Keeping warm and dry in the cold and wet



J

John_Kane

Guest
Cheryl wrote:
> On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 17:04:04 -0000, "Clive George"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
> >
> >I'll happily go shopping in full lycra

>
> Quote of the year and it's only the 4th of Jan. :)


What's wrong with shopping in full lycra? One of the owners of my
local pub actually didn't recognize me for a moment because I was not
in full lycra!
John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
J

John_Kane

Guest
---clip---
> I must also admit that I found walking on pavements beside busy roads on
> which I normally cycle made me feel very exposed and uncomfortable -- I
> feel much safer on the road on my velo.


I am glad to hear I am not the only one ! I was walking down a fairly
busy 4 lane street a while ago and I was extremely nervous. I've
ridden the same street for years without a qualm.

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
J

John_Kane

Guest
Peter B wrote:
> "Fay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:11364[email protected]
> > I'm more traditional than that. Like my grandmother I live in a
> > traditional old house which is ventilated by draughts. The temperature
> > rarely exceeds 19C in a warm room unless I've invited some centrally
> > heated friends round for dinner :)

>
> Stop it! You're making me feel cold ;-)
> --
> Pete
> http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/Stuff


This reminds me of some advice I heard a man say that he had given his
daughter as she left Canada for year at a British university. He said,
" And remember dear, there is usually no difference in the temperture
in the house or outside in the UK."

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, POHB
('[email protected]') wrote:

> Let's hear it for the Altura Nevis!
> Mine has done me fine for 2 years of daily commuting.
> Mind you, it isn't as hi-viz as it used to be.


And another vote. Excellent piece of kit. Mine must be at least two years
old.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

I shall continue to be an impossible person so long as those
who are now possible remain possible -- Michael Bakunin
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, James
Annan ('[email protected]') wrote:

> Clive George wrote:
>
>> Winter
>> cycling tights - ones with a slightly fleecy feel - are jolly good in
>> both cold and wet. Then a skirt over the top takes care of the looks.

>
> I''ll take your word for it!


Believe me, Becky of this parish can make that combination look very easy
on the eye.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; 99% of browsers can't run ActiveX controls. Unfortunately
;; 99% of users are using the 1% of browsers that can...
[seen on /. 08:04:02]
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
John_Kane ('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> Peter B wrote:
>> "Fay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> > I'm more traditional than that. Like my grandmother I live in a
>> > traditional old house which is ventilated by draughts. The
>> > temperature rarely exceeds 19C in a warm room unless I've invited
>> > some centrally heated friends round for dinner :)

>>
>> Stop it! You're making me feel cold ;-)

>
> This reminds me of some advice I heard a man say that he had given his
> daughter as she left Canada for year at a British university. He said,
> " And remember dear, there is usually no difference in the temperture
> in the house or outside in the UK."


Should there be?

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
;; Sending your money to someone just because they've erected
;; a barrier of obscurity and secrets around the tools you
;; need to use your data does not help the economy or spur
;; innovation. - Waffle Iron Slashdot, June 16th, 2002
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
John_Kane ('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> Cheryl wrote:
>> On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 17:04:04 -0000, "Clive George"
>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> >I'll happily go shopping in full lycra

>>
>> Quote of the year and it's only the 4th of Jan. :)

>
> What's wrong with shopping in full lycra?


Nothing. Practical and comfortable.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

I'm fed up with Life 1.0. I never liked it much and now it's getting
me down. I think I'll upgrade to MSLife 97 -- you know, the one that
comes in a flash new box and within weeks you're crawling with bugs.
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:
> in message <[email protected]>, James
> Annan ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
> > Clive George wrote:
> >
> >> Winter
> >> cycling tights - ones with a slightly fleecy feel - are jolly good in
> >> both cold and wet. Then a skirt over the top takes care of the looks.

> >
> > I''ll take your word for it!

>
> Believe me, Becky of this parish can make that combination look very easy
> on the eye.


Not sure it would look so good on Clive though..

