KFC question.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Pandora, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    dough there are also cornflakes.
    Is it true? What do you think?
    Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of chicken
    seam to have cornflakes over!
    Cheers
    Pandora
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 10:20:13 +0100, "Pandora" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    >dough there are also cornflakes.
    >Is it true? What do you think?
    >Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of chicken
    >seam to have cornflakes over!


    KFC comes in (at least) two varieties: Original Recipe (cooked in the
    pressure fryers) and Extra Crispy--that kind does rather look like it
    has cornflake breading (and for all I know, it does). I don't think
    the Extra Crispy is cooked the same way as Original Recipe--and I
    don't think much of it at all, actually.


    --
    -denny-
    "Do your thoughts call ahead or do they just arrive at your mouth unannounced?"

    "It's come as you are, baby."

    -over the hedge
     
  3. Nancy Young wrote:

    > Interesting, I hadn't thought of the extra crispy; when people are
    > looking for kentucky fried chicken, I assume the original. As far
    > as I'm concerned, extra crispy is just extra breading, but to each
    > their own.



    Burger King has these "chicken fries" thingies, they are bits of meat that
    have a lot of extra coating - and a choice of SIX dipping sauces! :

    http://www.villagevoice.com/nyclife/0605,lalli,71950,15.html

    For the Birds
    Burger King demolishes chicken as we know it

    by Nina Lalli
    January 27th, 2006 6:43 PM

    "Chicken will never be the same."

    This suspicious declaration is the concluding line of Burger King's
    promotion for its sickest creation since the Enormous Omelet Sandwich:
    Chicken Fries.

    Chicken has really been through the ringer in this country over the past few
    decades. The birds themselves have been bred for maximum dryness and
    ultimate blandness-that is, bloated white meat. And, as we all know,
    society's weird beauty standards are never reached easily. The hormones used
    to achieve the desired white-to-dark meat proportions have been blamed for a
    slew of unhealthy side effects, including lowering the age girls begin
    puberty. Poor chicken. It never asked for breast enhancements.

    But worse than the fact that thighs have been underappreciated is the
    twisted fact that breasts, which only became popular because they're lean,
    are so boring to eat that they have been manipulated by scientists through a
    series of increasingly fatty food inventions. Enter the chicken fry.

    In a way, Burger King's simplicity is refreshing. Others have bent over
    backwards to win the prize for originality-Ruby Tuesday's Crispy Buffalo
    Wontons have garnered a ridiculous amount of attention, for example. But BK
    just modified the chicken tender or nugget to be less chicken and more fry.
    The meat, so bragged-about by fast food purveyors for its purity (is "whole
    white chicken breast meat'' really that impressive?) is now just a steamy
    sliver encased in a thick cocoon of heavily flavored batter. The flesh
    itself is a mere casualty, its lack of taste obscenely overcompensated for
    by a ton of salt. A small order (six pieces for $2.05) contains 15 grams of
    fat; the nine-piece version has 23. Granted, that's nothing compared with
    the 47 gram omelet sandwich, but it's a pretty hefty snack.

    I visited a few Burger Kings around town to experience the end of chicken as
    we know it. I cannot think of a more appropriate place for mourning any food
    than the BK on Sixth Avenue between 34th and 35th streets. (Oh,
    wait-actually, the one under 50th street on Fifth Avenue-in the subway
    station-maybe wins the prize.) BK 50th Street was almost empty when I got
    there in the early evening, save for a few homeless people, a table of
    scared-looking tourists, and some very troubling teenaged girls.

    To be sure that taste buds are sufficiently assaulted, the fries come with
    your choice of six dipping sauces. Six! Finding this choice a bit
    overwhelming, I pretended I was at a restaurant and asked the woman behind
    the counter whether she had a favorite. From the look she gave me, I
    realized that I had clearly just outed myself as a nonfunctioning adult. It
    wasn't scorn, but straight pity. "You can try them all if you want to," she
    told me in a preschool teacher voice.

    I didn't really want to, but I did try them all. Along with the traditional
    sweet 'n' sour, honey mustard, and barbeque (updated to Spicy Honey Barbeque
    sauce, which an employee explained to a customer: "tastes better than
    barbeque") there are three newcomers. Two of them, ranch and buffalo sauce,
    are predictable. But the showstopper is something called "ZESTY Onion Ring
    Sauce." What's onion ring sauce? Well, kids, it's soybean oil, water,
    horseradish, vinegar, more water, a lot of salt, more soybean oil, some
    artificial flavors, thickeners, lemon juice, sugar, and more. The end result
    makes me crave horseradish mayonnaise.

