Kiddy Trailers

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by LotteBum, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. ghostgum

    ghostgum New Member

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    My wife was riding a Malvern Star ladies bike with an upright riding position. None of this leaning over the handlebars business. A style quite common in Europe.

    Her biggest issue was avoiding overheating while riding, which will be more a problem up north.
     


  2. ghostgum

    ghostgum New Member

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    Are sure it was a finger that was sticking up, and not something else?
     
  3. adam85

    adam85 New Member

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    First off - congratulations Lotte and Paulie!!!! Quite a surprise!

    We've got a chariot trailer but we didn't use it much until 8 months or so as babies need to have control of their neck muscles before you take them in it as others have said.

    Chariot also make a infant sling which is intended to allow the baby to lie flat, but they also say that this is only intended when it's used as a stroller but not when it's towed behind a bike. It wasn't much good though as it was more like a hammock with a dip in the middle.

    I did consider the idea of a baby capsule solidly mounted inside as others have suggested. The chariot has a pretty solid cage structure for protection in the case of rollover. But by the time I got serious about it wasn't needed anyway. That would be the way to go but I don't know about the legality it. As far as I could tell legally the baby has to wear a helmet, which is not really possible at an early age. Not only because of the weight of it, but it would push their head forward as well. We ended up using the car a fair bit for the first 9 months or so.

    Adam
     
  4. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    Well, apparently it's a girl. That's only about 80% correct at this stage, but it was definitely a finger. Have you seen how cool the ultrasounds are these days? The one we got conjured up a 3D image of Peanut, who remains quite unattractive at this stage. She looks rather like an old man.

    Lotte
     
  5. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    Thanks. Surprise indeed!

    8 months is better than 12!! How did you find it as a stroller/jogger? And also, how small does it fold? We intend to keep the Corolla, so I'd like something that folds relatively compact.

    Hmm, good to know. I saw it on the website, and wondered if it was any good.

    Shit, this is not looking good. I know it's not a huge priority, but most of you will already know that I'm a bit of a fattie already and I need all the help I can get, so it's important for me to get back on the bike. Walking, whilst I don't mind it (and have to walk the dogs anyway), simply does not have the same effect.

    Does the little guy like the trailer now? Do you use it heaps?

    LH
     
  6. adam85

    adam85 New Member

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    Not as much as we though we might - maybe 3 or 4 times a week - as he is a human dynamo so he finds it hard to sit still for long. To give you an idea did a river loop and had to stop 5 or 6 times so he could run around. He'd much rather be riding his trike. Often times though he will just fall asleep. But it is great for getting around locally, to the bottleshop ("daddy,beer, daddy, beer") to the library, the park, the shops, to the crit track but we mostly stick to bikeways or quiet streets.

    It's good as a stroller and packs down reasonably small, the wheels comes off and it folds in half. Not as small as a dedicated stroller though. It's great for shopping, disconnect it from the bike, put the stroller wheels down and wheel it around the aisles. So much better than getting in and out of a carseat especially if they are asleep. Only problem is when you get to the checkout and it won't fit through! No real room for shopping - you need panniers as well.

    I'd like to try one of those wee-rides as well, where they sit between your legs.

    Adam
     
  7. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    On Sep 11, 1:54 pm, LotteBum <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    >
    > 8 months is better than 12!! How did you find it as a stroller/jogger?
    > And also, how small does it fold? We intend to keep the Corolla, so
    > I'd like something that folds relatively compact.


    It's the Chariot trailer/stroller we've got and whilst it folds, it's
    not particularly compact even when you remove the wheels. Ask if you
    can see one folded down in a bike shop to get the best idea. I don't
    think we've used it as a stroller more than once as the stroller
    handlebar needs removed to fold it down and that involved hooking/
    unhooking the brake cable all the time. Our son is pretty much too big
    for it now anyway (he's 3 1/2 but is the size of many 5 yr olds) but
    it will get more use again around next autumn when our daughter will
    be about the right size for it. It looks like I'll need to get
    something like a trail-gator to tow my son's bike around fow a while.

    Graeme
     
  8. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Patrick Turner wrote:

    > Back in Ancient Times during the 1950s when I was a youngster, the
    > idea of my mum or my father pedling around
    > Sydney Roads with child trailers behind push bikes would have been
    > utterly impractical and
    > entirely irresponsible because of the dangers of riding on the crowded
    > narrow roads.


    Geez Pat, you come from a family of wimps. My mother used to do all her
    vegetable shopping for a family of 11 on her bicycle in Australia. A lot of
    string bags and several trips were required. The grocer delivered.

    > I lived about 17km away from the fabulous Sydney beaches where my
    > sisters and I were taken on many weekends
    > but most certainly not by means of bicycles. The round trip would have
    > been utterly exhausting
    > and dangerous due to large hills and steep descents, and the bloody
    > traffic.