...d
 
L

LSMike

Guest
wafflycat wrote:
> I do go shopping in full Lycra....
>
> Cheers, helen s


But not bibs***ts. IIRC the PSF is happy with biblongs though.
Marvellous invention for the winter.
 
L

LSMike

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:
>
> H'mmm... yes... I remember when I was a research fellow working in a lab
> with a lot of kit and no air conditioning. It used to get a little warm.
> One summers e was a knock on the door, and in walked the professor of
> computing, the vice chancellor, and the minister for information
> technology. I _was_ wearing a pair of boxer shorts, honest...
>
> But nothing else.
>
> --
> [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/


ROTFL! Or is it now cloff?
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"John_Kane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> This reminds me of some advice I heard a man say that he had given his
> daughter as she left Canada for year at a British university. He said,
> " And remember dear, there is usually no difference in the temperture
> in the house or outside in the UK."


Was true. In 1977 we made an Xmas trip back to the UK from Winnipeg and
stayed with in-laws. The temps in Winnipeg at Xmas were -15c to -30c (colder
still later in Jan) while those in England >5c (guessing, a long time ago)
but we were perished during most of our stay and glad to get back to
Winnipeg, at least the interiors were warm! Outside a different matter
though!
It was the norm to have motor racing on the frozen river in town and
northern communities otherwise lacking roads had truck deliveries over roads
built on frozen lakes.
BTW, we had a stay in Kingston, visited Fort Henry and did the Thousand
Island boat trip.
--
Pete
http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/Stuff
 
W

wafflycat

Guest
"LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> wafflycat wrote:
>> I do go shopping in full Lycra....
>>
>> Cheers, helen s

>
> But not bibs***ts. IIRC the PSF is happy with biblongs though.
> Marvellous invention for the winter.
>


Oh no... b*b anything is to be avoided.

Cheers, helen s
 
L

LSMike

Guest
wafflycat wrote:
> "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > wafflycat wrote:
> >> I do go shopping in full Lycra....
> >>
> >> Cheers, helen s

> >
> > But not bibs***ts. IIRC the PSF is happy with biblongs though.
> > Marvellous invention for the winter.
> >

>
> Oh no... b*b anything is to be avoided.
>
> Cheers, helen s


I'm sure I recall a comment from the PSF that biblongs for the cold
were quite acceptable?
 
J

James Annan

Guest
Peter B wrote:

> "Fay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>I'm more traditional than that. Like my grandmother I live in a
>>traditional old house which is ventilated by draughts. The temperature
>>rarely exceeds 19C in a warm room unless I've invited some centrally
>>heated friends round for dinner :)

>
>
> Stop it! You're making me feel cold ;-)


Our heating, in the one room that we bother to heat, is generally set to
17 or 18C. Most of the house is about 6C. It's often clearly warmer when
we go outside.

James
--
James Annan
see web pages for email
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
http://julesandjames.blogspot.com/
 
J

James Annan

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:

> in message <[email protected]>, James
> Annan ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>
>>Clive George wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Winter
>>>cycling tights - ones with a slightly fleecy feel - are jolly good in
>>>both cold and wet. Then a skirt over the top takes care of the looks.

>>
>>I''ll take your word for it!

>
>
> Believe me, Becky of this parish can make that combination look very easy
> on the eye.
>


I'm sure she can - but _Clive_?

James
--
James Annan
see web pages for email
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
http://julesandjames.blogspot.com/
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
LSMike ('[email protected]') wrote:

> wafflycat wrote:
>> "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> >
>> > wafflycat wrote:
>> >> I do go shopping in full Lycra....
>> >
>> > But not bibs***ts. IIRC the PSF is happy with biblongs though.
>> > Marvellous invention for the winter.

>>
>> Oh no... b*b anything is to be avoided.

>
> I'm sure I recall a comment from the PSF that biblongs for the cold
> were quite acceptable?


Oh no. The PSF finds the supporting of /any/ of the pendulous parts of
ones' anatomy by means of shoulder straps quite, errmmm, unsupportable.
She burned all her bras years ago.

