Kitchen Sink

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by citizen142, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. citizen142

    citizen142 Guest

    I like to read the of the adventures and cycling tours of the people
    on:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/

    especially on long winter evenings. The thing that strikes me most is
    just how much they carry. They lovingly show photos of their 'steeds'
    with what seems to be excessive luggage. Front panniers, rear
    panniers, handlebar bag and the latest bargain from B&Q in kitchen
    sinks!

    I am assuming now that this is a non-camping tour but I have always
    worked on the formula: one on, two off, i.e.: socks three, pants
    three, vests three, cycling tops three, shorts three, etc. and with
    this I have toured for 3 weeks. I also reason that it would be the
    same for three months or more.

    Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort
    every night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away
    with?
     
    Tags:


  2. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    citizen142 wrote:
    > I like to read the of the adventures and cycling tours of the people
    > on:
    >
    > http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
    >
    > especially on long winter evenings. The thing that strikes me most is
    > just how much they carry. They lovingly show photos of their 'steeds'
    > with what seems to be excessive luggage. Front panniers, rear
    > panniers, handlebar bag and the latest bargain from B&Q in kitchen
    > sinks!
    >
    > I am assuming now that this is a non-camping tour but I have always
    > worked on the formula: one on, two off, i.e.: socks three, pants
    > three, vests three, cycling tops three, shorts three, etc. and with
    > this I have toured for 3 weeks. I also reason that it would be the
    > same for three months or more.
    >
    > Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort
    > every night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away
    > with?


    If I'm not taking the tent, inflatable mattress and sleeping bag etc.,
    then everything I need fits in one pannier, unless its both cold and
    raining, in which case said pannier would be about half full. Apart from
    the fleece, everything would fit in one washing machine load when I got
    back, so weight wise I suppose it can't be more than 5 to 7 lbs (I'm not
    including stuff like a lock, which I would take on every journey, and I
    don't put my bathroom bag in the washing machine). I've never actually
    done a non-camping tour, so I normally take 2 panniers and a barbag.
    I've not toured for more than 2 weeks at a stretch, though.

    JimP

    --
    Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to
    grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after
    all. - DNA
     
  3. Bob C

    Bob C Guest

    What capacity panniers?

    --
    Bob C
    "Jim Price" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > citizen142 wrote:
    >> I like to read the of the adventures and cycling tours of the people on:
    >>
    >> http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
    >>
    >> especially on long winter evenings. The thing that strikes me most is
    >> just how much they carry. They lovingly show photos of their 'steeds'
    >> with what seems to be excessive luggage. Front panniers, rear panniers,
    >> handlebar bag and the latest bargain from B&Q in kitchen sinks!
    >>
    >> I am assuming now that this is a non-camping tour but I have always
    >> worked on the formula: one on, two off, i.e.: socks three, pants three,
    >> vests three, cycling tops three, shorts three, etc. and with this I have
    >> toured for 3 weeks. I also reason that it would be the same for three
    >> months or more.
    >>
    >> Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort every
    >> night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away with?

    >
    > If I'm not taking the tent, inflatable mattress and sleeping bag etc.,
    > then everything I need fits in one pannier, unless its both cold and
    > raining, in which case said pannier would be about half full. Apart from
    > the fleece, everything would fit in one washing machine load when I got
    > back, so weight wise I suppose it can't be more than 5 to 7 lbs (I'm not
    > including stuff like a lock, which I would take on every journey, and I
    > don't put my bathroom bag in the washing machine). I've never actually
    > done a non-camping tour, so I normally take 2 panniers and a barbag. I've
    > not toured for more than 2 weeks at a stretch, though.
    >
    > JimP
    >
    > --
    > Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to
    > grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after
    > all. - DNA
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Jim Price wrote:
    >
    > If I'm not taking the tent, inflatable mattress and sleeping bag etc.,
    > then everything I need fits in one pannier, unless its both cold and
    > raining, in which case said pannier would be about half full. Apart from
    > the fleece, everything would fit in one washing machine load when I got
    > back, so weight wise I suppose it can't be more than 5 to 7 lbs (I'm not
    > including stuff like a lock, which I would take on every journey, and I
    > don't put my bathroom bag in the washing machine). I've never actually
    > done a non-camping tour, so I normally take 2 panniers and a barbag.
    > I've not toured for more than 2 weeks at a stretch, though.
    >