    17kms? Phht, used to ride nearly that far to see my girlfriend when I was
    16. When I was 12 my sister (14) and I rode 30 kms to the next town (York)
    after lunch on Sunday to see if we could do it.

    > From an early age we walked a mile to primary schools, then later
    > caught buses.
    > I cannot recall a single student riding a bike to school in the 11
    > years at St Leo's.


    At my schools latecomers had to lean their bikes against the outside of the
    bike sheds. Almost everybody rode.

    Theo
     
  9. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Terryc wrote:
    > Theo Bekkers wrote:
    >
    >>> Yes. Contrary to popular belief, I am not a virgin.

    >>
    >>
    >> <applause> Great response Lotte.

    >
    > Sex traitor. You haven't enquired whether the sperm donor survived the
    > encounter {:).


    Apparently, but Lotte mentioned that the conception was "unusual". I don't
    think I want any more details. Some people are just weird eh? :)

    Theo
     
  10. Duracell Bunny

    Duracell Bunny New Member

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    We would not want Lotte to be anything else, we like her just the way she is. As long as the shottie's not pointing this way :D

    DB
     
  11. In aus.bicycle on Tue, 11 Sep 2007 15:13:51 +0800
    Theo Bekkers <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Patrick Turner wrote:
    >
    >> Back in Ancient Times during the 1950s when I was a youngster, the
    >> idea of my mum or my father pedling around
    >> Sydney Roads with child trailers behind push bikes would have been
    >> utterly impractical and
    >> entirely irresponsible because of the dangers of riding on the crowded
    >> narrow roads.

    >
    > Geez Pat, you come from a family of wimps. My mother used to do all her
    > vegetable shopping for a family of 11 on her bicycle in Australia. A lot of
    > string bags and several trips were required. The grocer delivered.


    Depends where, I suppose. I was riding a bike on roads in Nedlands
    from grade 1, and on the Stirling Highway by grade 6. The streets
    were about the width of the ones in Campsie which is middle ring
    Sydney. Stirling Highway then was about as busy as umm.. most major
    roads in Leichardt now.

    >
    > 17kms? Phht, used to ride nearly that far to see my girlfriend when I was
    > 16. When I was 12 my sister (14) and I rode 30 kms to the next town (York)
    > after lunch on Sunday to see if we could do it.


    I didn't ride to the beach. Can't remember how far away Cottesloe is
    from Neddies. I took the 72 bus. Got driven there till I was old
    enough to take the bus.

    >> From an early age we walked a mile to primary schools, then later
    >> caught buses.
    >> I cannot recall a single student riding a bike to school in the 11
    >> years at St Leo's.

    >
    > At my schools latecomers had to lean their bikes against the outside of the
    > bike sheds. Almost everybody rode.


    My primary school had a bike shed, the high school had a large bike
    parking area under one of the buildings. Both were quite full when I
    was attending. BUt then they were state schools, so the kids lived
    locally.

    I don't see kids riding to my local primary, they mostly walk. But I
    do see them riding to other schools on my way to work.

    Zebee
     
  12. In aus.bicycle on Tue, 11 Sep 2007 14:41:46 +1000
    LotteBum <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Graeme Dods Wrote:
    >> I don't know, depends on which section of the library you're browsing.
    >> There are some very unusual text books out there!

    > That reminds me of the pregnancy book Paulie's mum got us. It's very
    > focused on getting you in the bedroom - almost to the point of wanting
    > you to shag like the clappers during labour.


    What a very liberal book.

    Zebee
     
  13. Theo Bekkers wrote:
    >
    > Patrick Turner wrote:
    >
    > > Back in Ancient Times during the 1950s when I was a youngster, the
    > > idea of my mum or my father pedling around
    > > Sydney Roads with child trailers behind push bikes would have been
    > > utterly impractical and
    > > entirely irresponsible because of the dangers of riding on the crowded
    > > narrow roads.

    >
    > Geez Pat, you come from a family of wimps.


    You would say that of course, but wimps we are not.

    My mum is 91, going OK, and thankfully she and my father did not expose
    me to
    unnecessary dangers of Sydney roads by dragging me around in kiddie
    trailers amoung
    the louts, hoons, and drunks in the 1950s.

    > My mother used to do all her
    > vegetable shopping for a family of 11 on her bicycle in Australia. A lot of
    > string bags and several trips were required. The grocer delivered.


    I am sure I could find a mum who shopped for 25 kids using a bike,
    but she'd be a rare issue.

    I find shopping with a bike is boring, so i don't do it.

    Shopping only takes me 15 minute max, and the health benefit is
    negligible during the
    10 minute ride involved.

    I prefer riding for 3 to 4 hours at a time, just for the sheer
    wonderment of it all,
    and not having to park a bike, worry about it being nicked,
    stuffing around with bags dangling off bars and so on.