    As I sat slumped in my plastic BK chair, I felt depressed: chicken's demise
    seems to reflect a schism in the way Americans eat. While tortured breasts
    appear in all kinds of elaborate disguises in fast food restaurants, a
    strong market has emerged for poultry distinguished as organic,
    naturally-raised, hormone-free, grain-fed, free-range, etc.

    So, dear consumers, you've got a choice. You can eat real chicken, such as a
    natural, hormone-free breast from Murray's (at supermarkets for around
    $4-5/pound-thighs are even less). Or you can follow the path to chicken
    devolution, which leads underground to 50th Street, where you'll find a
    stick of fatty, salty something dripping with ZESTY sauce."
     
  4. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Gregory Morrow"
    <[email protected]> wrote

    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >> Interesting, I hadn't thought of the extra crispy; when people are
    >> looking for kentucky fried chicken, I assume the original. As far
    >> as I'm concerned, extra crispy is just extra breading, but to each
    >> their own.


    > Burger King has these "chicken fries" thingies, they are bits of meat that
    > have a lot of extra coating - and a choice of SIX dipping sauces! :


    Heh, funny article. Do people still think those nuggets are a
    healthful alternative to burgers, I wonder? You also clarified
    for me, my long ago memory of extra crispy chicken was not
    only that it was all breading, but that when you got through the
    breading, you found a very small piece of chicken inside. As
    though they sorted chicken by size when they determine regular
    or extra crispy.

    Wrong, no doubt, just my impression.

    nancy
     
  5. Pandora wrote:
    > Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    > dough there are also cornflakes.
    > Is it true? What do you think?
    > Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of chicken
    > seam to have cornflakes over!


    No corn flakes. KFC does chicken with two different coatings; what they
    call "original" and " extra-crispy." They are only seasoned flour.

    Original-style has a thin coating. Extra crispy has a thicker coating
    that forms shapes, when fried, that look like corn flakes have been
    added to the coating.

    No corn flakes in the chicken coating.

    Pastorio
     
  6. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >Original-style has a thin coating. Extra crispy has a thicker coating
    >that forms shapes, when fried, that look like corn flakes have been
    >added to the coating.
    >No corn flakes in the chicken coating.
    >Pastorio


    And never use Cornflakes as a coating on chicken... there's no getting
    around the flavor of cereal on your chicken.

    I know that some people do a skinless oven "fried" chicken and use
    cornflakes but a tastier "less corny" option is crumbled Melba Toast.
    Buy the flavored toasts and you can even by-pass some of the seasoning.
    It's very good. Kev
     
  7. Clay Irving

    Clay Irving Guest

    On 2006-01-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    > dough there are also cornflakes.
    > Is it true? What do you think?
    > Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of chicken
    > seam to have cornflakes over!


    This is my favorite KFC dish:

    http://www.panix.com/~clay/thailand/PICT0026.jpg

    In Thailand, KFC sells what I like to call "Yam KFC". A "yam" is a salad,
    literally tossed, mixed together. So KFC in Thailand (which is very popular
    with the Thais) mixes chicken strips with lime juice, fish sauce, chili,
    onions, and cilantro and serves it with steamed rice and fresh tomato and
    cucumber. It is very tasty!

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    #11906 Look at the error message! Look at the error message!
    - Good Advice and Maxims for Programmers, Mark Jason Dominus <[email protected]>
     
  8. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > Pandora wrote:
    >> Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    >> dough there are also cornflakes.
    >> Is it true? What do you think?
    >> Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of
    >> chicken seam to have cornflakes over!

    >
    > No corn flakes. KFC does chicken with two different coatings; what they
    > call "original" and " extra-crispy." They are only seasoned flour.
    >
    > Original-style has a thin coating. Extra crispy has a thicker coating that
    > forms shapes, when fried, that look like corn flakes have been added to
    > the coating.
    >
    > No corn flakes in the chicken coating.