    When we've toured as a family on the two tandems we've managed with one
    pannier each (sleeping mat and bag, clothing, washbag and luxury items
    (toys/books, radio etc) each plus a BOB trailer (four man tent, cooking
    gear, food) for up to four weeks.
    http://www.raven-family.com/Touring.htm

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  5. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "citizen142" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I like to read the of the adventures and cycling tours of the people
    > on:
    >
    > http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
    >
    > especially on long winter evenings. The thing that strikes me most is
    > just how much they carry. They lovingly show photos of their 'steeds'
    > with what seems to be excessive luggage. Front panniers, rear
    > panniers, handlebar bag and the latest bargain from B&Q in kitchen
    > sinks!
    >
    > I am assuming now that this is a non-camping tour but I have always
    > worked on the formula: one on, two off, i.e.: socks three, pants
    > three, vests three, cycling tops three, shorts three, etc. and with
    > this I have toured for 3 weeks. I also reason that it would be the
    > same for three months or more.
    >
    > Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort
    > every night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away
    > with?


    I did six weeks in India on two panniers, a bar bag and a camelbak with a
    bit of extra space for valuables.

    Some of the hotels were pretty rank so a ground sheet over the bed and my
    own bedding on top took perhaps half a pannier. The medicine chest took a
    large chunk of space as did the travel detergent and washing gear -- though
    laundries in the better hotels proved good enough. By the end at least half
    a pannier was filled with gifts.

    A couple of litres of extra water were a necessity in some places -- bulky
    and heavy but best not left behind in sparsely populated, near desert
    conditions.

    With more experience and greater ruthlessness I could have cut the stuff I
    carried by 25 - 40% easy.

    I did the whole tour with one cycling top (washed every night) -- but that
    was cock up rather than planned.

    Take only good quality polyester based clothes -- Rohan, Craghopper etc.
    Cotton is crap.

    Shoes take up an inordinate amount of space -- as do maps, guide books and
    chargers for phones, PDA's etc..

    In contrast five days in Germany required four panniers -- but I did have a
    business suit, shiny shoes, posh shirts, ties etc plus laptop, files for
    meetings etc. with me :~(

    + camping gear :~)

    Judicious use of left luggage lessened the burden most of the time.

    T

    T
     
  6. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Tony W wrote:
    >
    > Shoes take up an inordinate amount of space -- as do maps, guide books and
    > chargers for phones, PDA's etc..
    >


    Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.
    Add black socks with long trousers as "smart wear", wear waterproof
    socks if it gets cold or wet. One pair of sandals is all you need and
    not wet soggy shoes to deal with at the end of a wet day.


    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  7. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Tony W wrote:
    >
    > I did six weeks in India on two panniers, a bar bag and a camelbak with a
    > bit of extra space for valuables.
    >


    Many years ago we started to adopt a policy of unless it was essential,
    leave it out and if we found we needed it we would buy one. Its amazing
    how much you carry just in case. Following our policy we packed less
    and less each trip as we gained confidence and found ourselves needing
    to buy nothing. Our pinnacle was a fortnight in Thailand with one small
    bag between us.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  8. Chris Smith

    Chris Smith Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > Tony W wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Shoes take up an inordinate amount of space -- as do maps, guide books
    >> and chargers for phones, PDA's etc..
    >>

    >
    > Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.
    > Add black socks with long trousers as "smart wear", wear waterproof
    > socks if it gets cold or wet. One pair of sandals is all you need and
    > not wet soggy shoes to deal with at the end of a wet day.
    >
    >


    .... and wearing socks under you sandals ensures you will be identified
    as British ;-)
     
  9. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >>

    >
    > Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.
    > Add black socks with long trousers as "smart wear"


    AAAAAAAAAAGGGGHHHHHHH!!!

    Socks with sandals!!!!

    NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

    Cheers, helen s
     
  10. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    0

    What about the touring equivalent to fixedgeargallery viz http://www.pbase.com/canyonlands/fullyloaded

    Doubt I could ride some of those down hill with a strong tailwond :)

    Bryan
     
  11. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to wafflycat:
    > AAAAAAAAAAGGGGHHHHHHH!!!
    >
    > Socks with sandals!!!!
    >
    > NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!