    >
    > > I lived about 17km away from the fabulous Sydney beaches where my
    > > sisters and I were taken on many weekends
    > > but most certainly not by means of bicycles. The round trip would have
    > > been utterly exhausting
    > > and dangerous due to large hills and steep descents, and the bloody
    > > traffic.

    >
    > 17kms? Phht, used to ride nearly that far to see my girlfriend when I was
    > 16. When I was 12 my sister (14) and I rode 30 kms to the next town (York)
    > after lunch on Sunday to see if we could do it.


    Quite some hills involved though in the 17km to the becaches in Sydney.
    17km back again.
    but if you lived at Liverpool, ppl rarely went ever to the beaches.
    I couldn't possibly imagine my parents coping with a kiddie trailer
    over the distances and hills involved. They had far more sense than to
    attempt what was for them stupid, foolhardy, time wasting
    and plain exhausting.

    Just because people don't exercize as much as you or i do, it does not
    mean they are wimps.

    Both my parents worked hard at being parents, were busy night and day,
    and none of us were overweight.

    During 14 years of doing very little exercize until last year
    I was never very unhealthy; health is rather genetically determined, as
    is the level of possible
    fitness, and to try to live only to be fit would be a monumentally
    boring selfish pastime afaiac.
    I had a problem with my knees and a condition which needed a long
    overdue operation,
    and sure you young turks might find that boring, but just youse all wait
    until you want to be healthier than you are, and can't be because
    there's a problem which stops you.
    It happens.

    But yeah, some sheilas I knew in my 40s were worth riding across town
    for a visit.
    Had a nice ride or two after I arrived, and needed a recovery ride home
    at about 3 am.

    Beautiful in summer....

    But I've never ever known any sheila who could keep up with me either on
    or off the bike.
    So I've never expected them to be able to keep up, and don't mind
    waiting at the top of hills
    if the overall effect is worth it.
    I once married someome who wasn't very "physical", and it barely lasted
    12 months,
    I drove her crazy because I was always doing something. I tried not to
    notice how lazy she was,
    but you know how it is, they read your mind anyway, and felt quite ill
    at ease, and off she went.
    I have always found women who were as busy as my mum to be extremely
    rare, and married to someone else,
    and strange thing was that the guys were such lazy buggers....

    I rarely ever met any women who ever rode anywhere. Seems to me 90% of
    sheilas
    give up virtually all exercise which makes their heart race longer than
    5 minutes after they finish high school.
    At 60, I have yet to be passed on the road by any female during the last
    12 months.
    I cannot recall ever seeing a female my age out riding with any vigour.
    The tiny number of oldies
    I do see are into taking it real easy. But then there are very few guys
    at 60.....

    When I raced at age 40 in the B grade local vets, the very best of the
    young females who raced
    in the club could barely keep up with us. But in the first Canberra 2
    day open tour I did,
    and i rode in 5, there was ONE Victorian female in class E, where i was,
    and she rode away from me with most
    of the other vets and juniors. I remember she was also about 40, and
    built to go fast. She was the only female
    I have ever seen with courage enough to race with the men.
    Grades were A,B,C,D,and E. With many competitors, if they didn't score
    close to the leaders after day 1,
    they'd piss off home to Sydney etc rather than pay for the overnight
    stay and ride the really hard third race on the second day.
    On day 2, she was gone, I was there, and so I wasn't last.
    It was very good training for anyone.

    There are many more females out on bikes now than ever before, nearly
    all under 25, and mostly childless,
    but gee, don't the numbers collapse during winter.
    Its great to see them out when you do see them, but its a pity most see
    exercize as too much of a challenge,
    and its sad they just can't seem to enjoy it.


    >
    > > From an early age we walked a mile to primary schools, then later
    > > caught buses.
    > > I cannot recall a single student riding a bike to school in the 11
    > > years at St Leo's.

    >
    > At my schools latecomers had to lean their bikes against the outside of the
    > bike sheds. Almost everybody rode.
    >
    > Theo


    In many schools here there are clouds of bicycles because its safe
    enough on the cycle paths.

    Very few parents like their kids riding on roads.

    But unlike the 1950s, there are clouds of parents driving kids to and
    from schools each day,
    methinks they spoil or worry about them too much.

    Patrick Turner.
     
  14. SMS

    SMS Guest

    LotteBum wrote:
    > I've been doing some research on transporting children on bikes, and the
    > pros and cons of rear and front mounted seats versus trailers. The
    > general consensus, I'm finding, is that trailers are the way to go.
    >
    > My problem, however, is that most say you should not use these for
    > child carrying purposes until the child is 12 months old, as they run
    > the risk of suffering from shaken baby syndrome prior to this. I find
    > this absurd. Are people supposed to walk or drive their children
    > around for a whole year?
    >
    > Does anyone have any advice regarding this?