    Thank you Bob. If you find a recipe for extra -crispy tell me, please.
    Cheers
    Pandora
    >
    > Pastorio
     
  9. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "kevnbro" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > >Original-style has a thin coating. Extra crispy has a thicker coating
    >>that forms shapes, when fried, that look like corn flakes have been
    >>added to the coating.
    >>No corn flakes in the chicken coating.
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > And never use Cornflakes as a coating on chicken... there's no getting
    > around the flavor of cereal on your chicken.
    >
    > I know that some people do a skinless oven "fried" chicken and use
    > cornflakes but a tastier "less corny" option is crumbled Melba Toast.
    > Buy the flavored toasts and you can even by-pass some of the seasoning.
    > It's very good. Kev


    Mhhhh! I must try! Thank you!
    Pandora
    >
     
  10. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2006-01-30, Pandora <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the KFC
    >> dough there are also cornflakes.
    >> Is it true? What do you think?
    >> Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of
    >> chicken
    >> seam to have cornflakes over!

    >
    > This is my favorite KFC dish:
    >
    > http://www.panix.com/~clay/thailand/PICT0026.jpg
    >
    > In Thailand, KFC sells what I like to call "Yam KFC". A "yam" is a salad,
    > literally tossed, mixed together. So KFC in Thailand (which is very
    > popular
    > with the Thais) mixes chicken strips with lime juice, fish sauce, chili,
    > onions, and cilantro and serves it with steamed rice and fresh tomato and
    > cucumber. It is very tasty!


    And it looks very nice!!!! Good!
    Pandora
    >
    > --
    > Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    > #11906 Look at the error message! Look at the error message!
    > - Good Advice and Maxims for Programmers, Mark Jason Dominus
    > <[email protected]>
     
  11. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >In Thailand, KFC sells what I like to call "Yam KFC". A "yam" is a salad,
    >literally tossed, mixed together. So KFC in Thailand (which is very popular
    >with the Thais) mixes chicken strips with lime juice, fish sauce, chili,
    >onions, and cilantro and serves it with steamed rice and fresh tomato and
    >cucumber. It is very tasty!


    Now that's about as far from American "KFC" as one can get.
    They should call it, "TLC" (No! Not that TLC....Thai Lime Chicken)
    Kev
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > As I sat slumped in my plastic BK chair, I felt depressed: chicken's demise
    > seems to reflect a schism in the way Americans eat. While tortured breasts
    > appear in all kinds of elaborate disguises in fast food restaurants,
    >


    Thanks for sharing that ;-) -- just glad I wasn't slurping a cup of coffee when
    I read this post. B.t.w. there seems to be a typo here, shouldn't it read 'fat
    food restaurants'? (just going on what was said before)

    -P.

    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
  13. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2006-01-30, Gregory Morrow <[email protected]> wrote:

    > But BK
    > just modified the chicken tender or nugget to be less chicken and more fry.


    > sliver encased in a thick cocoon of heavily flavored batter. The flesh



    At least there's a sliver. It would be impossible for BK to make
    their chicken fries "less" than a McD's chicken nugget. For the first
    couple decades of the Chicken McNugget, there was no chicken meat
    whatsoever. Seriously. I looked. My daughter loved them and we'd
    occasionally buy them for her. One day I was bored and started
    wondering about them. I disected half an order. No meat. They were
    just some sort of breaded and fried fat absorbing sponge matrix
    thingie. It wasn't until just a few years ago McD's started putting
    real chicken meat in their nuggets.

    This all-breading and little meat is not new. I remember the old
    Sizzler all-you-can-eat promos. I once ...only once... bought into
    their all-you-can-eat shrimp-a-thon. They brought out small plate
    of popcorn shrimp that were 33% shrimp and 67% breading. I was
    pissed. I started in earnest relieving these micro shrimp of their
    grease/bread casing and piling the shrimp up on another plate till I
    went through them all. Then I ordered more and ate the now naked
    shrimp. After a half a dozen or so plates and a couple pissed
    server-droids, I figure I'd had enough. I felt no satisfaction,
    though. The shrimp still sucked.