    A goatse.cx for our times - http://www.sandalandsoxer.co.uk


    [Not bothered by it myself, I have to admit.]

    --
    Mark, UK
    "There are some things only intellectuals are crazy enough to believe."
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, citizen142
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I like to read the of the adventures and cycling tours of the people
    > on:
    >
    > http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
    >
    > especially on long winter evenings. The thing that strikes me most is
    > just how much they carry. They lovingly show photos of their 'steeds'
    > with what seems to be excessive luggage. Front panniers, rear
    > panniers, handlebar bag and the latest bargain from B&Q in kitchen
    > sinks!
    >
    > I am assuming now that this is a non-camping tour but I have always
    > worked on the formula: one on, two off, i.e.: socks three, pants
    > three, vests three, cycling tops three, shorts three, etc. and with
    > this I have toured for 3 weeks. I also reason that it would be the
    > same for three months or more.
    >
    > Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort
    > every night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away
    > with?


    Credit card, 6 grammes.

    If you can afford to stay in hotels, all your clothes including padded
    cycling shorts will dry over a radiator over night, so there's no real
    need to carry spare clothes. However, I'd like to have at least a pair
    of lightweight trousers, e.g. Rohan bags (350 grammes), and a pair of
    non-cycling underpants (say 50 grammes) to wear in the evenings, and a
    pair of canvas shoes or sandals (say 400 grammes) to give my feet a rest
    from cycling shoes. A light waterproof (say 500 grammes) can also make
    the difference between reasonable comfort and total misery on cold wet
    days.

    My phone (160 grammes) includes a camera, diary, address book, email
    client and web browser, and if switched on only when in use the battery
    would easily last a fortnight.

    Multi-tool, 78 grammes; tyre levers, three for 34 grammes; spare tube, 80
    grammes; pump, 166 grammes; hand cleaning wipes, say 5 grammes.

    So - not including the clothing you'd be wearing when you set off in the
    morning, water bottles and water, and cereal bars for the day, I make
    that under 1800 grammes of luggage. And I think (given hotels or B&B for
    the nights) that would be enough to be perfectly comfortable for at
    least a week in summer.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    Ring of great evil
    Small one casts it into flame
    Bringing rise of Men ;; gonzoron
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, Tony Raven ([email protected]
    family.com) wrote:

    > Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.


    <URL:http://www.biosbcc.net/ocean/marinesci/04benthon/arcimg/pb050.jpg>

    Are you /sure/ about this, Tony?

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Nicht in die laufende Trommel greifen.
     
  14. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Tony Raven ([email protected]
    > family.com) wrote:
    >
    >> Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.

    >
    > <URL:http://www.biosbcc.net/ocean/marinesci/04benthon/arcimg/pb050.jpg>
    >
    > Are you /sure/ about this, Tony?
    >


    If he is, I suggest this may be of use

    <http://www.shoppingcomparison.co.uk/IMGE/_kstq_zroddcdq_zmds/bbhlfzb_s_knfbhsxzbnl/200000/204700/204700/Pqnctbsr/12190001.jpg>

    Cheers, helen s
     
  15. Mark McNeill <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

    >
    > A goatse.cx for our times - http://www.sandalandsoxer.co.uk
    >
    >


    That's very useful .. I've never understood why some people
    have a problem with socks, but there is indeed some Poor Taste
    on show there.

    The real problem appears not to be sandals with socks, but
    sandals, shorts and tee-shirts with socks. Sandals worn with
    long trousers and tastefully-coloured socks are inoffensive.
    Sandals worn with bright shirts, trunks, and long white socks
    are repulsive.

    But it's not the foot-in-sock that's the problem - it's the
    ankle. So shorts, trainers and socks ought to be equally bad.
    Why don't the fashion police go for them ? Could it be that
    they're scared of offending trainer-wearers but consider
    sandal-wearers an easy target ?

    -adrian
     
  16. Adrian Godwin wrote:

    > The real problem appears not to be sandals with socks


    Wrong.

    > sandals, shorts and tee-shirts with socks. Sandals worn with
    > long trousers and tastefully-coloured socks are inoffensive.


    Wrong.

    > Sandals worn with bright shirts, trunks, and long white socks
    > are repulsive.


    Right.

