through :-(

    How close to completion is your carbon bike?

    Mads
     
  13. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 14:40:52 GMT, "Pieter Litchfield" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[...] I have tried all sorts of "breathable" rain gear, and nothing works because no matter how
    >cheap or expensive, how well vented the armpits are or not, I end up as wet inside as if I wasn't
    >wearing it -

    The advice that most any rain gear will get wet from the inside under many conditions and
    exertion is sage.

    Most 'breathable waterproof' garmets work 'better' if there's a (large) temperature/humidity
    difference driving the warm moist air inside to the cooler drier outside. A DWR (durable water
    repelant) finish may help prevent the outer layer from being wetted and decreasing its ability to
    move moisture.

    There are some fabrics that do better at keeping you warm when wet. Synthetics, wools, etc... And
    there's a (fairly new) category of "Soft Shell" garmets that are not intended to be waterproof, but
    rather to resist wetting and keep you warm.

    E.g.: http://www.wildsnow.com/articles/serendipity_review_cloudveil/serendipity_jacket.html

    Another problem when riding in rain is grime. Fenders and fairing help, but rain riding is a
    combination of *wet*, *cold*, and *dirty* to one degree or another!

    Sometimes, a cheap waterproof shell will keep you cleaner, even if it makes you wetter...

    Jon Meinecke
     
  14. "Mads Hilberg" skrev

    > How close to completion is your carbon bike?

    Been riding it the last 2 weeks or so. Still in the fiddling stage ironing out the odd hiccup plus I
    have loads of work.

    Theres a pic on my photopage in the Velokraft- folder and yes the packing tape is just temporary.
    ;-) http://photos.yahoo.com/briangoebbels

    mvh Mikael
     
  15. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    Victor Kan wrote:
    > I have Rainshield O2 rain pants:
    >
    > http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?Accessory=991838860
    >
    > I haven't worn them yet 'cuz I'm a fairweather cyclist.
    ...
    > A couple of cautions:
    >
    > - the Propore fabric (a variant of polypropylene) is very fragile to physical damage from
    > abrasion as well as from heat (don't put it in the dryer)
    ...

    Well, I wore them today and guess what...I ripped a big hole in them when sitting my fat *rse
    down on my Trimuter and snagged the pants on the bar end shifter of the U-bars. Like I said,
    very fragile.

    It didn't rain today though--I wore them because after riding a few hundred feet from my house, I
    decided it was too cold/windy to wear just shorts, so I put them on.

    The thermometer said ~60 deg. F this morning, but it felt colder, especially in the shade. The pants
    worked great for keeping me warm, and I didn't feel damp or clammy on my lower extremeties at all.

    This ProPore stuff is great for emergency use. It's practically weightless and packs down small
    enough to put in a pannier already stuffed with other commuting essentials. But I wouldn't use the
    pants on a regular basis--they'd probably fall apart. But then it's pretty cheap in price.

    --
    I do not accept unsolicted commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for legitmate replies.
     
  16. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    JKeenan wrote:
    >
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first person who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a
    > many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)
    >
    > Thank you for any and all suggestions
    >
    > Joe 'recumbo' Keenan

    I am surprised that none of the three Danes posting on this thread have mentioned this alternative:
    < http://www.leitra.dk/ >.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  17. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    JKeenan wrote:
    >
    > Other than investing in super pricey rain pants, what are some ways you folks keep your legs, and
    > bottom dry on rainy rides? And the first person who replys with "Well....it Depends" will have a
    > many flat tire curse foisted upon them!! ;o)...

    I believe that "Depends" are used for a different type of wetness problem than rain.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  18. "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I am surprised that none of the three Danes posting on this thread have mentioned this
    > alternative: < http://www.leitra.dk/ >.

    Well, none of us is riding a Leitra, and I guess the "super pricey" part excluded this possibility
    anyway (yes, I know he was referring to the pants, but I maintain my position ;-). But yes, the
    Leitra must be a great all year round vehicle. Either a Leitra or the Allweder is on my wish list.

    Regards, Torben
     
  19. Tbradster

    Tbradster Guest

    I agree with Cletus on this one, above about 45 degrees, I don't worry about it, rain pants seem to
    make you just as wet.

    Below 45 degrees I wear some performance winter tights that have a windproof layer on the upper part
    which seems pretty waterproof.

    Fenders help a big bunch, though. If you do much riding in wet weather, you need fenders unless to
    enjoy cleaning your bike up a lot.

    Brad
     
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