    Sizzler was the master of these trick eat-till-you-puke gimmicks. They
    did another with all-you-can-eat ribs. We tried it ...again, once!
    They were tough old beef ribs that had a sauce so repugnant, I
    couldn't eat even one. I no longer frequent these types of
    restaurants (chains), but I'm sure places like Olive Garden and Red
    Lobster still pull the same crap with their never ending gluttony
    promos. Hey, twenty-nine cents worth of wet noodles for only $9.99!
    Bleh.

    nb
     
  14. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2006-01-30, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:

    > cornflakes but a tastier "less corny" option is crumbled Melba Toast.


    Another option for more texture are Japanese style "panko" bread
    (rice?) crumbs.

    nb
     
  15. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >>> Interesting, I hadn't thought of the extra crispy; when people are
    >>> looking for kentucky fried chicken, I assume the original. As far
    >>> as I'm concerned, extra crispy is just extra breading, but to each
    >>> their own.

    >
    >> Burger King has these "chicken fries" thingies, they are bits of
    >> meat that have a lot of extra coating - and a choice of SIX dipping
    >> sauces! :

    >
    > Heh, funny article. Do people still think those nuggets are a
    > healthful alternative to burgers, I wonder? You also clarified
    > for me, my long ago memory of extra crispy chicken was not
    > only that it was all breading, but that when you got through the
    > breading, you found a very small piece of chicken inside. As
    > though they sorted chicken by size when they determine regular
    > or extra crispy.
    >
    > Wrong, no doubt, just my impression.
    >
    > nancy


    I'm nuts, I guess. I really prefer the crispy (I mean CRISPY!) breading to
    the bit of chicken inside :) However, I'm blessed at having that little
    store down the street where some real old-style country cooks know how to
    cook fried chicken. Crispy outside, juicy inside, I don't mind eating the
    chicken! Don't do it very often but at least I've seen Yvonne back there
    hand-coating chicken pieces in flour just before lunch time. I know they
    don't buy frozen "fried chicken" from a restaurant supplier and pretend it's
    the real deal. It IS. And dang if it doesn't taste great!

    Thanks for setting off a craving for some real fried chicken and quarter
    fries :)

    Jill
     
  16. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Pandora wrote:
    > Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the
    > KFC dough there are also cornflakes.
    > Is it true? What do you think?
    > Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of
    > chicken seam to have cornflakes over!
    > Cheers
    > Pandora


    I don't know about KFC and the cornflakes but I used to make a very good
    "oven fried" chicken which is seasoned and then coated with crushed
    cornflake crumbs. It turns out as if it had been fried but is not.

    Off the top of my head: the pieces of chicken (usually chicken breasts and
    thighs, on the bone) were dipped in an egg wash. Then rolled in cornflake
    crumbs seasoned with garlic powder, salt & pepper to taste, maybe some dried
    marjoram. Coat the chicken well and let sit so the coating dries and
    adheres to the chicken well.

    To a baking dish of adequate size for the chicken pieces, add a little
    cooking oil, about 3-4 Tablespoonfuls (not olive oil, too strong! canola or
    corn oil). Heat it up in a hot oven (about 400F degrees). Quickly arrange
    the chicken in the dish with the hot oil. Bake at a very high temperature;
    if I remember correctly (and I may not) it was 400F or maybe 425F for about
    20 minutes. No need to cover or turn the chicken; it turned out crispy.
    And very tasty!

    Jill
     
  17. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    kevnbro wrote:
    >> Original-style has a thin coating. Extra crispy has a thicker coating
    >> that forms shapes, when fried, that look like corn flakes have been
    >> added to the coating.
    >> No corn flakes in the chicken coating.
    >> Pastorio

    >
    > And never use Cornflakes as a coating on chicken... there's no
    > getting around the flavor of cereal on your chicken.
    >

    I don't agree with that. Cornflakes don't have all that much flavour.

    > I know that some people do a skinless oven "fried" chicken and use
    > cornflakes but a tastier "less corny" option is crumbled Melba Toast.


    Now see? Melba Toast, even plain, has a stronger taste to me than does
    cornflake crumbs :) So we can agree to disagree. However, I do love melba
    toast rounds for snacking on!

    Jill
     
  18. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > Pandora wrote:
    >> Some italian people who have tasted KFC abroad, told me that in the
    >> KFC dough there are also cornflakes.
    >> Is it true? What do you think?
    >> Searching with Google, I have seen a photo on the web and pieces of
    >> chicken seam to have cornflakes over!
    >> Cheers
    >> Pandora

    >
    > I don't know about KFC and the cornflakes but I used to make a very good
    > "oven fried" chicken which is seasoned and then coated with crushed
    > cornflake crumbs. It turns out as if it had been fried but is not.


