Knees problems from a year ago

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ozfactor, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Ozfactor

    Ozfactor New Member

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    So I've had this injury for about a year or more. What happen was during a 100 mile ride, both knees started to ache. I misinterpreted the aching and keep going. Once i finish and started to cool down, I couldn't bend my knees with out intense pain. How it felt was like i was trying to rotate an old knob. This went on for about 3 days and stayed in bed for most of the time, due to not having insurance at the time i couldn't see a doctor. Now a year later I'm trying to go back to cycling, but at times i feel the same pain as before but not as intense coming back. What may be the problem and is it fixable to continue cycling?
     
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  2. devil94

    devil94 New Member

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    Just curious ... in what part of the knee is the pain (outside/inside/front/back)? ... I developed a case of ITBS (Iliotibial band syndrome) last Nov/Dec ... the cure was rest, stretching, and a slight adjustment on my bike (seat height/position, cleat position)
     
  3. Ozfactor

    Ozfactor New Member

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    It was the inside of my knees
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Ask a doctor.
     
  5. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    If I were a betting man and only had this information to go on, I would say patellofemoral syndrome or patellofemoral arthritis. This could be something that could be made worse by cycling. Get a proper evaluation from a sports medicine specalist.
     
  6. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    My father had Arthritis in both his knees. Both of his knees were replaced before he was 60 years old. He had a severe reaction to the anesthesia during his first replacement leaving him with a case of hiccups that lasted for 7 days. He had to stay in the hospital throughout the entire ordeal. When it came time for the second knee to be replaced he decided not to be put under. They did some type of nerve block with pain meds. He was awake for the entire procedure and he used to tell us all about it hammering and all.
    I know this isnt any help for you but I felt let sharing it.

    Seek medical advice from your doctor they can help.
     
  7. Ozfactor

    Ozfactor New Member

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    Maydog, the pain was exactly like patellofemoral syndrome . I'm a try to same some money to go see the doctor to confirm if this is whats happening to my knees.
     
  8. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Davereo,

    I have a total knee waiting for me in the future, currently I am too young to consider it. For now I am biding time by being careful with my training routines and having lesser surgeries - injections are the next step. Your dad likely had an epidural block on his second knee replacement - you loose absoutely all feeling and control from the waist down. Its a freaky experience, but better than pain.

    Orthapedic surgeons have been compared to carpenters for good reason. I have watched a few total knee operations, there is a lot of sawing, drilling and pounding involved. You often think of surgery being this delicate and quiet operation - this is very deliberate, loud and forceful.

    Ozfactor,

    I don't know about your insurance situation; but I think you can get a lot of useful information from an office visit. There is no reason to see a GP first, you should be able to self refer to a specialist. Likely they would take X-rays of your knees, arthritis should be obvious from that. It should cost only an office visit copay or two - or a couple hundred if you are uninsured. The administrative staff should be able to answer any reimbursement questions prior to the appointment.

    Things don't start getting expensive until you need special tests like an MRI or have a procedure done.

    I would think that you will have less options available and they would be more expensive if you wait and the problem gets worse.
     
  9. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Maydog,
    My father was a letter carrier for the postal service in the city of Fall River for 30 years. His days were spent walking the concrete sidewalks and climbing the stairs of the tenement house's. He had this driving force in him that even had him walking to and from work. Back in the day Fall River was known as the city of hills and mills.

    Typical tenement house check out the stairs on the house to the right. The mail boxes are mounted on the house's. As you can see the house are right up to the sidewalk so there are no rural boxes.
    [​IMG]

    Typical road grade. Although the highest point in the city is 200' the roads from the west end on the bay raise abruptly to the east the street shown below was on my fathers route.
    [​IMG]
     
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