Keeping warm and dry in the cold and wet



S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
('[email protected]') wrote:

> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:p[email protected]
>> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 11:24:47 +0000, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>>> That said, despite the fact that I benefit from 4kW of heating all to
>>> myself, I'm normally working in an ambient temperature of about 10
>>> celsius.

>> Get round the back, and start running something CPU intensive. Toasty
>> warm then. And wear those ear plugs. I SAID WEAR THOSE EAR PLUGS.

>
> Much as I'd love to be a full time techy, due to recent health
> problems, and all kinds of other ****, the information repository that
> I work in produces no heat, and stores the information mainly by a
> highly redundant (c. 100kilobits/character) 2d matrix of carbon on
> cellulose.


[snip: wonderful stuff]

Love it. Could I grab this 'whole cloth' as it were (with attributions of
course) for use in an essay or lecture some time?

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; may contain traces of nuts, bolts or washers.
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:p[email protected]
>>> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 11:24:47 +0000, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>>>> That said, despite the fact that I benefit from 4kW of heating all to
>>>> myself, I'm normally working in an ambient temperature of about 10
>>>> celsius.
>>> Get round the back, and start running something CPU intensive. Toasty
>>> warm then. And wear those ear plugs. I SAID WEAR THOSE EAR PLUGS.

>>
>> Much as I'd love to be a full time techy, due to recent health
>> problems, and all kinds of other ****, the information repository that
>> I work in produces no heat, and stores the information mainly by a
>> highly redundant (c. 100kilobits/character) 2d matrix of carbon on
>> cellulose.

>
> [snip: wonderful stuff]
>
> Love it. Could I grab this 'whole cloth' as it were (with attributions of
> course) for use in an essay or lecture some time?



But of course. It seemed worth writing to me, but I was worried it would
just come out tedious. Glad you liked it.

--
Ambrose
 
J

John_Kane

Guest
Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > in message <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
> > ('[email protected]') wrote:
> >
> >> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >> news:p[email protected]
> >>> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 11:24:47 +0000, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
> >>>> That said, despite the fact that I benefit from 4kW of heating all to
> >>>> myself, I'm normally working in an ambient temperature of about 10
> >>>> celsius.
> >>> Get round the back, and start running something CPU intensive. Toasty
> >>> warm then. And wear those ear plugs. I SAID WEAR THOSE EAR PLUGS.
> >>
> >> Much as I'd love to be a full time techy, due to recent health
> >> problems, and all kinds of other ****, the information repository that
> >> I work in produces no heat, and stores the information mainly by a
> >> highly redundant (c. 100kilobits/character) 2d matrix of carbon on
> >> cellulose.

> >
> > [snip: wonderful stuff]
> >
> > Love it. Could I grab this 'whole cloth' as it were (with attributions of
> > course) for use in an essay or lecture some time?

>
>
> But of course. It seemed worth writing to me, but I was worried it would
> just come out tedious. Glad you liked it.
>
> --
> Ambrose


I would like to sent it to a couple of librarians I know if you don't
mind. It's a lovely piece of work.

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
John_Kane wrote:
> Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]..
>>> in message <[email protected]>, Ambrose Nankivell
>>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>>>
>>>> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>> news:p[email protected]
>>>>> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 11:24:47 +0000, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:
>>>>>> That said, despite the fact that I benefit from 4kW of heating
>>>>>> all to myself, I'm normally working in an ambient temperature of
>>>>>> about 10 celsius.
>>>>> Get round the back, and start running something CPU intensive.
>>>>> Toasty warm then. And wear those ear plugs. I SAID WEAR THOSE EAR
>>>>> PLUGS.
>>>>
>>>> Much as I'd love to be a full time techy, due to recent health
>>>> problems, and all kinds of other ****, the information repository
>>>> that I work in produces no heat, and stores the information mainly
>>>> by a highly redundant (c. 100kilobits/character) 2d matrix of
>>>> carbon on cellulose.
>>>
>>> [snip: wonderful stuff]
>>>
>>> Love it. Could I grab this 'whole cloth' as it were (with
>>> attributions of course) for use in an essay or lecture some time?

>>
>>
>> But of course. It seemed worth writing to me, but I was worried it
>> would just come out tedious. Glad you liked it.

>
> I would like to sent it to a couple of librarians I know if you don't
> mind. It's a lovely piece of work.


Of course.
--
Ambrose
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
Fay <[email protected]> wrote:

> Chris Malcolm wrote:


>> I've been so impressed by the utility of this sweat-permeable
>> non-waterproof idea, that I've taken an old woolly windcheater I've
>> had for years, and treated it with showerproofing which makes rain
>> bead and bounce off. Without that it simply soaked up rain like a
>> sponge. With this showerproofing it has become transformed into a
>> useful non-sweaty cycling to work and walking about garment which
>> takes rain of less than than half an hour's duration in its stride.


> That sounds a good idea! I've got several nice wooly winter coats and
> jackets whose main problem is they get badly soaked in rain. And if I
> put a light waterproof something over them sweat condenses inside it. A
> long time ago I tried a waterproof spray can on one, but it was
> expensive. not very good, and quickly wore off.


> Can you recommend a good waterproof treatment?


The only treatment I've tried is Nikwax Polar Proof, which you wash
in. They want you to wash the thing first in their special detergent,
which I did. When fresh it was startlingly water repellent, which wore
off quite quickly, and it settled down to being usefully water
resistant for the rest of the year.

It certainly hasn't made the jacket waterproof, but it's considerably
lengthened the time it takes for it to get sopping wet all the way
through, which it used to do very quickly indeed in heavy rain.

It's not as good as the finish on some newly bought showerproofed
garments, but it's good enough to be useful, and I'll keep using it,
unless someone suggests something better to me.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]