    This is a great new!
    >
    > Off the top of my head: the pieces of chicken (usually chicken breasts and
    > thighs, on the bone) were dipped in an egg wash. Then rolled in cornflake
    > crumbs seasoned with garlic powder, salt & pepper to taste, maybe some
    > dried
    > marjoram. Coat the chicken well and let sit so the coating dries and
    > adheres to the chicken well.


    Do you break cornflakes, or do you use them whole?
    Another thing. Why don't you put spices inside eggs, rather then in
    cornflakes breadcrumb?

    >
    > To a baking dish of adequate size for the chicken pieces, add a little
    > cooking oil, about 3-4 Tablespoonfuls (not olive oil, too strong! canola
    > or
    > corn oil). Heat it up in a hot oven (about 400F degrees). Quickly
    > arrange
    > the chicken in the dish with the hot oil. Bake at a very high
    > temperature;
    > if I remember correctly (and I may not) it was 400F or maybe 425F for
    > about
    > 20 minutes. No need to cover or turn the chicken; it turned out crispy.
    > And very tasty!


    Gnam gnam! I like this recipe! I will eat KFC till summer because I must try
    almost all :)))
    Cheers and thank you
    Pandora
    (hoping your father stay better then the last time I have heard of him)
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
     
  19. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Pandora wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Pandora wrote:
    >> I don't know about KFC and the cornflakes but I used to make a very
    >> good "oven fried" chicken which is seasoned and then coated with
    >> crushed cornflake crumbs. It turns out as if it had been fried but
    >> is not.

    >
    > This is a great new!
    >>
    >> Off the top of my head: the pieces of chicken (usually chicken
    >> breasts and thighs, on the bone) were dipped in an egg wash. Then
    >> rolled in cornflake crumbs seasoned with garlic powder, salt &
    >> pepper to taste, maybe some dried
    >> marjoram. Coat the chicken well and let sit so the coating dries and
    >> adheres to the chicken well.

    >
    > Do you break cornflakes, or do you use them whole?


    In the U.S. they sell boxes of crushed cornflake crumbs specifically for
    baking with. If you can't find this, use a rolling pin and place cornflakes
    between two sheets of waxed paper and crush them. You don't want a powder
    but you don't want big pieces of corn flakes, either.

    > Another thing. Why don't you put spices inside eggs, rather then in
    > cornflakes breadcrumb?
    >

    No reason; it's just the way my mom taught me to do it.

    >> To a baking dish of adequate size for the chicken pieces, add a
    >> little cooking oil, about 3-4 Tablespoonfuls (not olive oil, too
    >> strong! canola or
    >> corn oil). Heat it up in a hot oven (about 400F degrees). Quickly
    >> arrange
    >> the chicken in the dish with the hot oil. Bake at a very high
    >> temperature;
    >> if I remember correctly (and I may not) it was 400F or maybe 425F for
    >> about
    >> 20 minutes. No need to cover or turn the chicken; it turned out
    >> crispy. And very tasty!

    >
    > Gnam gnam! I like this recipe! I will eat KFC till summer because I
    > must try almost all :)))
    > Cheers and thank you
    > Pandora
    > (hoping your father stay better then the last time I have heard of
    > him)
    >>

    Thank you... we'll know more about his condition after his trip to the
    doctor on February 2nd.

    Jill
     
  20. "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> writes:

    >For the Birds
    >by Nina Lalli


    >This suspicious declaration is the concluding line of Burger King's
    >promotion for its sickest creation since the Enormous Omelet Sandwich:
    >Chicken Fries.


    Ages ago I used to eat at Burger King quite a bit, but even though I
    love their sick and twisted commercials, I just can't make myself eat
    there anymore. Not with the craptastic food they've been creating
    lately. Chicken Fries was just another nasty nonfood food item on their
    list of atrocities.

    >are predictable. But the showstopper is something called "ZESTY Onion Ring
    >Sauce."


    I confess I love this onion ring sauce. Too bad the onion rings at BK
    are soggy, disgusting rings of doom.

    Stacia
     
Loading...