Hypocrisy? Of course not.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

---===***<<< This space to let! >>>***===---
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A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <[email protected]>,
> John_Kane ('[email protected]') wrote:
>> Peter B wrote:
>>> "Fay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]
>>> > I'm more traditional than that. Like my grandmother I live in a
>>> > traditional old house which is ventilated by draughts. The
>>> > temperature rarely exceeds 19C in a warm room unless I've invited
>>> > some centrally heated friends round for dinner :)
>>>
>>> Stop it! You're making me feel cold ;-)

>>
>> This reminds me of some advice I heard a man say that he had given his
>> daughter as she left Canada for year at a British university. He said,
>> " And remember dear, there is usually no difference in the temperture
>> in the house or outside in the UK."

>
> Should there be?



To some extent. I'd say that (my own, at least) health begins to suffer if I
try to spend much of my time in places that are not above, say, 15 Celsius,
unless I'm living a pretty active life (i.e. I'd need a manual job as well
as doing a fair quota of riding.)

That's what I found in my 4 Edinburgh winters without central heating,
anyway.
--
Ambrose
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
"John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]
> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 11:24:47 +0000, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>> That said, despite the fact that I benefit from 4kW of heating all to
>> myself, I'm normally working in an ambient temperature of about 10
>> celsius.

> Get round the back, and start running something CPU intensive. Toasty warm
> then. And wear those ear plugs. I SAID WEAR THOSE EAR PLUGS.


Much as I'd love to be a full time techy, due to recent health problems, and
all kinds of other ****, the information repository that I work in produces
no heat, and stores the information mainly by a highly redundant (c.
100kilobits/character) 2d matrix of carbon on cellulose. To compact the
storage, these matrices are parallelised and layered in sets of around 150,
cut to a size of 150mm x 200mm, glued along one edge and encapsulated in
thicker cellulose layers, which are normally covered in pigments which
encode visual representations.

People pay us about 10 pounds for each of these 1 megacharacter
repositories, which cannot be easily copied in an equivalently convenient or
comfortable format for ocular conversion to semantic representation, and
must be produced in systems as many as a billion times larger than a common
or garden optical or magnetic drive, but apparently there's enough people
who like their information in this format to make it worth it.

(All figures may vary by up to 2 orders of magnitude, except the
dimensionality of the matrices)

Anyway, this storage format produces no heat in use, and even my manually
acting as a conduit for it, with the help of Royal Mail and Parcelforce,
produces insufficient heat. I have yet to enquire about means of obtaining
heat from the stored information, but I understand it's not generally
condoned, and considered 'Stalinist'.

So, no, no servers in the cold bit of work. And no dedicated servers in the
office, either.
--
Ambrose
 
F

Fay

Guest
Chris Malcolm wrote:
> Tosspot <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Fay wrote:
> > <snip>

>
> >> I don't want to buy special cycling clothes. I want to buy some clothes
> >> which will pass equally well as ordinary walking about and shopping
> >> clothes.

>
> > <snip>

>
> > Buffalo jackets used to work well. Theres probably more modern, better
> > stuff about these days. http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/dpthumbs.htm

>
> For winter cycling of distances greater than about 4 miles (my office
> commuting distance) I wear a Buffalo shirt over a Helly Hansen
> half-merino half-polyester wicking T-shirt.


If I've got the prices right that's more than 100 quid! A bit too
expensive for stuff I'd only wear on a bike.

> I've been so impressed by the utility of this sweat-permeable
> non-waterproof idea, that I've taken an old woolly windcheater I've
> had for years, and treated it with showerproofing which makes rain
> bead and bounce off. Without that it simply soaked up rain like a
> sponge. With this showerproofing it has become transformed into a
> useful non-sweaty cycling to work and walking about garment which
> takes rain of less than than half an hour's duration in its stride.


That sounds a good idea! I've got several nice wooly winter coats and
jackets whose main problem is they get badly soaked in rain. And if I
put a light waterproof something over them sweat condenses inside it. A
long time ago I tried a waterproof spray can on one, but it was
expensive. not very good, and quickly wore off.

Can you recommend a good waterproof treatment?

Fay