Kona Hei Hei frame

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Steve Niece, Jun 25, 2004.

  1. Steve Niece

    Steve Niece Guest

    I'm looking at picking up a used Kona Hei Hei frame for a (rarely
    ridden) mountain bike. It's a fairly old frame, but seems to be in good
    shape. My question is, I think the bike is from the pre V-brake days,
    and doesn't appear to have a cable guide for the rear brake at the top
    tube/seat tube junction. Is this right, or should I be looking for a
    spot where the guide was potentially broken off?

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Stephen
     
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  2. "Steve Niece" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm looking at picking up a used Kona Hei Hei frame for a
    > (rarely ridden) mountain bike. It's a fairly old frame, but
    > seems to be in good shape. My question is, I think the
    > bike is from the pre V-brake days, and doesn't appear
    > to have a cable guide for the rear brake at the top
    > tube/seat tube junction. Is this right, or should I be looking
    > for a spot where the guide was potentially broken off?


    Pre-V-brake Konas used a clamp-on cable guide that fitted around the seat
    tube just above the top tube.

    http://www.konaretro.com/articles/catalogues/1994/8.jpg

    Nothing's broken off your frame, but you'll need to either find the
    necessary guide (called a "dog collar" by Kona, IIRC) - or if you intend to
    use V-brakes, provide a stop of some kind at the rear of the top tube, or
    run a full length of housing to the rear brake.

    James Thomson
     
  3. Steve Niece <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm looking at picking up a used Kona Hei Hei frame for a (rarely
    > ridden) mountain bike. It's a fairly old frame, but seems to be in good
    > shape. My question is, I think the bike is from the pre V-brake days,
    > and doesn't appear to have a cable guide for the rear brake at the top
    > tube/seat tube junction. Is this right, or should I be looking for a
    > spot where the guide was potentially broken off?
    >
    > Any help is greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Stephen


    I have an 12 year old Hei Hei that I put V-brakes on a number of years
    ago. The bike is currently in a storage locker so I can't easily go
    look at to see of there is a cable guide but I suspect something is
    missing on the bike you're looking at because I had no problem putting
    V-brakes on mine.
     
  4. Steve Niece

    Steve Niece Guest

    Thanks for the inputs guys. A couple of friends of mine who are
    previous Kona owners confirmed that the rear guide isn't a part of the
    frame. Like you say, it looks like for V-brakes I'll need to anchor
    some kind of cable stop to the top tube which shouldn't be too much of a
    problem. The whole bike (cheap components and a rigid fork) cost me
    $160 Canadian, so I think I can make some concessions!

    Steve

    Eagle Jackson wrote:

    > Steve Niece <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>I'm looking at picking up a used Kona Hei Hei frame for a (rarely
    >>ridden) mountain bike. It's a fairly old frame, but seems to be in good
    >>shape. My question is, I think the bike is from the pre V-brake days,
    >>and doesn't appear to have a cable guide for the rear brake at the top
    >>tube/seat tube junction. Is this right, or should I be looking for a
    >>spot where the guide was potentially broken off?
    >>
    >>Any help is greatly appreciated.
    >>
    >>Thanks,
    >>Stephen

    >
    >
    > I have an 12 year old Hei Hei that I put V-brakes on a number of years
    > ago. The bike is currently in a storage locker so I can't easily go
    > look at to see of there is a cable guide but I suspect something is
    > missing on the bike you're looking at because I had no problem putting
    > V-brakes on mine.
     
  5. Steve Niece <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > The whole bike (cheap components and a rigid fork) cost me
    > $160 Canadian, so I think I can make some concessions!
    >


    Awesome deal you got! Until I finally got a FS mtn bike last summer,
    I used my Hei Hei for over 10 years of heavy use. It is a great bike.
    It's light but still almost indestructible. I crashed it many times
    with no ill effects to the bike. Every part except the cranks has
    been replaced multiple times, but the frame is still in great shape
    and never had any problems. The dropouts are 6-4 Ti and withstood
    crashes that would have bent or broken any other dropout (and did with
    my previous mtn bike, a Bontrager Race, which is a legendary bike but
    I prefer the Hei Hei).

    Slap some slicks on it and it's a great city bike too.
     
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