    A smooth riding trailer is probably no worse than a car!

    I put my kids automobile car seat inside the trailer when they were
    small. I wouldn't put a six month old inside a trailer without the
    support and restraints of a car seat, and of course they should not be
    wearing a helmet (even though this is illegal in most places).

    Always use a trailer with shielded wheels, i.e. the Burley d'lite (prior
    to the 2007 model), or the current Schwinn Mark III. Avoid any trailer
    that doesn't have the aluminum tubing around the outside of the wheels,
    i.e. the new Burley d'Lite is no good.

    I wouldn't take a baby on rough roads, but on a smooth road or path I
    wouldn't hesitate to do so.
     
  15. BT Humble

    BT Humble Guest

    Patrick Turner wrote:
    > Theo Bekkers wrote:
    >
    > > Patrick Turner wrote:

    >
    > > > Back in Ancient Times during the 1950s when I was a youngster, the
    > > > idea of my mum or my father pedling around
    > > > Sydney Roads with child trailers behind push bikes would have been
    > > > utterly impractical and
    > > > entirely irresponsible because of the dangers of riding on the crowded
    > > > narrow roads.

    >
    > > Geez Pat, you come from a family of wimps.

    >
    > You would say that of course, but wimps we are not.


    <snip>

    Dear Pat,

    Why do you have to write an essay every time you post? When Theo
    needles you like that, a simple "Oh yeah? Well YOU are!" is more than
    sufficient.

    Concisely yours,


    BTH
     
  16. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Patrick Turner wrote:
    > Theo Bekkers wrote:


    >> 17kms? Phht, used to ride nearly that far to see my girlfriend when
    >> I was
    >> 16. When I was 12 my sister (14) and I rode 30 kms to the next town
    >> (York) after lunch on Sunday to see if we could do it.


    > Quite some hills involved though in the 17km to the becaches in
    > Sydney. 17km back again.


    You think there are no hills where I lived? Or do you think I am not
    familiar with Sydney?

    > But yeah, some sheilas I knew in my 40s were worth riding across town
    > for a visit.
    > Had a nice ride or two after I arrived, and needed a recovery ride
    > home at about 3 am.


    Oh dear, you're not supposed to 'root and tell' Patrick.

    > I rarely ever met any women who ever rode anywhere. Seems to me 90% of
    > sheilas
    > give up virtually all exercise which makes their heart race longer
    > than 5 minutes after they finish high school.
    > At 60, I have yet to be passed on the road by any female during the
    > last 12 months.


    And yet they outlive us guys by an average of three years.

    >> At my schools latecomers had to lean their bikes against the outside
    >> of the bike sheds. Almost everybody rode.


    > In many schools here there are clouds of bicycles because its safe
    > enough on the cycle paths.


    No bicycle paths where I went to school Pat.

    Theo
     
  17. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    BT Humble wrote:
    > Patrick Turner wrote:
    >> Theo Bekkers wrote:


    >>> Geez Pat, you come from a family of wimps.

    >>
    >> You would say that of course, but wimps we are not.

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Dear Pat,
    >
    > Why do you have to write an essay every time you post? When Theo
    > needles you like that, a simple "Oh yeah? Well YOU are!" is more than
    > sufficient.


    What? Me needle? I feel insulted now.

    Theo
    :)
     
  18. Terryc

    Terryc Guest

    Patrick Turner wrote:

    > Quite some hills involved though in the 17km to the becaches in Sydney.
    > 17km back again.


    You obviously didn't try.

    > but if you lived at Liverpool, ppl rarely went ever to the beaches.


    hahahahahahahaha. Liverpool England?
     
  19. Terryc

    Terryc Guest

    Patrick Turner wrote:

    > and sure you young turks might find that boring,


    Lol, you haven't twigged yet have you?

    Lets face it, you are a stupid fat arsed know it all.

    Your posts are a continuous spew of excuses as to why you can not be
    bothered getting your arse on a bicycle.

    Then you proceed to tell your elders what they should be doing.

    Hint, it was your father, who you claimed rode Sydney to Cairns and
    return, not you [BTDT]. He must have gained some bad karma afterwards to
    be blessed with such an idiot son as yourself.
     
  20. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    On Sep 12, 4:05 am, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Avoid any trailer
    > that doesn't have the aluminum tubing around the outside of the wheels,
    > i.e. the new Burley d'Lite is no good.


    And a second vote for the tubing outside the wheels. There's bound to
    be a time when you misjudge your position whilst passing a bollard and
    clip it slightly[1]. The protection round the wheels means it just has
    a bit of a skip sideways. Without them I think it would be fairly
    likely the wheel could stop dead or lift up rather alarmingly.

    Graeme

    [1] Or so I've heard, apparently, never happened to me of course, no
    never :-o
     
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