    --
    Chief Inspector, Kent Constabulary (Fashion Division)
     
  17. Pinky

    Pinky Guest

    "citizen142" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:gDhYf.5920
    > <snip><snip>
    > Assuming staying in reasonable hotels or accommodation of some sort
    > every night what is the minimum weight you think you could get away
    > with?
    >

    When I did my first long distance cycle/camping tour to Santiago de
    Compostela in March/April 2004, despite all my efforts I knew that I was
    overloaded BUT my basic camping gear was necessary to be able to withstand
    winter type weather. I was determined that at the end of a days travelling
    that I would be dry and warm. my sleeping bag took up most of one pannier.
    my clothes ( 1 on, one washed and drying, one clean) + medications + wet
    weather gear filled the other rear pannier. Single pot cooking and mini
    stove + 1 days emergency rations in the right front pannier and my
    selfinflating mat in the left front pannier. Tent on the rear rack.
    Nevertheless I used my journey down through England to Portsmouth to start
    the principle of throwing away something every day. By the time I was half
    way down through France I was down to a minimum trim -- I had also lost the
    largest amount of the velos all up weight from "me"
    Last years trip down the Danube was a 49 day in a tent trip. To be honest I
    needed a few more creature comforts and at times I would have cheerfully
    murdered for an above ground level seat.

    This years trip on the Rhein and Mosel starting in mid May, sees me having
    dumped the panniers all together and I have substituted a BOB Yak trailer --
    another weight penalty but I tried one last year while cycling on the Danube
    ( I swapped loads for a day with a German guy). I must admit that towing the
    trailer which carried a heavier load than my panniers make my velo a
    different beast in terms of handling ( I can tell you that those front
    panniers in a head wind take their toll).

    So going uphill is still hard work ( harder?) but I don't blush when I have
    to dismount and push!

    I have also doubled the weight of my tent from 2 kg to 4 kg. My Vango
    Microlight 200 is still in good shape and saw me through some rough weather
    but at 69 in June ( hopefully in Trier on the Mosel) I shall enjoy the
    addition of a porch to my tent. The tent is cheaper ( sale price £35 reduced
    from £55) by a long way than my Vango and will probably last me only 2
    season if I am lucky but it will give me huge increase in space and headroom
    and on those very wet, thundery, windy cold days I hope to have an
    appreciable comfort upgrade,
    Everything else in the load will be reduced yet again. 2 of everything is
    enough.Maps and guides will be posted back to UK as and when. Cooking gear
    is already at a minimum -- but I know it will always be a load.
    Hopefully this year, with the BOB Yak trailer I will have a new learning
    experience.

    By the way I tour for the pleasure of seeing and meeting new people and
    places -- not to make kilometres a day. The furthest I have travelled in a
    day was about 160 kms during my journey through the flat lands of France,
    South of the Gironde ( the next day I did 30 kms!)

    On my trip down and up the Danube last year I met an Oz biker who had cycled
    from Shanghai and he was fixated on doing "mileage" and, despite having
    biked halfway round the world, he had not taken time to "experience" it at
    all!
    Long post -- sorry!
    Trevor A Panther
    In South Yorkshire,
    England, United Kingdom.
    www.tapan.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
     
  18. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Bob C wrote:
    > What capacity panniers?


    35 litres, IIRC.

    JimP

    --
    Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to
    grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after
    all. - DNA
     
  19. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    wafflycat wrote:

    >
    > AAAAAAAAAAGGGGHHHHHHH!!!
    >
    > Socks with sandals!!!!
    >
    > NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!
    >


    If that seeming icon of fashion, Mr Beckham, can be paid what he gets
    paid by the fashion industry and wear them then I have no problem with
    sandals and socks although I realise it may take another century or two
    to penetrate the depths of Norfolk ;-)

    Anyway its at the very very mild end of the offensive scale compared
    with the baggy lycra fest that many cycling shows & CTC runs feature.


    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  20. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Tony Raven ([email protected]
    > family.com) wrote:
    >
    >> Black SPD sandals are the answer. Wear with bear feet most of the time.

    >
    > <URL:http://www.biosbcc.net/ocean/marinesci/04benthon/arcimg/pb050.jpg>
    >
    > Are you /sure/ about this, Tony?
    >


    Damn the speelchucker!!

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
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